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Monday, October 6, 2008
ACC's Players of the Week

By ESPN.com staff
ESPN.com

Posted by ESPN.com's Heather Dinich

The ACC announced its Player of the Week honors, as voted on by the media:

OFFENSIVE BACK -- Chris Crane, Boston College, QB, 6-4, 239, Sr., Mechanicsburg, Pa.
Crane accounted for all five of BC's touchdowns when he completed 34-of-51 passes for a career-best 428 yards and two touchdowns and also led the Eagles in rushing with 11 caries for 42 yards and three touchdowns. Crane accounted for 470 of BC's 578 total net yards in the win over Atlantic Division rival NC State and former head coach Tom O'Brien. When NC State tied the game at 31-31 with 3:24 remaining, Crane led the Eagles on a 7-play, 70-yard drive in 3:01, highlighted by a 36-yard completion to tight end Lars Anderson and a 13-yard scamper to the end zone with 23 seconds left in the game that sealed the BC victory. Crane accounted for three touchdowns in the first quarter alone as the Eagles took a 21-7 lead into the second quarter.

OFFENSIVE LINEMAN -- Rodney Hudson, Florida State, T, 6-2, 290, So., Mobile, Ala.
Hudson helped lead the FSU ground game to 281 rushing yards versus a Miami defense that was allowing an average of just 65 yards per game on the ground. Hudson led a young offensive line that paved the way for FSU quarterback Christian Ponder to rush for 144 yards, the second-most rushing yards by a quarterback in the history of the program. Not only did he open holes for Smith on his four touchdown runs and for Ponder on his career rushing day, he was a key factor in limiting the Hurricanes to zero sacks. UM came into the game with nine sacks on the season but was unable to record one against the Seminoles.

DEFENSIVE LINEMAN -- Clint Sintim, Virginia, OLB, 6-3, 254, Sr., Woodbridge, Va.
Sintim had another disruptive performance as the Cavaliers posted a shutout of Maryland. He tied his season high with seven tackles, including six solo. Sintim sacked Maryland quarterback Chris Turner for an 11-yard loss on a key third-down play from midfield in the third quarter to force a Maryland punt. He now has five sacks this season and leads the ACC. Sintim also had a pass deflection. Virginia held Maryland to just 79 yards rushing, well below its season average (182.4) and by far its lowest total of the season and under 100 yards for the first time all year. Overall Maryland's 302 yards of total offense was 62 yards less than its season average.

DEFENSIVE BACK -- Tony Carter, Florida State, DB, 5-9, 166, Sr., Jacksonville, Fla.
Carter recorded multiple interceptions for the second week in a row. Carter picked off Miami's Robert Marve in the first quarter, which led to the Seminoles' first touchdown of the game and then again in the fourth quarter on a deep pass on 4th-and-6 to thwart a potential Miami touchdown. He also had four solo tackles in the game.

SPECIALIST -- Bruce Carter, North Carolina, OLB, 6-3, 230, So., Havelock, N.C.
Sophomore linebacker Bruce Carter set an ACC single-game record by blocking three punts -- all in the second quarter -- in the win over No. 24 Connecticut. His third block was recovered in the end zone for a touchdown by Matt Merletti. Carter also recorded seven tackles, including two tackles for losses and a pass deflection. Carter also tied a school record for blocked punts in a season with four to match Bracey Walker's 1993 total. Carter may have done something no other player in NCAA history has accomplished -- blocking four consecutive punts, including the last one at Miami and UConn's first three. The NCAA does not keep records on consecutive blocked kicks.

ROOKIE -- Jaybo Shaw, Georgia Tech, QB, 6-0, 190, Fr., Flowery Branch, Ga.
Shaw, a true freshman starting in place of injured Josh Nesbitt, had more yards passing (230) than any Tech quarterback in their first career start. Shaw, who ran for one touchdown and passed for another, was 9-of-13 passing for 230 yards, including an 88-yard touchdown pass to Demaryius Thomas -- the third-longest pass play in Tech history.