ACC: Florida State Seminoles

2015 ACC schedule breakdown

January, 30, 2015
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Now that we have all had some time to digest the 2015 ACC schedule, let us look at the most noteable takeaways.

[+] EnlargeDeshaun Watson
John David Mercer/USA TODAY SportsDeshaun Watson and Clemson will get a later shot at Florida State in 2015, which is a positive development.
The good: Moving Florida State-Clemson to November. If both teams are as good as they have been in recent years, then their game will again determine the Atlantic Division. And there is nothing better than a high-stakes division contest in November, as opposed to September. There was absolutely no drama in the Atlantic this past season after Florida State beat the Tigers in Week 4; the Noles' spot in the ACC championship game was virtually solidified. As Jared Shanker pointed out, the ACC will have nationally relevant games in all three months of the 2015 regular season. That is absolutely huge.

The bad: North Carolina and Boston College are saddled with two FCS games apiece, a fact that did not go unnoticed Thursday. There is a simple explanation: previously scheduled games fell through and both schools were left scrambling. North Carolina had initially scheduled Ohio State for 2015. The game was moved, then subsequently canceled when the Big Ten voted to play nine conference games. Two more factors were at play: the ACC reversed course on a nine-game league schedule when it agreed to a partnership with Notre Dame. North Carolina wanted to wait on that schedule rotation to see how it would shake out. While having two FCS teams on the schedule is far from ideal, North Carolina does play two power-five teams with Illinois and South Carolina. As for Boston College, New Mexico State recently backed out of a 2015 game against the Eagles because it overscheduled. That left a hole the Boston College had to fill on very short notice. So Howard was added. Nobody is running around throwing a party over the FCS opponents. Sometimes these dilemmas happen. (Remember when Florida State had to replace West Virginia with Savannah State?)

The ugly: Poor Syracuse. Not only do the Orange get LSU in nonconference play, they also have the toughest three-game conference stretch of anybody in the ACC: at Florida State, at Louisville and Clemson on three straight weekends spanning the end of October into November. Nobody else in the Atlantic has to face the division's top three teams consecutively. Miami also faces a tough three-game stretch in October that could make or break Coastal Division hopes: at Florida State, Virginia Tech and Clemson. Nope, the Canes got no favors when they traded Louisville from the Atlantic for the Tigers. But there might not be anything uglier than the NC State nonconference schedule: Troy, Eastern Kentucky and then road games (yes, road games) against Old Dominion and South Alabama.

The byes: A 13-week scheduling window wreaked some havoc with the way the schedules were created because there was only space for one open week. ACC senior associate commissioner of football operations Michael Strickland had some good insight into how that was handled. Some teams are going to suffer more than others. Boston College has 10 straight games before its open date. Opening with the two FCS games might not serve as any consolation. Wake Forest, Virginia Tech and Georgia Tech each have to play nine straight games to open the season; Florida State, Miami, Pitt and Clemson have to play nine straight games to end the season. The bye week is placed at an odd time for Clemson. The Tigers play Louisville on Thursday, Sept. 17 then go 15 days until they play again, Oct. 3 against Notre Dame. That is the longest regular-season layoff in school history.

The different: Friday night is the new weekday favorite in the ACC, with more announced dates than Thursday night, the former go-to spot. David Teel of the Daily Press has a great explainer piece on the topic, but it all comes down to television. The ACC will feature its top four teams from 2014 on either Thursday or Friday night this upcoming season. Strategery is definitely involved there.

The impossible: Once again, Virginia has the toughest schedule in the ACC, facing 10 teams that made bowl games in 2014. The move to overschedule is an interesting one, especially when you look at the nonconference scheduling models that NC State and Duke have followed. Both those programs have the worst nonconference schedules in 2015, choosing an easier route toward bowl eligibility. Last season, for example, Virginia was vastly improved, but still finished 5-7 with a backbreaking nonconference schedule. NC State finished 8-5 with a bowl victory, thanks to a cupcake nonconference schedule. NC State has scheduled up in the future to meet the requirement that ACC teams play at least one Power 5 opponent. But for right now, this schedule is hugely beneficial in the wins column. In the case of Virginia, the Hoos would be pleased if they make it out of their first four games against UCLA, Notre Dame, William & Mary and Boise State 2-2.

As former Virginia offensive lineman Luke Bowanko tweeted Thursday after the schedule was released:

Jimbo Fisher, Paul JohnsonUSA TODAY Sports, Getty ImagesJimbo Fisher, left, and Paul Johnson are expected to have their teams in ACC title contention in 2015.
Those tired of Clemson and Florida State deciding the ACC Atlantic Division -- and a potential College Football Playoff berth in this new era -- in September and October, received a welcome surprise Thursday morning.

