AFC South: Moise Fokou

Titans Camp Report: Day 10

August, 4, 2014
Aug 4
7:17
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FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. -- A daily review of the hot topics coming out of Tennessee Titans training camp:
  • The Titans got no one injured Monday in a joint practice with the Falcons at their facility, always the best development to come out of a preseason practice. Defensive linemen Antonio Johnson and Mike Martin and tight end Dorin Dickerson came in with injuries and didn’t practice.
  • The first fight turned out to be the only big fight. It came as the Titans and Falcons worked on punt returns and Coty Sensabaugh swiped a helmet off Robert McClain and a lot of players from both teams came onto the scene to get involved. It may have settled itself down, but Tommie Campbell came flying in to shove two Falcons, Bernard Pollard got involved and Ri’Shard Anderson came in with helmet in hand and swung it into Atlanta’s Ricardo Allen “We got it over and out of the way and moved on,” coach Ken Whisenhunt said. “We thought it might come, it came early and we settled down.” Whisenhunt doesn’t fine players for practice fights, but Anderson should be fined for a foolhardy and dangerous move.
  • Later, Falcons center Joe Hawley got tossed by officials for his role in a smaller scrap with Michael Griffin.
  • Whisenhunt was audibly upset when Falcons defensive end Osi Umenyiora hit Jake Locker’s arm on a pass. “He grabbed his arm, he hit his hand,” Whisenhunt said. “Osi apologized. He knows he can’t do that.”
  • Marqueston Huff looked like he’s got the potential to be a quality gunner on punt returns. I saw him quickly burst between Kimario McFadden and Jordan Mabin to get en route in a hurry.
  • On a very early snap in one-on-ones matching Titans defensive backs against Falcons receivers, Jason McCourty was right with Roddy White on a quick throw from Matt Ryan, got an arm in and watched the ball pop loose. Another pass for White with McCourty on him was overthrown. McCourty was very solid in that period. The rest of the defensive backs were not as good. Griffin drew two flags for contact. (Khalid Wooten made a nice play and had a near pick of a Jeff Matthews pass for Tramaine Thompson. I think Wooten is steadily improving though he's not playing against the high-caliber guys.)
  • In one-on-ones, the Titans' offense connected on a big play early as Justin Hunter ran away from corner Robert McClain, collecting a throw from Charlie Whitehurst. Hunter caught another deep one from Zach Mettenberger.
  • Locker didn’t throw deep much, as the Falcons seemed to be offering open stuff underneath far more often. Some plays worked great against it. Locker hit Kendall Wright out of the slot and Wright ran away from Josh Wilson for what would have been a touchdown. On another play, Dexter McCluster worked into open space in the short middle and had a ton of space from there. Whitehurst found room for some shots. One of them connected up the right side with Derek Hagan over corner Javier Arenas and safety Sean Baker.
  • In many practices Locker still seems to have one moment that could be deadly. He held the ball and shuffled left as the pocket began to collapse and threw for Delanie Walker. But Desmond Trufant got to it and dropped what should have been a pick. “For any quarterback, there is always at least one you wish you could have back,” he said when I asked him about that specific play.
  • Both of the Titans' kickers attempted field goals against the Falcons field goal defense from 33, 36, 39, 42 and 46 yards. Travis Coons made them all, Maikon Bonani missed his attempt from 46 wide right.
  • Andy Levitre took three snaps in each team period before rookie Taylor Lewan replaced him. Levitre had his appendix removed on July 24. He still didn’t participate in the high contact one-on-one pass-rush drills.
  • In one team period, the offense worked exclusively in “penny,” its three-cornerback, one-safety package.
  • Falcons receiver Harry Douglas made a catch over Sensabaugh after the Falcons had the Titans jumping around before the snap. Derrick Morgan started with his hand down at left end, stood up and backed out, then returned to his initial position while multiple defenders shouted out multiple signals and waved each other around in what appeared to be confusion.
  • Akeem Ayers made a couple plays, including batting down a pass from Sean Renfree. In one-on-ones he made a great spin move against tackle Lamar Holmes that got him to the quarterback. But in a seven-on-seven period, T.J. Yates threw to running back Devonta Freeman and Ayers had no chance against him in space.
  • Avery Williamson impressively ran step for step with running back Josh Vaughan on a deep route and the pass glanced on the rookie linebacker’s helmet.
  • Moise Fokou worked as high in the linebacker rotation as I can remember, pairing with Zaviar Gooden as the inside tandem with the second team at least some.
  • On a snap where DaQuan Jones and Al Woods were the two defensive linemen, neither put a hand on the ground. The Titans played that one with everyone starting off standing up.
  • On one snap of nickel where nose tackle Sammie Hill came off the field, the standing up, off-the-line outside linebacker Kamerion Wimbley actually lined up inside of right end Jurrell Casey.
  • There were a bunch of penalty flags on both sides. The most popular offense was illegal contact by defensive backs. The second biggest was offside. More to come on that
  • It’s always amazing to see how many guys know each other when two rosters of 90 and their coaching staffs combine. Titans linebacker Zach Brown saw Yates and exclaimed, “T.J, what’s up buddy?” Atlanta offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter chatted with Hagan. Falcons owner Arthur Blank got off his cart to hug Titans tight ends coach Mike Mularkey, who used to be Atlanta’s offensive coordinator. A lot of it was pre-practice, a lot was during the kicking period when non-special teamers had time to chat. I watched Chris Spencer and Griffin talk with Devin Hester as Pollard shouted to the Titans, “Y'all be careful with making friends right now.”
  • Find pictures at pkuharsky on Instagram.
  • The Titans are off Tuesday, then have an open practice at 9:20 a.m. CT Wednesday.

