ACC's lunch links: Clemson's tempo

July, 17, 2014
Jul 17
12:00
PM ET
Tajh Boyd is gone. Sammy Watkins is gone. Martavis Bryant is gone. But if you think that means Clemson's up-tempo offense will also disappear, you'd be wrong, says Dabo Swinney.

From The State:
Watkins left school a season early and was picked No. 4 by the Buffalo Bills while Boyd was taken in the sixth round by the New York Jets this past May -- opening up two high-profile spots on last year's eighth-ranked Tigers.

For those returning, the message is clear, says offensive coordinator Chad Morris: “To prove that we weren't a two-man show.”

Tempo is a buzzword around college football, of course, and few places have done it better than Clemson.

Morris, Boyd and Watkins all came aboard in 2011. In the three years previous, Clemson averaged 65 plays per game and one play every 26.7 seconds of possession time. In the three years Morris, Boyd and Watkins were together, the Tigers averaged 79 plays per game (a 22 percent increase) and one play every 21.4 seconds of possession time (a 20 percent improvement).

But just how much of an impact has the up-tempo offense had for the Tigers?

On the offensive side, that 20 percent increase in plays has translated to a 42 percent increase in points per game. Obviously some of that is attributable to better talent -- Boyd and Watkins were historically good players at Clemson -- but a lot has to do with simply having more chances to score, too.

The flip side of that, however, is on defense. Again, talent plays a role here, but in the three years before Morris, Boyd and Watkins arrived, Clemson allowed an average of 19 points per game. In the three years since, the Tigers have coughed up 26 points per game -- a 35 percent increase that, obviously, offsets a big chunk of the offensive improvement. That up-tempo offense has meant that Clemson, despite losing just eight of its 40 games in the past three years, has spent roughly four more minutes of action on defense than on offense per game during that stretch.

All of this brings us to 2014, when the offense is in transition without its superstars, and the defense is expected to be the backbone of the team. If that's to be the case, is keeping that same offensive tempo really the best way to go?

At the end of the day, Morris is going to coach the way he always has, and Cole Stoudt is a veteran who knows the system well enough to execute the offense with some precision. But Clemson's strengths will be the D-line and a deep corps of runners, and it's probably fair to wonder if Morris just may tweak things a little more than he's letting on.

More links:

Morris says freshman QB Deshaun Watson will see the field in Clemson's opener against Georgia, according to TigerNet.com.

Just because Marquise Williams is headed to ACC media days doesn't mean he's UNC's starting QB, writes the Charlotte Observer.

FSU legend Derrick Brooks was back on campus this week while his son attended Jimbo Fisher's football camp, writes the Tallahassee Democrat.

There's been plenty of preseason love for defenders at Virginia Tech and Virginia, writes The Roanoke Times.

The Macon Telegraph previews Miami's 2014 season with CaneSports.com's Gary Ferman (Warning: audio, not print).

BC Interruption runs the numbers to see which teams have done the best job of meeting media expectations in recent years — though I think it's more a critique of the media's predictions.

Non-ACC link of the day: AL.com has a profile of the most inquisitive reporter at SEC media days.

Non-sports link of the day: Philly knows how to make great art.

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