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Does Cary Williams fall under Ravens' domestic violence stance?

3/3/2015

It was a week ago when Baltimore Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome said it will be tough to bring in a player with domestic abuse in his background.

Does that mean the Ravens won't consider re-signing cornerback Cary Williams?

Williams, 30, who was released by the Philadelphia Eagles on Tuesday, was a starter for the Ravens' 2012 Super Bowl team and tied for the team lead with four interceptions. Despite his down season last year, he would upgrade the Ravens at cornerback, one of the biggest weaknesses on the team in 2014.

But it's unknown whether the Ravens' hard stance on domestic violence applies to Williams. He served a two-game suspension in 2010 as a member of the Ravens for an alleged domestic violence incident that occurred the previous year while he was with the Tennessee Titans. Even though Williams was not arrested, the NFL suspended him for a violation of the personal conduct policy.

So, do the Ravens not think about bringing back Williams because of this alleged incident? Or is Williams an exception because the Ravens have a history with him?

During his four seasons with the Ravens (2009-12), he had no off-the-field issues. Williams was so well-liked by the organization that the Ravens offered him a three-year, $15 million contract extension before the 2012 season, but he turned it down.

Williams signed a three-year, $17 million contract with the Eagles after the Ravens won the Super Bowl, and he started every game for Philadelphia the past two seasons. He struggled at times last season and ranked No. 49 among cornerbacks by Pro Football Focus after allowing five touchdown passes.

Re-signing Williams makes a lot of sense for the Ravens. They're familiar with his ability and his fiery attitude, and Williams would probably come at a modest price, which is key for a team with not much cap room. He would press Ladarius Webb for a starting job, and at the very least be a significant step up from Asa Jackson at nickelback.

Before that reunion can happen, the Ravens have to decide where Williams falls under the team's new stance on domestic violence.