ACC: Kalvin Cline

Virginia Tech’s tight ends have made a big difference for the Hokies’ offense so far this season, writes The Roanoke Times.

Bucky Hodges and Ryan Malleck have been excellent, and even without Kalvin Cline, the only tight end to catch a pass for the Hokies last season, the position has been a big plus through two games.

I noted the significant uptick in tight end targets earlier this week, too, in our stats column, but here are a few more tidbits worth passing along:
  • Virginia Tech’s tight ends have combined for 163 receiving yards so far this season -- the fifth-most by any team in the country.
  • The 23 targets for the Hokies’ tight ends ranks third nationally, trailing only Oregon State and Penn State. The Hokies have only targeted their wide receivers 27 times so far this year.
  • Among teams targeting tight ends at least 15 times so far this season, only Purdue and UAB’s position groups have caught a higher percentage of passes thrown their way.
  • Among ACC teams, only Louisville comes close to the Hokies in terms of targeting its tight ends. The Cardinals have thrown to tight ends 21 times. That makes sense since Louisville has a star tight end in Gerald Christian and is playing without its top receiver in Devante Parker.
  • Syracuse should have its tight end, Josh Parris, back in time for the Maryland game next week, writes The Post-Standard. That’s good news for the Orange, who targeted a tight end just twice in their opener.

Other tight end production around the ACC through two weeks:

Wake Forest -- 14 targets
Florida State -- 12
Miami -- 10
UNC -- 8
NC State -- 8
Duke -- 8
Clemson -- 8
Pitt -- 5
Virginia -- 4
Boston College -- 0
Georgia Tech -- 0

A few more links:

Tight ends key for Hokies' passing game

August, 20, 2014
Aug 20
12:00
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Bucky Hodges doesn't want to give away any secrets, but it's hard to have much of a poker face at the moment.

As Virginia Tech looks to turn a listless passing attack into a more dynamic offense, the 6-foot-6 Hodges has all the makings of an ideal secret weapon, but he's doing his best to stay mum on the subject. He remains vague on how often he'll be split out wide or how he might be utilized in the red zone.

But that sly grin tells the story.

"I'm learning a lot of places [on the field], I'll say that," Hodges finally admitted. "It's really exciting to me."

It's exciting for the Hokies' offense, too, which lacked options last season as the running game stumbled and the passing attack underperformed. Frank Beamer thinks the tight end position perfectly underscores what could be different in 2014.

When Beamer hired offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler last year, part of the plan was to get the tight ends more involved in the game plan. At Loeffler's previous stops, the position had been a fixture in the passing game. At Florida in 2009, Temple in 2011 and Auburn in 2012, a tight end either led the team in receiving or finished second each year.

But before the 2013 season could even kick off, starting tight end Ryan Malleck went down with a rotator cuff injury and was lost for the year, and so, too, were Loeffler's big plans for the position.

True freshman Kalvin Cline, a former basketball player with little football experience, was Virginia Tech's only real option at the position, and the numbers by year's end were hardly overwhelming. The Hokies were 10th in the ACC in percentage of pass attempts to its tight ends.

"Last year we had one guy with a year of high school football to now three guys you feel you can split them out," Beamer said. "They're tough enough to get in there and block but you can split them out and get matched up on a lesser athlete."

That's another reason for Hodges' grin.

Basketball was his first love, and he thrived in the sport throughout high school. He's found playing tight end involves a similar skill set -- going after the ball at the height of its arc, playing physical but also making guys miss -- but there is one distinct difference.

"In basketball, you've got somebody big on you," Hodges said. "Now you get moved out and got a little guy on you, you've got some mismatches."

And mismatches are what the Hokies are looking for as they try to jump start a passing offense that finished 85th in completion percentage and ranked 101st in QB rating in the red zone a season ago.

Beamer is thrilled with the early performance of his freshmen receivers, and he thinks sophomore Joshua Stanford has made nice strides, too. The running backs remain a work in progress, however, and the QB battle has yet to produce a clear winner.

All of that leads back to the tight ends and that plan Loeffler had from the outset with Virginia Tech. In a year in which the Hokies are trying to establish their offensive identity, the tight ends offer an option they simply didn't have during last year's struggles.

And that, too, is enough to get Hodges excited about what might be in store.

"I feel like we're a lot more dynamic," he said. "We've got some receivers coming back and now we have tight ends. We've got a lot of playmakers."
The 2013 signing class has already made its mark on the ACC, from Tyler Boyd and Stacy Coley shining on offense to Jalen Ramsey and Kendall Fuller starring on defense to Ryan Switzer racking up All-America honors on special teams. But for most players, the transition from high school to college takes a little time, and it’s not until Year 2 that they truly shine. With that in mind, we’re taking a look at the best candidates for second-year stardom in the conference -- the players who didn’t quite hit the big time as true freshmen, but are poised for a breakthrough in 2014.

See our previous projections here.