The Tigers and Seminoles will play Nov. 7, and the winner very well could have the inside track to represent the ACC in the playoffs.

That is, of course, if either team can get through an October date with Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets, who dismantled Mississippi State in the Orange Bowl, might just be the ACC’s best team in 2015 and favorite to make the playoff. Georgia Tech travels to Clemson on Oct. 10, then hosts Florida State on Oct. 24.

If Clemson, Florida State, and Georgia Tech all live up to preseason billings, the ACC has positioned itself to be in the national conversation from September to November, which ends with feature games against SEC teams. By mid-October last season, Florida State was the only ACC school in contention. By comparison, the SEC West had three of the top four teams in the playoff and dominated playoff talk for several weeks.

For a conference that has regularly been called the worst among the Power 5, it’s important for the ACC to have showcase games throughout the season, and especially in the later months. Florida State at Clemson will do that on Nov. 7, completing the Clemson-FSU-Georgia Tech round robin that should decide the conference if preseason predictions hold up. They are marquee games that will capture the attention of the selection committee, and the winners will likely be adding late-season quality wins to boost their résumés.

Of course, those games will mean little if those teams cannot make it through the rest of the league schedule relatively unscathed. Louisville is regarded as the fourth-best team in the league heading into 2015, but as an Atlantic team it will have its opportunity to emerge as a playoff contender. The Cardinals travel to Florida State a month after hosting Clemson on Sept. 17, and then the schedule sets up nice for a 6-0 finish. If the Cardinals can go 2-1 in the games against Auburn (Sept. 5 in Atlanta), Clemson, and Florida State, they will be in position to make a playoff run. That’s a big if, as the Cardinals must still settle on a quarterback and overhaul the defense. They might have been better off with those games being played late in the season, although Auburn and Florida State will be breaking in new quarterbacks, too.

Louisville hosts Clemson on Thursday, Sept. 17, and that midweek prime-time showdown could be a jumping off point for a Louisville playoff run.

A day after that midweek showcase game, Florida State has to survive a Friday road trip to Boston College, which narrowly missed an upset of the Seminoles in 2014 (although, who didn’t almost beat FSU in 2014?) and bludgeoned a top-10 USC team.

Then on the following day, Sept. 19, Georgia Tech travels to Notre Dame, which could be poised to make another playoff run with a number of players returning.

When it was announced Notre Dame would be kinda-sorta-half joining the ACC, one of the worries was whether the Fighting Irish would eliminate the league members in the playoff picture. It almost happened last season when the Irish were an offensive pass interference call away from knocking off undefeated Florida State. Well, it could happen this season as the Irish play host to Georgia Tech, then head south to play Clemson two weeks later.

Of course, if Georgia Tech and/or Clemson beat Notre Dame and the Irish go on to have a successful season navigating a decently tough schedule, it will check off another box with the committee for the Yellow Jackets and Tigers.

In this new era, ultimately, that is what it’s all about: getting to the playoffs. This ACC schedule should keep that conversation alive deep into the season.
The ACC will have an opportunity to make a big-time statement when the 2015 season kicks off.

That has become par for the course.

In what has become an annual rite of passage, the ACC has four blockbuster meetings against Power 5 opponents set for Week 1:
  • North Carolina vs. South Carolina on Thurs., Sept. 3 in Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Louisville vs. Auburn on Sat., Sept. 5 in the annual Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta. On the same day, Virginia travels to face UCLA at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California.
  • Then, perhaps the most anticipated game of the weekend: defending national champion Ohio State travels to play Virginia Tech on Labor Day Night. This marks the Hokies' third appearance on Labor Day Monday; the game will be nationally televised by ESPN.

Those were among the big games spotlighted when the ACC released its schedule on Thursday. In all, ACC teams will play more games against teams that are ranked in ESPN’s Way-Too-Early 2015 Top 25 rankings (12) than any of the other Power 5 conferences. ACC teams also are playing a higher percentage of Power 5 teams (38 percent) than any other Power 5 conference.

None of this comes as a surprise, considering how strongly the ACC has scheduled nonconference opponents in recent years. For the ACC to continue to make inroads toward changing national perception, it will have to keep winning the spotlight games. As it stands, the ACC most likely will be the underdog in those four opening -weekend contests. And many people believe the only way an ACC team can make it into the playoff is with an unblemished record.

In addition to those marquee nonconference games, all eyes will be squarely on Florida State, Clemson and Georgia Tech as prime playoff contenders.

We should know more about their ACC and College Football Playoff fates over a four-week period spanning October and November.

Circle your calendars for:
  • Georgia Tech at Clemson, Oct. 10
  • Florida State at Georgia Tech, Oct. 24
  • Florida State at Clemson, Nov. 7

As for the always important mid-week games, Virginia Tech might not be hosting a Thursday night contest in 2015, but it does have Labor Day against the Buckeyes and a Friday night home game against NC State on Oct. 9. The Hokies also travel to play Georgia Tech on Thurs., Nov. 12.