Moise Fokou penalty baffles Titans

December, 1, 2013
12/01/13
6:07
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INDIANAPOLIS -- T.Y. Hilton's 20-yard catch was finished and the first half clock was expiring.

Moise Fokou stopped it with a shove in the back of Stanley Havili. The penalty against the Tennessee Titans linebacker gave the Indianapolis Colts 15 yards and one play with a second remaining. Adam Vinatieri promptly hit a 37-yard field goal -- one of five in the game.

A free 3 points for the Colts en route to a 22-14 win over the Titans. That kick boosted the Colts lead from 9-7 to 12-7.

The play symbolized the Titans' season. They are undisciplined at key moments and allow opponents to take control and benefit.

"We can't do that, we just cannot do that," safety Bernard Pollard said. "We are walking into the locker room, they have three field goals. That gave them some life. You just can't do that…

"I had some choice words, those were bleep bleep bleep bleep bleep. We can't make those mistakes. It's hard to win in this game. It'd hard to keep powerful teams with really good players down. It's hard to keep points off the board. I think it was a 30 yards swing. (Actually 35.) It's ridiculous."

Fokou said, "no comment" to direct questions about the penalty, which is quite an impressive way to be accountable for a big mistake.

After more questions that were more about a play like that and less specifically about his, he relented a bit.

"It's frustrating," he said. "It's never a good thing to give up easy points, you can't do that, you can't win doing that."

Coach Mike Munchak leaned heavily on not having seen it.

"Obviously you can't do something like that," he said. "I don't think a lot goes through your mind when it happens. I think it's instinct or quick reaction, I don't know. I don't know why something like that would happen, it shouldn't happen."

Instinct?

That's what the Titans need, guys with instincts that tell them to hand away 15 yards and field goal opportunities.

Fans should be starting to count how many times Munchak says "I don't know" as well as another favorite, "for whatever reason."

More to come on him and the state of his team that scares no one else in the AFC South.

Upon Further Review: Titans Week 11

November, 15, 2013
11/15/13
12:28
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A review of four hot issues from the Tennessee Titans' 30-27 loss to the Indianapolis Colts at LP Field:

Foku
Missing Fokou: When linebacker Moise Fokou hurt his knee Oct. 13 at Seattle, some of us believed the Titans might be better off with Colin McCarthy plugged in at middle linebacker. It’s not as though McCarthy’s been terrible, but three of the four games without Fokou have been run-defense disasters -- 153 yards to San Francisco, 160 to St. Louis and 137 to Indianapolis. (There was a 54-yard game against Jacksonville, too.) Getting Fokou back might not be the answer, but this was a better defense when he was running it.

Special teams: Of all the moves Mike Munchak made, firing Alan Lowry might have been the biggest. Current special teams coach Nate Kaczor isn't making the mistakes, and his units have been hard-hit by the injuries, but the Titans have been far more likely to commit a gaffe on special teams than produce a play. Every team in the league should have a guy they can call up from the practice squad who can field kicks and punts and secure the ball. Devon Wylie's kick return fumble -- which was the result of him bumping into a teammate -- was an absolute killer.