Next up: Virginia Tech.

[+] EnlargeWyatt Teller
John Albright/Icon SMIWyatt Teller was a four-star recruit in the 2013 class as a defensive lineman.
Class recap: The Hokies pulled in the No. 20 recruiting class in the nation, with four commitments from ESPN 300 players and 10 overall four-star prospects. Defensive backs Fuller and Brandon Facyson made an immediate impact, combining for 11 interceptions to help solidify the secondary. Fuller was the ACC Rookie of the Year and a first-team Freshman All-America selection; Facyson was a second-team Freshman All-America pick. Jonathan McLaughlin became the first true freshman to start the season opener at left tackle under Frank Beamer, and ended up starting all 13 games. But of the four ESPN 300 players signed, only two were with the team last season. Safety Holland Fisher went to Fork Union last year and will enroll at Virginia Tech this summer; Cequan Jefferson went the prep route and will now go to Temple.

Second-year star: OG Wyatt Teller.

Recruiting stock: ESPN Recruiting Nation rated Teller a four-star recruit out of high school, where he played on the defensive line. Teller started his Virginia Tech career on that side of the ball, but quickly moved to the offensive line during fall practice last year to help with depth concerns. He stayed on the offensive line and ended up redshirting.

2014 potential: Teller ended the spring as the starting left guard, as coaches were impressed with the athleticism he brings to the position. It's no secret the Hokies are in desperate need to shake up their offensive line after subpar results in the run game the last several seasons. Whether Teller ends up in the starting lineup remains to be seen, but it seems pretty clear Teller will provide much-needed help to this group.

Also watch for: DT Woody Baron played in all 13 games last year as a true freshman and will be expected to make major contributions this season at the spot Derrick Hopkins leaves behind. Baron missed spring after ankle surgery, but will be ready for fall practice. TE Kalvin Cline started seven games last season with 26 catches for 321 yards and two touchdowns. Coaches said this spring that tight end will be a much bigger point of emphasis in the offense this season. WR Carlis Parker is a speedster still learning the position, but he has great potential.

Breaking down the spring in the ACC Coastal division:

Duke

Spring practice over

What we learned:
  • Momentum rolls on. It's hard to believe the Blue Devils are already done with spring ball, but coach David Cutcliffe opted to open practice in February to capitalize on the momentum that was created last season. After the spring game ended Saturday, he praised the way his players handled the practices. There was a great deal of retention and not a lot of re-teaching, so coaches were able to get much more out of their players this spring.
  • Max McCaffrey emerges. Jamison Crowder had a spectacular 2013 season, but it was essentially him and then everybody else in the receiver group. That may not be the case this season. McCaffrey earned praise from coaches and teammates for the way he improved during the spring. Offensive coordinator Scottie Montgomery said McCaffrey made as many plays as anybody else on the offense this spring.
  • Stepping up on the line. The Blue Devils lost three starters on their defensive line -- both ends in Kenny Anunike and Justin Foxx, and defensive tackle Sydney Sarmiento. But it appears as if the players behind them are ready to step up and make a seamless transition. Defensive ends Jordan DeWalt-Ondijo and Dezmond Johnson each had two sacks in the spring game. Kyler Brown also made the switch from linebacker to defensive end and had a sack in the spring game as well.
Georgia Tech

Spring start: March 24

Spring game: April 18

What to watch:
  • Justin Thomas takes over. After Vad Lee announced his transfer from Georgia Tech, the quarterback reigns fell to Thomas, who played in 10 games this season. The Jackets had their share of highs and lows under Lee, but what the staff is going to be looking for first and foremost is Thomas’ ability to hold on to the football. Georgia Tech had 24 giveaways and ranked No. 12 in the ACC in turnover margin.
  • Defensive line questions. The Jackets lose three starters on the defensive line, including All-ACC defensive end Jeremiah Attaochu -- who had 22.5 sacks over the last two seasons. Who will step up and fill that type of production? The most experienced backups returning are sophomores Tyler Stargel and Patrick Gamble. Also, Travin Henry will get a look at defensive end after playing wide receiver last season.
  • Offensive line questions. Georgia Tech also loses three starters on the offensive line -- tackles Ray Beno and Will Jackson and center Jay Finch. The trio combined to start 117 games in their careers, so there is no doubt this is going to be a much less experienced unit in 2014. The good news is All-ACC guard Shaq Mason returns to help anchor the new-look line.
Miami

