Miami Dolphins halftime notes

September, 8, 2013
9/08/13
2:40
PM ET
CLEVELAND -- The Miami Dolphins trail the Cleveland Browns, 7-6, at halftime.

Here are some notes at intermission:
  • Miami’s defense got off to a fast start. The Dolphins forced three interceptions in the first half off Browns starting quarterback Brandon Weeden. The first was a deep ball that floated in the air for Miami cornerback Nolan Carroll. The second and third interceptions were off dropped balls that were tipped for Dolphins cornerback Dimitri Patterson, who is a former Brown. The Dolphins focused all training camp on creating turnovers. They are doing a good job so far, despite the late touchdown allowed in the first half.
  • But the biggest issue is Miami's offense didn't capitalize on Cleveland's mistakes. The Dolphins' defense forced three turnovers, and Miami only scored three points off those errors. Dolphins rookie kicker Caleb Sturgis has been money so far. He nailed two field goals in the first half -- of 45 and 49 yards -- for all of Miami’s points. Sturgis also has one touchback in the first half.
  • It’s been mixed results so far from Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill. He is 12-of-18 passing for 98 yards and an interception. Tannehill’s interception came off a bad read where he failed to see Browns linebacker D'Qwell Jackson underneath in coverage. Jackson tipped the pass and it was picked off by Cleveland safety Tashaun Gipson. But Tannehill also has made several nice completions. His best throw was to tight end Charles Clay for 20 yards in the middle of the field.
  • Cleveland defensive lineman Desmond Bryant sacked Tannehill twice in the second quarter. He now has at least one sack in five straight games, dating to last season. The Browns have three sacks in the first half on Tannehill.

It's still a close and competitive game. Check back with the Dolphins page on ESPN.com for post-game reaction.

James Walker | email

ESPN Miami Dolphins reporter

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