Four ACC teams honored for APR scores

May, 7, 2014
May 7
2:00
PM ET
Boston College, Clemson, Duke and Georgia Tech earned NCAA Public Recognition Awards for their football teams' academic progress, the NCAA announced Tuesday.

Each school posted scores in the top 10 percent of all FBS programs in the Academic Progress Rate, a real-time measure of eligibility and retention of student-athletes competing on every Division I sports team. The most recent APR scores are based on results from the 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 academic years.

The ACC had the most football teams from its 2012-13 membership recognized among the power five conferences. The Big Ten also had four if you count future league member Rutgers, which joins in July. In all, 13 schools were honored with the awards.

APRs for all Division I teams will be released on May 14. Here are a few nuggets about the four schools honored:
  • All four schools won public recognition honors last year as well. Duke is the only FBS football program to receive a public recognition award in each year the APR has been in existence.
  • Clemson has been honored with a public recognition award for four consecutive seasons. Clemson and Duke are two of five FBS programs ranked in the top 10 percent each of the last four years. Boise State, Northwestern and Rutgers are the others. In addition, Clemson is the only FBS program to finish each of the last three seasons in the top 25 of both polls on the field, and in the top 10 percent of APR scores.
  • Georgia Tech has improved its APR every year under coach Paul Johnson, and this year matched its score from last year of 983.
  • Notre Dame led the ACC’s 15 current member institutions with 15 public recognition awards. Duke was next with 14, followed by Boston College (12), North Carolina (six), Miami and Virginia with five each, and Georgia Tech with four.

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