Florida State and Clemson have mid-week games as well: Louisville will host the Tigers on Thurs., Sept. 17 in a game that should have Atlantic Division implications, while Florida State plays at Boston College the next day. Boise State at Virginia (Sept. 25); Louisville at Wake Forest (Oct. 30); and Miami at Pitt (Nov. 27) round out the Friday night slate. North Carolina at Pitt on Oct. 29 is the only other Thursday night game.

ACC morning links

January, 29, 2015
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With the new contract signed and details made public, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher is now among the highest-paid coaches in college football, making at least $5 million annually over the life of the contract.

It’s the second raise for Fisher in the past 13 months, but that’s the nature of coaching at the highest levels of college football these days. On the heels of a 29-game winning streak and berth in the inaugural College Football Playoff, Fisher earned a bump in pay to put him in the exclusive club of coaches making $5 million annually.

It’s not as easy to win at Florida State as some other perennial top-10 programs despite the consistent success the school has achieved over the past four decades. Tallahassee is four hours or more from most of Florida’s hubs for high school talent, and Fisher doesn’t enjoy the limitless recruiting budget some schools can offer coaching staffs. Fisher had to overhaul a program to reshape it in his own image, and he did it in just the few years following Bobby Bowden.

Fisher has been criticized as a coach before, and there are already questions as to whether the Florida State program can maintain its status without Jameis Winston. The numbers are in Fisher’s favor, though. He has won three straight ACC titles, a national title and has lost only once since December 2012. Florida State can’t afford to allow another college program swoon Fisher and give the sixth-year coach reason to leave.

Florida State likely isn’t going to find a better coach and recruiter than Fisher, who is wrapping up a top-three class, his fourth in the past five years. While the school has been reluctant to open its checkbook in the past, the administration had to lock up Fisher for the foreseeable future. They did that with the contract extension and the buyout, which starts at $5 million and then decreases in the following years.

Credit the FSU administration, too, for doing what it can to remain competitive with the rest of the college football powerhouses, especially in the SEC. The school opened its pockets to Fisher’s assistants, too, giving Fisher another $750,000 to pay his assistant coaches. A number of Seminoles assistants have left the program over the past three seasons. There was an assistant coaching exodus from Tallahassee following the 2012 season, and Jeremy Pruitt made the high-profile move from Florida State to Georgia before the start of the 2014 season.

If Fisher can win a fourth consecutive ACC championship despite an overhaul on offense and defense heading into 2015, there’s a good chance the school will be announcing another extension around the same time next year.

Here’s a few more links around the ACC:
  • Stephone Anthony and Grady Jarrett reflect on their time at Clemson in separate Q&As. Anthony is here and Jarrett is here.
  • Florida State announced its spring game will be Apr. 11.
  • Duke Johnson and Ereck Flowers, who both declared early for the NFL draft, will be going to the NFL combine along with six of their senior Miami teammates.
  • What type of offensive coordinator will Boston College attempt to hire?
  • Here's everything you need to know about Syracuse verbal pledge Eric Dungey.
  • NC State should land two of the state's top prospects, which is not something the Wolfpack -- or any North Carolina school -- has done often recently.
  • A video feature on how Virginia Tech is tackling the challenge of making safer helmets.
Jimbo FisherDon Juan Moore/Getty ImagesJimbo Fisher has been able to attract top recruits to continue Florida State's success.
Alabama and Nick Saban have set the national recruiting pace the past five years, and that won't change in the week leading up to signing day as they close on a fifth consecutive recruiting title.

However, Florida State is not far off, and in Saban’s rearview mirror is the familiar face of his former offensive coordinator, Jimbo Fisher.

Florida State was the last program to finish ahead of Alabama in the rankings (2011), and the Seminoles are the only other team that will have a top-three class for the fourth time in the past five cycles. Their five-year average finish of 3.4 is second to only Alabama's five-year average of 1.6.

That’s why the FSU program is the strongest it has been in the past decade and why there should be optimism among Seminoles fans now that award-winning quarterback Jameis Winston, as well as a bevy of starters, are now off to the NFL.

The reality is 2015 is a transitional period for the Seminoles. Twelve players have left early for the NFL over the past three years. They’re replacing nearly the entire offensive line and their two best receivers, defensive linemen and cornerbacks. And gone, of course, is one of the greatest players in program history.

Two losses in the 2015 season is not out of the question for Florida State, which has lost only once in its past 30 games.

A fourth consecutive ACC championship would be equally unsurprising. There was the thought that Florida State might have missed a championship window in the 2012 season, which ended with two losses. Eleven players were drafted from that team, including five in the first two rounds. It’s hard to compensate for that many meaningful departures.

