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Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Oilers/Titans' top plays: Music City Miracle

By Paul Kuharsky

Kevin Dyson
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This is one of three nominations for the most memorable play in team history. We’ve already looked at Mike Renfro's non-catch catch in the 1979 AFC Championship Game. We will also feature Kevin Dyson's desperate, unsuccessful reach for the end zone that came up a yard short of forcing overtime as time expired on Super Bowl XXXIV. Please vote for your choice as the Oilers/Titans’ most memorable play.

Score: Titans 22, Bills 16
Date: January 8, 2000 Site: Adelphia Coliseum

As a head coach, Jeff Fisher prided himself on having his team ready for everything.

In a playoffs-or-pink-slips season, the franchise's first as the reinvented Tennessee Titans, Fisher got to offer the best possible example of that.

The Titans fell behind 16-15 with 16 seconds left in a wild-card playoff game after Steve Christie hit a 41-yard field goal.

The Titans responded with “Home Run Throwback,” a play designed by special teams coach Alan Lowry. It called for Frank Wycheck to field an expected squib kick, sell the coverage team he was returning it to the right, and then whirling and throwing a lateral to Derrick Mason.

Mason was out with a concussion, however, and his backup for the play, safety Anthony Dorsett, was also unable to play.

Kevin Dyson was quickly coached up to take on the role.

It wasn’t Wycheck, but Lorenzo Neal who fielded the kick. He handed it back to Wycheck, who sold the fake and made the throw. Dyson came back to collect the low throw, turned and sprinted into wide-open space with a convoy of blockers ahead of him. He pulled up and eased into the end zone for a 75-yard touchdown.

It withstood a replay review by referee Phil Luckett, and provided the winning margin for a team that went on to make the franchise’s lone Super Bowl appearance.

The Music City Miracle added to the lore of Buffalo sports teams coming up short, while creating an incredible story in Tennessee in just the ninth meaningful game played in the stadium built to draw the Oilers from Houston to Nashville.