Don't underestimate DeVier Posey's impact

August, 19, 2013
8/19/13
5:04
PM ET
Before DeAndre Hopkins watched Andre Johnson's every move, it was DeVier Posey who hungered for his knowledge

Posey
When he came to the Houston Texans, he asked for his locker to be next to Johnson's to better learn from one of the best.

It's been a difficult road for Posey since then, between the work he had to do to get comfortable in the offense and the Achilles tear he's worked to overcome for the past seven months. On Monday, as expected, the Texans took him off the active/physically unable to perform list, ensuring he will be available for the start of the regular season.

"I wondered what this day would be like for a long time," Posey said after practice.

It is remarkable how much better the Texans' receiving corps is right now than it was last year. Hopkins is part of that, but so is the growth of second-year Keshawn Martin and third-year Lestar Jean, who arrived as an undrafted rookie in 2011.

Dolphins safety Chris Clemons had this to say about them Saturday: "Their receivers are big and fast and physical. You really have to play hard on every play against these guys."

That was the case even without Posey. It won't take long, though, for Posey to force his way back up the depth chart at that position.

His upper body is bigger. He says his legs are even stronger than before his injury. He understands what the Texans want from him now.

Consider this observation from a recent story on Football Outsiders: "For 29 of the 32 teams, the most common offensive personnel grouping in 2012 was 11 personnel: one running back, one tight end, and three wide receivers. (The exceptions were Detroit, Houston, and San Francisco.)"

Last year the Texans just weren't very deep at receiver. This year, they'll have much better options at the position. Having Johnson, Hopkins and Posey could open the door for more looks with three receivers.

Tania Ganguli

ESPN Houston Texans reporter

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