Of course, the Seminoles went undefeated the next season and went on to claim their first national title since 1999, and did it with key players from Fisher’s first recruiting class.

As many as a dozen former Seminoles could be selected in this upcoming NFL draft. Although that means Florida State is losing a significant amount of talent, it also indicates how well Fisher and his staff are recruiting. It shows the sustained recruiting success that Fisher has had over the course of his five-year tenure, and it’s why blue-chip prospects are stampeding down Interstate 10 toward Tallahassee.

Half of the Seminoles’ 22 commitments are ESPN 300 prospects, and with a few more scholarships remaining, that number figures to grow. The Seminoles have the No. 1 athlete and top-rated safety. They also have top-five players at quarterback, running back, defensive end, cornerback and linebacker.

To replace Winston, Fisher has three ESPN 300 quarterback commits (if including athlete Kai Locksley) to go along with 2014 ESPN 300 signee JJ Cosentino and Sean Maguire, who started in place of Winston against Clemson. Down the line, 2016 No. 1 quarterback Malik Henry plans to leave Southern California and head east to Florida State. (Henry is one of six 2016 FSU commitments, and five are among the top 184 players nationally.)

Although all of those players have the high school credentials, there are countless quarterbacks and high school players who fail to live up to the hype. Fisher has a track record of helping his players realize their potential, which is why the draft numbers have skyrocketed. Winston could be the second No. 1 overall pick Fisher has tutored. (JaMarcus Russell was the first.)

Before Fisher, the Seminoles finished in the top 12 of the rankings in three of Bobby Bowden’s last four recruiting classes, but there were too many misses during those cycles.

Florida State’s ability to develop players has been a key recruiting pitch, and it’s the reason Abdul Bello, No. 4 among offensive tackles, committed to Florida State. The ESPN 300 lineman immigrated to Florida from Nigeria in 2013 and admits he still doesn’t know many of the nuances to the game. He was looking for a coaching staff that would be able to help his raw athleticism mature, and it’s why he said so many top recruits are joining him.

“When those players [from earlier classes] were going there, they were good players, but when they went there … the coaches gave them good coaching,” Bello said. “We’ll get that same great coaching, same attitude, same hunger and that same will to win with this coaching. We’ll be really good.”

Fisher’s recruiting efforts are boosted now that Florida State has joined the college football arms race. The school received cosmetic upgrades recently with a new indoor practice facility and overhauled football offices and locker rooms. The school is also allocating more money to be spent on assistant coaches. The recruiting budget has increased to where the Seminoles are at least competitive with other top schools. Florida State might always struggle to keep up with the Joneses in Tuscaloosa and throughout the SEC, but Fisher has the pivotal pieces in place.

“I'm not a spoiled kid. If I want it, it's because it's going to make our organization better. Every decision we make is about winning and developing our players,” Fisher said not long after FSU unveiled its latest facility upgrades in July. “... I always ask folks, when you walk into an organization, you go into a business, the minute you walk in, you make a first impression: Is this place committed to excellence, is it a championship organization?”

Florida State is one of those organizations now, which is why the future is promising for the Seminoles even with so many unknowns awaiting them in 2015.

video

ACC morning links

January, 28, 2015
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With national signing day closing in, it is hard not to be impressed with the efforts ACC schools have made across the board.

At last check, eight schools are ranked in the ESPN Recruiting Nation Top 40 class rankings. Duke, featured at N0. 39, is poised to sign David Cutcliffe's best class. NC State and Louisville are putting together strong classes, along with usual Top 25 suspects Florida State, Clemson, Miami, North Carolina and Virginia Tech.

Wake Forest coach Dave Clawson is doing work, too. Though the Deacs are not in the rankings, Clawson is quietly putting together a solid class. ESPN 300 prospect Bowman Archibald spurned Miami despite signing a financial aid agreement with the school in August. As he explained when he switched his commitment last September, his on-campus visit impressed him. He is already enrolled at Wake Forest (though he just had surgery for a broken leg).

Another four-star prospect, quarterback Kyle Kearns out of California, committed over the weekend. Then Tuesday, the Deacs scored another big commitment from running back Rocky Reid, a former Tennessee commit.

All three committed after taking official visits. Perhaps that is not a coincidence.



It also should not go unnoticed that Wake Forest has flipped players once committed to schools like Miami and Tennessee. The Deacs can clearly sell early playing time to a player like Reid, who joins a running back group in search of a standout. There also is no depth behind quarterback John Wolford, so coming to Wake to play quarterback should be appealing -- especially if Clawson's past history is taken into consideration.

Though Wake Forest went 3-9, this is a team that improved throughout the course of the season, that played with heart, energy and passion and never quit. Clawson has gotten the players on his roster to believe. Now he is getting recruits to believe as well.