Fitzpatrick
Third and short: I’m fine with the Titans’ willingness to throw in an unconventional situation. They converted an early third-and-1 with a 12-yard pass to Delanie Walker. But the second time they faced third-and-1, when they were running the ball well, Ryan Fitzpatrick threw incomplete for Kendall Wright to stall a drive after just three plays. Shouldn't a team trying to create a we-can-run-when-we-want MO at least allow for the possibility of running it by not going with the empty backfield? They went empty on a third-and-2 a bit later, and converted thanks to a roughing call against Robert Mathis.

Covering Coby Fleener: The tight end wound up with eight catches for 107 yards and was a key to the Colts’ win. The Titans have been far better against tight ends this season than the past couple years, mostly because safety George Wilson's been part of the dime and three-safety nickel packages. Wilson played one snap on defense, and the Titans defended Fleener with base and regular nickel personnel. The three top cornerbacks, free safety Michael Griffin and strongside linebacker Akeem Ayers were all involved in tackling him.
Akeem AyersAP Photo/Tom GannamAkeem Ayers Ayers had three tackles and a pass defensed in the Titans' win against the Rams.
ST. LOUIS -- For six games, middle linebacker Moise Fokou ran the Tennessee Titans' defense, wearing the coach-to-player speaker in his green-dotted helmet.

After Fokou hurt a knee in Seattle on Oct. 13, his replacement, Colin McCarthy, did the job against San Francisco.

But the Titans came out of the bye with a new player charged with the job.

Strongside linebacker Akeem Ayers called the plays and didn’t leave the field, playing as the middle linebacker in nickel during Tennessee’s 28-21 win against the Rams.

"Coach (Jerry) Gray and coach (Gregg) Williams wanted to try something different," Ayers said. "Last year we had a lot of success in our nickel package when we had me and Zach Brown as the two nickel linebackers late in the season. They just thought it would be good for us after doing a lot of self-scouting in the bye week to come out and do something different."

He played every snap at strongside linebacker in base and at "Mike" in nickel, the most he’s played all season.

I don’t know that his increased presence and role had any great bearing on the team, but it did mark a notable change.

Ayers finished with three tackles and a pass defensed. McCarthy, even playing less, led the team with nine tackles on a day when the Titans played poor run defense, allowing rookie running back Zac Stacy 127 yards on 27 carries, and the Rams 5.0 yards per rush attempt.

Turning to Ayers as the defensive play-caller and with a full-time role might have been just a one-game thing. The Rams are run-first team, and Ayers is better as a run-defender than in coverage.

With Greg Williams added to the defensive staff and the Titans still unsure of how to deploy their second-round pick from 2011, they set out this season to use Ayers as a base linebacker and a nickel defensive end, but he’s not stood out much in either role.

It still needs sorting out, and once Fokou is healthy I expect he’ll be back in the middle as the every-down linebacker and play-caller.

In the meantime, it might have given Ayers a bit of a confidence boost that the team factored him into this plan in a bigger way.

"It was a different position for Akeem to be in," safety George Wilson said. "He did an outstanding job getting us the calls, getting us lined up. Anytime you have a guy who hasn’t played it, you’re going to have a few plays where you get some calls mixed up or we don’t get a call. But that didn’t happen much at all. We were able to get lined up and keep the ball in front of us. That was the goal."

It wasn’t a good defensive day, overall. The Titans did have some good moments, however. St. Louis got the ball twice on turnovers, and Tennessee put on the brakes after the sudden changes, allowing the Rams to convert them into zero points.

And after Jake Locker's second interception looked like it would position the Rams for a clock-milking, game-winning drive, the Titans' defense got the ball back.

Jurrell Casey stripped Kellen Clemens at the Rams’ 17-yard line, Derrick Morgan recovered it at the 19, and Chris Johnson took the next play into the end zone for a 28-21 lead that held up as the final score.

"In sudden-change situations, we won on both sides of the ball," Casey said.

The Titans' defense has been reliable and consistent. But they’ve now allowed touchdowns the past six times opponents have crossed their 20 yard line, they’ve allowed more than 150 rushing yards three games in a row, and they’ve given up a 45 percent third-down conversion rate the past two weeks when it was 27 percent before that.