Spring start: Started March 1

Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Quarterback derby. Stephen Morris is gone, but the Canes do have at least one experienced quarterback on the roster in Ryan Williams, a Memphis transfer who has served as Morris’ backup the last two seasons. As a true freshman with the Tigers, Williams started 10 games -- all the way back in 2010. Challenging Williams is redshirt freshman Kevin Olsen, who had a bit of a rocky first year in Miami, along with Gray Crow.
  • Defensive improvements. Perhaps more than what happens at quarterback, Miami must see improvements out of its defense this season. Embattled defensive coordinator Mark D’Onofrio kept his job but the status quo cannot persist. Every single area of the defense must be upgraded. Ranking No. 13 in the ACC in total defense just can’t happen again.
  • Defensive improvements, Part II. To try and help the secondary, Miami already moved Dallas Crawford over to safety, where the Canes could use the help. But Miami must be stronger on the defensive front. The Canes only had 12 sacks in eight conference games. By comparison, BC led the way with 25 sacks in conference games. This is a big opportunity for guys like Al-Quadin Muhammad, Tyriq McCord and Ufomba Kamalu to really step up.
North Carolina

Spring start: Started March 5

Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • The quarterbacks. Marquise Williams took over as the starter when Bryn Renner was gone for the season and ended up helping the Tar Heels make a bowl game after a 1-5 start. But coach Larry Fedora said the competition is open this spring. Look for Mitch Trubisky and Kanler Coker to give Williams a major push.
  • Defensive line questions. Kareem Martin and Tim Jackson are both gone, leaving big holes in the North Carolina front. Martin ended up notching 21.5 tackles for loss to rank No. 3 in the ACC. So who are the next guys up? At end, Junior Gnonkonde and Jessie Rogers are the top two contenders, while Shawn Underwood, Devonte Brown and Justin Thomason will compete for one of the tackle spots.
  • Replacing Ebron. Eric Ebron was dynamic at tight end for the Tar Heels last season, leading the team with 62 receptions for 973 yards, while adding three touchdowns. Will the Tar Heels be able to replace that type of production with just one player? Jack Tabb would be next in line among the tight ends, but this is a huge opportunity for the North Carolina receiving group as well. We saw plenty of promise out of young guys like Bug Howard, T.J. Thorpe and Ryan Switzer.
Pitt

Spring start: March 16

Spring game: No spring game. Last day of practice April 13

What to watch:
  • The quarterbacks. Chad Voytik played really well in relief of an injured Tom Savage in the bowl game, but coach Paul Chryst said the competition to win the starting job is open headed into the spring. At this point, Voytik and Trey Anderson are the only scholarship quarterbacks on the roster. So you can bet the biggest goal of all is to keep them both healthy.
  • Replacing Aaron Donald. One of the biggest surprises in all of college football this past season was the emergence and utter dominance of Donald at defensive tackle. Donald swept every major defensive award after notching 28.5 tackles for loss, 11 sacks, 16 quarterback hurries and four forced fumbles. Darryl Render is the next man up.
  • Complementary receiver. Devin Street is gone, leaving Tyler Boyd as the only standout receiver on the roster. Not only do the Panthers have to develop a consistent No. 2 receiver, they also have to develop some depth. Watch for Manasseh Garner, a former H-back who moved to receiver late last season when Street got hurt. He is more physical than Boyd, and has some extended playing experience.
Virginia

Spring start: Started March 1

Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • The quarterbacks. David Watford is not guaranteed to win his starting job back after last season, when he threw eight touchdown passes to 15 interceptions. Greyson Lambert and Matt Johns are also in the mix and reps with the first team will be split. In fact, Lambert got the first-team reps when the Hoos opened spring ball last weekend.
  • Andrew Brown. The highly-touted freshman will have every opportunity to win a starting job at defensive tackle, and it all starts in spring ball. The No. 3-ranked player in the ESPN 300 comes in with tons of hype; now can he translate that into on-field success? He, Donte Wilkins and Chris Brathwaite will be competing to start next to David Dean.
  • Mr. McGee. Jake McGee was the best player the Hoos had among the group of tight ends and receivers a year ago, leading the team with 43 catches for 395 yards. This spring, McGee has now moved over to receiver so the Hoos can take advantage of his athletic ability. Plus, Virginia is lacking playmakers at the position, so we’ll see how much this move benefits both McGee and the offense.
Virginia Tech

Spring start: March 27

Spring game: April 26

What to watch:
  • Quarterback. Mark Leal heads into the spring with a leg up in the quarterback competition but make no mistake, there is no set starter. He will get competition from freshmen Andrew Ford and Brenden Motley in the spring, with freshman Chris Durkin and Texas Tech transfer Michael Brewer arriving in summer. This competition will likely drag on into the fall.
  • Front seven. The Hokies are losing five terrific players up front, including ends James Gayle and J.R. Collins, and linebacker Jack Tyler, who racked up 100 tackles in back-to-back seasons. There is no doubt a major priority this spring is finding their replacements and building depth along the line and at linebacker. Who will step up as the leader of this group with Tyler gone?
  • Skill players. This has been an ongoing theme over the last two seasons and will continue to be a theme until the Hokies have consistently good players at running back and receiver. Offensive coordinator Scot Loeffler is excited about the return of tight end Ryan Malleck, and his entire tight end group for that matter. A healthy Malleck and improvement from Kalvin Cline means the Hokies could simultaneously improve their run and pass game.

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