Looking at the hoops committee model


AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. -- One of the biggest takeaways from the ACC spring meetings was what the league coaches want to see done with the football selection committee for the future playoff.

They prefer the committee to resemble the model used in basketball to select the NCAA tournament field, and also prefer that people currently affiliated with the sport serve on the committee.

Could that work in football? There really is no better person to ask than Georgia Tech athletic director Mike Bobinski, who has served as chairman of the NCAA men's basketball tournament selection committee the past two years.

"Without fleshing out a little more fully the criteria we want to use as a sport to select those teams for the playoff -- I think you need to do a little bit more of that before you figure out what the right makeup of those people are," Bobinski told ESPN.com. "But having served on the basketball committee, I like the model. I think it’s really evolved over time so if the football model borrowed from that, it would be borrowing from an evolved model and not something that we’re still figuring out.

"I think there can be a lot of transferability. It’s a different challenge for sure. There’s a different focus and a different sort of level of intensity over what the football group will be doing, but I do think there’s a lot of commonality and approach in the process. A lot of it will make some sense, so I think there is a good starting point to transition into the football model."

What does he think about the idea of having only people currently in the game serve on the committee?

"Having that current expertise and knowledge is really important. I also think having folks that have been in and around the sport and spent a lifetime in it can add value, maybe in an advisory capacity, maybe structure it in a way that if they’re not full voting members they provide perspective and background that might be helpful to the committee’s work," Bobinski said. "I know from the basketball committee’s perspective, many of us in the room did that on our own. We would reach out to people who had been long-time coaches or folks who had been in and around the sport and got their opinions, got their thoughts and that just added to our own deliberations and our own perspective and knowledge. I wouldn’t want to discount folks that have spent a lifetime in and around the game. It would be foolish to do that."