More around the ACC:

Midyear additions: Florida State

January, 27, 2015
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Eight recruits have enrolled at Florida State, according to the program's official site Seminoles.com:

Calvin Brewton, S
HT: 6-0 WT: 173
Positional Rank: No. 29 S
Stars: 4

George Campbell, ATH
HT: 6-4 WT: 190
Positional Rank: No. 1 ATH
Stars: 5
ESPN 300 (No. 7)
Under Armour All-American

Ethan Frith, OT
HT: 6-7 WT: 336
Positional Rank: No. 48 OT in 2014
Stars: 3

Derwin James, S
HT: 6-2 WT: 202
Positional Rank: No. 1 S
Stars: 5
ESPN 300 (No. 8)
Under Armour All-American

De'Andre Johnson, QB-DT
HT: 6-0 WT: 173
Positional Rank: No. 7 QB-DT
Stars: 4
ESPN 300 (No. 259)
Under Armour All-American

Jacques Patrick, RB
HT: 6-3 WT: 233
Positional Rank: No. 3 RB
Stars: 4
ESPN 300 (No. 49)
Under Armour All-American

Da'Vante Phillips, WR
HT: 6-2 WT: 202
Positional Rank: No. 6 WR
Stars: 4
ESPN 300 (No. 44)
Under Armour All-American

Josh Sweat, DE
HT: 6-5 WT: 240
Positional Rank: No. 3 DE
Stars: 5
ESPN 300 (No. 11)
Under Armour All-American
Every team has issues to address this offseason, and this week, we're taking a look at the most glaring holes for each ACC team and figuring out where they might find answers between now and the season opener.

Florida State Seminoles

Position to improve: Linebacker

Why it was a problem: It's not often that a defense can lose a playmaker such as Telvin Smith (and DE/OLB Christian Jones to an extent) and move on without missing a beat. With the talent Jimbo Fisher has recruited, some thought the Seminoles might have minimal drop-off. But the unit had its ups and downs for a variety of reasons. There were injuries and suspensions, and there also a lot of inexperience and not as much athleticism. The linebackers struggled at times against the run and the pass, and there was not a great pass-rusher among the group.

How it can be fixed: A healthy Terrance Smith Jr. will obviously help, and so will a full season from redshirt sophomore Matthew Thomas. Smith battled a sprained knee throughout the second half of the season, and Thomas was suspended for the first six games. The Seminoles need one of their younger linebackers to step up, though, especially with the losses of E.J. Levenberry and Reggie Northrup (ACL surgery). Jacob Pugh played sparingly as a freshman, and Delvin Purifoy never played a down after a season-ending injury. The good news is Pugh, Purifoy and defensive end/linebacker Lorenzo Featherston were all blue-chip recruits in the 2014 class and will have a full year under their belts.

Early 2015 outlook: There are definite reasons for optimism, as Smith and Thomas will be joined by one of the younger players. The 2014 class was filled with talent, and there will be an opportunity for the second-year linebackers to step up. The Seminoles also went the junior college route in the 2015 class with linebacker Lorenzo Phillips. He was the third-ranked outside linebacker among junior college players, and the idea is for him to make an immediate impact. But while the outlook is hardly bleak, one of the younger players has to step up and help the defense return to the top of the national rankings.
So Wake Forest and North Carolina will face off in 2019 and 2021 in games that won’t count in the ACC standings but will reignite a longtime rivalry, writes the Winston-Salem Journal.

As the Journal notes, it’s setting right a wrong done to the two schools due to conference expansion, but it’s also fair to wonder what the longterm ramifications of the deal might be.

Our Andrea Adelson wrote that the two programs deserve credit for taking this relatively unprecedented step to rekindle the rivalry — a step that no doubt will play well with traditionalists eager to see more of those recently deceased rivalries brought back to life.

The move no doubt will also spark some talk about adding a few more nonconference games between ACC teams, with BC Interruption throwing a regular meeting between Boston College and Miami into the discussion.

Elsewhere, Florida State has long coveted a chance to play more routinely in Atlanta, where the Seminoles possess a strong alumni base. NC State and Duke would make a lot of sense, too. In the SEC, where the league has also expanded to 14 teams and added a new rule requiring at least nine games against Power 5 foes, there could be a push for some programs to follow suit, too.

Beyond just those potential geographic rivalries, there’s a potentially significant recruiting impact to seeing cross-divisional foes more routinely, too. Wouldn’t Virginia Tech love to get to play another game in the state of Florida more than once every six years? Or Clemson showing off its offense in South Florida? And certainly Syracuse and BC could stand to steal a few more recruits in Virginia by getting a couple extra games against the Hokies or UVa?

Of course, there are some drawbacks to this, too.

