ACC's lunch links

July, 1, 2014
7/01/14
12:00
PM ET
Huge day in the sports world on this first day of July, and that includes the ACC.

What? You thought the World Cup was the only thing going?

Two big stories to follow across the league. Unfortunately for the ACC, they fall on opposite ends of the spectrum. On the day the ACC officially welcomes Louisville , the league has to deal with the unwelcome news that North Carolina is once again under NCAA investigation. There is no doubt there is joy across Louisville and the rest of the ACC -- check the #Cards2ACC hashtag Twitter for all the welcome messages -- as the Cardinals have risen up from Conference USA players to the big leagues over a 10-year span.

It was just two years ago, even, that many thought the ACC was on the verge of implosion when Florida State boosters started chattering about the Big 12. But John Swofford found a way to not only keep the league together but make it stronger.

This should be a day for celebration.

But then there is North Carolina, living under the taint of scandal over the past four years. Swofford's alma mater was in the headlines for all the wrong reasons Monday, when the NCAA announced it would reopen its investigation into academic fraud at the university. The ACC will proudly tell you it has five schools ranked in the top 30 of the latest U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges rankings. North Carolina is one of them.

Yet, the university has admitted that sham courses were offered in its now disgraced African- and Afro-American Studies department. Both athletes and non-athletes benefited, a big reason why the NCAA shied away from the scandal in the first place. But the NCAA believes others who were reticent to speak up before may do so now. And then there are the recent comments from Rashad McCants, who claims he was kept eligible thanks to sham courses.

Bottom line: the NCAA had no choice but to take another look at some pretty serious allegations about academic impropriety. North Carolina is conducting yet another internal investigation, one that has yielded more than 1.5 million emails for review and now stretches back to the 1980s.

What does it all mean? Hard to tell at this point. Luke DeCock at the Raleigh News & Observer points out the long, and twisted turns that have taken North Carolina from agent scandal to academic fraud, noting the end appears nowhere in site. Meanwhile, the whistleblower at North Carolina who claimed some student-athletes were functionally illiterate, has filed a civil suit against the school.

It is yet another ugly day in Chapel Hill. But over in Louisville, the sun shines brightly on a promising future ahead. What a dichotomy.

As for the rest of the league ...

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