Halftime Report: Miami 6, New York Jets 0

December, 1, 2013
12/01/13
2:55
PM ET
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- It was a tale of two stagnant offenses. The Dolphins finally broke a scoreless tie with 44 seconds left in the second quarter with a 34-yard field goal, and followed it up with another 39 seconds later when Dannell Ellerbe intercepted Jets quarterback Geno Smith.

The Jets' offense, meanwhile, couldn’t do much of anything. There were just two first downs in the first half, a 12-yard catch from TE Kellen Winslow Jr. and a 2-yard pass to Stephen Hill. Smith was awful and threw for just 29 yards on four completions.

FOURTH-AND-NOTHING: Miami went for it on two fourth-and-1 situations and came up short both times. The first was to Jets CB Dee Milliner’s credit, as he broke up a pass to Miami WR Brian Hartline. On the second, a yard short of the end zone with two minutes left in the second half, Jets LB DeMario Davis chased Charles Clay out of bounds. The Jets' defense came up big both times.

AS THE CRO FLIES: CB Antonio Cromartie played nearly every defensive snap, and there were a lot of them as Miami possessed the ball for 24 minutes, 12 seconds in the first half. Cromartie also had an interception. Miami QB Ryan Tannehill threw a ball tipped up by Muhammad Wilkerson, and Cromartie essentially boxed out WR Mike Wallace to make the catch.

NO PLACE LIKE HOLMES: Jets WR Santonio Holmes was technically active for the game, but he was used sparingly -- in on just three plays. To be fair, the Jets' offense was only on the field for 5:43. Still, Holmes has not been his usual self this season, dealing with a hamstring and foot injury. With Holmes limited and WR Jeremy Kerley out, it doesn’t help Smith.

With production like this, can the Jets afford to keep Smith in for long?
Jane McManus has covered New York sports since 1998 and began covering football just before Brett Favre's stint with the Jets. Her work has appeared in Newsday, USA Today, The Journal News and The New York Times. Follow Jane on Twitter.

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