For one, does the UNC-Wake rivalry really spark any more excitement for Tar Heels fans than, say, adding more non-traditional foes to the schedule -- perhaps from the Big Ten or SEC? And for teams like FSU, Clemson and Georgia Tech, who already have a set nonconference rival in the SEC, there’s a hefty financial incentive to keep seven home games each year, which complicates the process significantly.

The bottom line, however, is that conference expansion has played havoc with scheduling just as the College Football Playoff has put teams’ résumés in the spotlight more than ever. Finding some creative ways to fit tradition, finances and résumé-building games together is paramount, and what UNC and Wake have done at least sets a precedent for other programs looking to find some answers to scheduling dilemmas. It’s not an answer to all the problems, but it’s a start.

A few more links:
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It's tough to imagine a more exhausting and stressful conclusion to a recruiting process than the one Iman Marshall orchestrated. Over the past 10 days, Marshall has taken official visits to Florida State, LSU and Michigan, as well as hosted several coaches at his home and school. But just like on the football field, the nation's No. 4 overall prospect doesn't appear to be fazed at all by what's being thrown at him.
It was a banner weekend on the recruiting trail for Dave Doeren and NC State.

The Wolfpack landed four-star tailback Johnny Frasier (Princeton, N.C.), who had been committed to Florida State and hadn’t even had NC State in his top five before the 2014 season began, as the Raleigh News & Observer notes.

Frasier is a big get for Doeren on a number of levels, but the success landing in-state talent may be the biggest takeaway. As Backing the Pack writes, Frasier is the fourth four-star prospect from North Carolina that Doeren has nabbed for this recruiting class, which is a great sign for the future of the program.

For Florida State, the loss was expected, but it means that early enrollee Jacques Patrick is the lone commitment the Seminoles have at running back for 2015, writes the Orlando Sentinel.

On the flip side, three of NC State’s top-five rated commits, according to ESPN, are running backs, and that is already a big position of strength for Doeren’s crew.

In fact, the success of NC State’s ground game in 2014 was one of the most under-the-radar stories of the year. A few tidbits:
  • NC State’s 5.98 yards per carry ranked 13th nationally and eighth among Power 5 teams.
  • Only four Power 5 teams had a lower rate of runs that went for a loss or no gain.
  • Only four Power 5 teams had a better rate of runs going for at least 5 yards, and three of those played in New Years Six bowls.
  • No team in the nation had a higher success rate converting third downs on the ground (66.1 percent).

Creating a more dynamic backfield is the next step for the Wolfpack’s ground game, which garnered the bulk of its productivity on consistency between the 20s, but lacked a home-run threat or a great red-zone runner. Frasier can probably help with the former immediately, but as Tom Luginbill notes, he’ll need to develop a bit more lower-body strength before he’s ready to make an impact with the latter.

A few more links:
  • Florida State’s Tre Jackson won MVP honors for the South team at the Senior Bowl, writes Tomahawk Nation.
  • Miami’s Ladarius Gunter had a strong showing at the Senior Bowl, writes the Miami Herald.
  • Pitt offensive lineman Artie Rowell has been a terrific ambassador for the Panthers and the ACC, writes the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
  • One reason Virginia Tech will be a trendy pick in the Coastal next season is the wealth of returning starters, as the Roanoke Times notes.
  • With DeVante Parker NFL bound, Louisville landed a top recruit at receiver over the weekend, writes The Courier-Journal.
  • USA Today takes a look at how former Clemson offensive coordinator Chad Morris is handling his first month at SMU.
  • Morris’ arrival at SMU sent one QB commit looking elsewhere, and Kyle Kearns has now landed at Wake Forest, writes the Winston-Salem Journal.
It obviously takes talented players to put together a 29-game winning streak.

How talented? Florida State could be in rarefied air once the draft is completed in early May. With a nation-leading five early entrants in the draft, Florida State is on course to have at least 11 players selected.

If that happens, Florida State will have 29 players drafted over the last three years, more than any other team since the draft was cut down to seven rounds in 1994. According to ESPN Stats & Information, the last school that had at least 29 players drafted over a three-year period was Texas, with 31 taken from 1982-84.

Only two programs have had 28 players taken since 2002: Miami (2002-04) and USC (2008-10).

Those Miami teams are widely regarded as among the best all-time at producing NFL talent. Of those 28 drafted, 15 went in the first round. Florida State will not come close to that first-round number, having had four first-round picks in 2013 and 2014 with a handful projected for 2015.

But there is an interesting debate to be had between this recent Florida State stretch that produced a national championship, 29 straight wins and potentially more overall picks, and the Miami stretch that produced a national championship, 34 straight wins and more first-round picks.

Is the 2001 Miami championship team head-and-shoulders above the 2013 Florida State championship team? That question is worth discussion.

What is not up for debate is where this Florida State group stands compared to its other talented teams. This three-year stretch blows any other in school history away. Until now, its most drafted three-year group was 22 from 1993-95.

It goes without saying that coach Jimbo Fisher has done a tremendous job on the recruiting trail. Not only is he signing top-flight classes, he is taken the highly skilled players in those groups and developing them into professional talents at rapid-fire rates. Fisher can boast that better than just about anyone.

Here is a look at the recent three-year stretches Florida State, Miami and USC have put together in the NFL draft:

MIAMI, 2002-04

2002 draftees: 11
First round: Five -- Bryant McKinnie, Jeremy Shockey, Phillip Buchanon, Ed Reed, Mike Rumph

2003 draftees: Eight
First round: Four -- Andre Johnson, Jerome McDougle, Willis McGahee, William Joseph

2004 draftees: Nine
First round: Six -- Sean Taylor, Kellen Winslow, Jonathan Vilma, D.J. Williams, Vernon Carey, Vince Wilfork

USC, 2008-10

2008 draftees: 10
First round: Four -- Sedrick Ellis, Keith Rivers, Sam Baker, Lawrence Jackson

2009 draftees: 11
First round: Three -- Mark Sanchez, Brian Cushing, Clay Matthews

2010 draftees: Seven
First round: None

FLORIDA STATE, 2013-15

2013 draftees: 11
First round: Three -- EJ Manuel, Bjoern Werner, Xavier Rhodes

2014 draftees: Seven
First round: One -- Kelvin Benjamin.

2015 draftees: TBD
Most likely to be drafted: Jameis Winston, Eddie Goldman, P.J. Williams, Mario Edwards Jr., Ronald Darby, Cameron Erving, Josue Matias, Karlos Williams, Rashad Greene, Nick O'Leary, Tre' Jackson
The end of our countdown has finally arrived. Here are the ACC's top five players of the 2014 season.

To see the full list, click here.

1. James Conner, Pittsburgh
Position: Running back
Year: Sophomore
Tough to go with anybody else at No. 1 after watching Conner bulldoze the competition en route to ACC Offensive Player of the Year and ACC Player of the Year honors. And, well, it is not every day that Tony Dorsett's long-standing school records are shattered. Conner led the league in rushing yards (1,765), rushing touchdowns (26), rushing yards per game (135.8) and scoring (156 points). His touchdown and scoring totals broke the Pitt single-season records Dorsett set in 1976. Conner had three 200-yard games and seven 100-yard games, often taking multiple defenders on his back along for a ride. He was downright dominant, and in a year of powerful backs, he deserves the No. 1 spot.

2. Jameis Winston, Florida State
Position: Quarterback
Year: Redshirt sophomore
If there is one player on this list you would take with the game on the line, it would be Winston. But this list is an evaluation of the top performances week in and week out, and Winston was simply not consistent enough to merit the top spot this year. He made too many mistakes, whether he was trying too hard with an inexperienced receiving corps or just making the wrong decisions. But those mistakes do not diminish the fact that Winston remains one of the best (and most dangerous) players in the nation. Winston ended the season with an ACC-leading 3,907 yards passing, 25 touchdowns and 18 interceptions, all down from a year ago. But he did lead Florida State to a third straight ACC title and a spot in the College Football Playoff.

3. Vic Beasley, Clemson
Position: Defensive end
Year: Senior
Beasley returned to school for his senior season and was even better -- despite facing more double- and triple-teams than at any point in his career. He won ACC Defensive Player of the Year honors and was a finalist for the Bednarik and Lombardi awards after racking up a team-high 21.5 tackles for loss, a team-high 12 sacks, nine quarterback pressures, three pass breakups and two forced fumbles. Nobody in the ACC was better off the edge than Beasley, and he was a nightmare for many teams to block.

4. Duke Johnson, Miami
Position: Running back
Year: Junior
Johnson had the best season of his career because he was able to stay healthy and play all 13 games, finishing second behind Conner in the ACC in rushing with 1,652 yards. But Johnson led the league in all-purpose yards with 2,073, emerging as a much bigger pass-catching threat out of the backfield. When the season ended, he stood above all the other Miami greats on the career rushing and all-purpose yards lists. But maybe most impressive of all, he averaged 7.4 yards every time he touched the ball.

5. Gerod Holliman, Louisville
Position: Safety
Year: Redshirt sophomore
There were plenty of questions about the Louisville secondary heading into the season, following the loss of Hakeem Smith and Calvin Pryor, two of the best players on the 2013 defense. But Holliman stepped right into the starting lineup and made an immediate impact in Todd Grantham's 3-4 scheme, using his athleticism to make plays all over the field. When it was over, Holliman had tied an NCAA record with 14 interceptions and won the Jim Thorpe Award as the best defensive back in college football.
The talent across the ACC was plainly evident this past season, so it comes as no surprise that multiple players have made a major impression this week during Senior Bowl practices in Mobile, Alabama.

Among those drawing the most praise: Duke teammates Jamison Crowder and Laken Tomlinson, Pitt offensive lineman T.J. Clemmings, Clemson linebacker Stephone Anthony and all four Miami players represented: tight end Clive Walford, receiver Phillip Dorsett, linebacker Denzel Perryman and cornerback Ladarius Gunter. Phil Savage, executive director of the Senior Bowl, tweeted out practice award winners for the week Friday morning. Tomlinson, Anthony and Dorsett were honored.

ESPN NFL draft analyst Todd McShay wrote this week that Dorsett's stock is on the rise, and he helped himself more than any other prospect during the week. His track speed has wowed scouts across the board. As McShay writes:
What stands out with Dorsett is that he has under-control speed. Some guys are burners in a straight line but can't gear down or get in and out of breaks under control enough to catch the ball. That isn't the case with Dorsett, who possesses every quality you want in a deep speed threat.

During the East-West Shrine game last week, former Miami defensive lineman Anthony Chickillo also turned heads. In all, five Miami players have made headlines in the last week for their play, leaving many once again to wonder how the Canes went 6-7 with so much talent. Add in running back Duke Johnson and offensive tackle Ereck Flowers, and the potential exists for at least seven players off this team to get drafted.

Dorsett told ESPN.com Miami Dolphins reporter James Walker, “A lot of things didn’t go our way last year. I can say that,” Dorsett said. “A lot of things went the wrong way. We just got to get guys to really buy in. It’s not on the coaches, it’s on the players. Coaches coach and players got to go out there and play. That’s all I can really say about it.”

Earlier in the week, NFL Network expert Mike Mayock said Tomlinson and Crowder were the players of the day. The Chicago Sun-Times had a good profile detailing the friendship between Tomlinson and high school teammate Louis Trinca-Pasat, both at the Senior Bowl.

Two more who also have had a good week: Al.com notes Lorenzo Mauldin of Louisville made an impression, and Clemson defensive tackle Grady Jarrett has made some plays despite his size being scrutinized.

Charles Davis of NFL Network said of Stephone Anthony, "He's a big-time player. Not many people around the country know enough about him."

Elsewhere around the ACC:
  • Boston College offensive coordinator Ryan Day has been hired as the Philadelphia Eagles' quarterbacks coach.
  • Florida State has reportedly hired former Florida assistant Brad Lawing to replace departed defensive line coach Sal Sunseri, who is off to the Raiders.
  • Louisville will host six players on official visits this weekend.
  • Two former North Carolina student-athletes, including football player Devon Ramsey, have sued the university and NCAA over the long-running academic fraud scandal that involved the athletic department.
  • NC State coach Dave Doeren discusses the progress his program has made since he arrived.
  • Pitt coach Pat Narduzzi picked up his third commitment in two days.
  • Virginia Tech unveiled its plans to cover cost of attendance with the Pylons of Promise.
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There are less than two weeks until national signing day, and five-star defensive end Byron Cowart is closing on his college decision. The No. 1-ranked player in the ESPN 300 had a top three of Auburn, Florida, and Florida State just last week, and now the 6-foot-3, 258-pound defensive end has dwindled his choices to two.

"I would have to say, just to be honest, Auburn and Florida are my top two schools," Cowart said. "I have to keep it professional -- I have to. Who knows, you see coaches and they go into the league, and when it’s time for you to get drafted you don’t want to have a bad name.

"A lot of guys say things that they back away from, and yeah I probably said 'yeah I like this school and I might end up coming here' but that’s probably how I was feeling at the time, but a lot of things happen and I just want people to know that I’m man enough to say 'thank you for recruiting me, but I might not go to your school.' But right now, truly, it will come down to Auburn and Florida. That’s just being honest."

That is somewhat of a surprise considering FSU coaches visited Cowart at his school on Wednesday afternoon and Cowart was scheduled to take his last visit to Florida State next weekend.

"The visit was good. It was different," Cowart said. "I haven’t had the heat put to me like that before. It’s crunch time, so they want me to come up for this last visit, but it’s like I already know what they can bring to the table, I already know what I can I get from Florida State the school. It’s just crazy, I just want to relax and get away, think and get my thoughts together, and that’s why I was like 'I don’t know if I’m going to do my last visit -- I don’t know if I’m going to go anywhere on my last visit.'

"I don’t want to make a mistake. Like my mom said, when you are rushing and you’re moving too fast sometimes you can make a mistake and go somewhere that you never even thought you would go. So I want to be in the right mind and be focused, and to know that this is the school I want to go to."


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