"For some reason, the last two games that we played, we’ve been slipping," Casey said. "So we’ve got to get back to what we were doing the first couple weeks and turn the game back around."

Double Coverage: Titans at Rams

October, 31, 2013
10/31/13
12:00
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Alterraun Verner and Chris LongUSA TODAY SportsTitans CB Alterraun Verner and Rams DE Chris Long are two of the league's best at their positions.
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Any time the St. Louis Rams and Tennessee Titans meet, memories of Super Bowl XXXIV are sure to come to the fore. In one of the greatest Super Bowl finishes of all time, the Rams emerged with their lone championship during their time in St. Louis.

A lot has changed since, but neither team has managed to get back to the promised land and it seems like a long shot either will this season. This week, the Rams and Titans renew acquaintances at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis. ESPN.com Rams reporter Nick Wagoner and Titans reporter Paul Kuharsky discuss some things worth watching, including an interesting role reversal for one of the key figures in that Super Bowl.

Wagoner: Well, it's pretty obvious what the big story is going to be this week. Jeff Fisher is facing his former team for the first time since taking over as the coach in St. Louis. As is to be expected, Fisher is downplaying that whole angle, but you were around him a lot in his years in Nashville. Do you expect Fisher to have a little something extra for his old team this week?

Kuharsky: It would be so much better if it were in Nashville. Then we’d have the crowd reaction as a part of it, too. Still, it’s intriguing. He will definitely have something (or some things) drawn up that he feels will uniquely exploit the schemes and styles of his former underlings Mike Munchak, Jerry Gray and Gregg Williams. If those things work, I’d expect Fisher will then talk about how one of his assistants who was once in Tennessee -- Chuck Cecil, Dave McGinnis or even Ray Sherman -- was instrumental in the design. Fisher didn’t leave with hard feelings, and I believe he wishes the organization well. Still, any proud former employee in this sort of circumstance wants to outperform the former employer. He’s talked about it meaning more for the guys on the roster who were once Titans.

Jared Cook had a monster opening day but has been quiet since. Cortland Finnegan missed some time hurt. What’s the status of those guys?

Wagoner: Cook has really struggled dealing with teams giving him more attention and, more specifically, being physical with him at the line of scrimmage and downfield. He stopped on a route last week against Seattle, and it resulted in an interception. The Rams have gone back to more of a power running scheme that has also limited his snaps because he doesn’t bring much to the table as a blocker. Finnegan won’t say it, but I believe he was banged up at the beginning of the season; his first four games were downright brutal. He returned last week against Seattle, and for now he’s working exclusively in the nickel as the team’s third corner rather than just bumping inside in those situations. Given that he’s only a little more than a year into a monster contract, it’s hard to categorize him as anything but a disappointment for the price.

A lot will be made of the Fisher-Tennessee connection, but I’m more intrigued by the Gregg Williams situation. The way things went down with him and the Rams, and between Williams’ son Blake and the Rams, had to have created some tension on all sides. What has Williams’ impact been down there in Tennessee, and what exactly is his role?

Kuharsky: By title, he’s senior assistant/defense. In practice, he’s not-quite defensive coordinator. Gray is still calling the plays, but Williams’ influence is undeniable. This defense had no personality or attitude last season. Now it’s the backbone of the team. It mixes it up and disguises its looks up front, it blitzes more often and it plays far more man-to-man. Bernard Pollard has been a great fit who has talked with swagger and backed it up. Some guys most people have never heard of -- defensive end Ropati Pitoitua and middle linebacker Moise Fokou -- have been very good additions. Williams certainly had a say in bringing those guys in. He has stayed in the background and seems comfortable there. I would imagine he and Gray are excited to put together a plan to make Kellen Clemens uncomfortable.

How do you think Clemens will respond in his second start since Sam Bradford went down?

Wagoner: To paraphrase one of the great philosophers of our time, Mr. Dennis Green, Clemens proved last week against Seattle that he is what we thought he was. He’s a tough, gritty, consummate professional who can occasionally extend plays with his legs and make something happen. He’s also consistently inaccurate, a bit indecisive and has a knack for costly turnovers (though his two interceptions Monday night weren’t completely his fault). Another week to work with the starters should help, but he was a bit sore after Monday night’s game against Seattle. The Rams don’t need him to throw for 300 yards and five touchdowns, but they do need him to convert in the red zone and not turn the ball over.

There are something like 16 players from the Fisher era remaining in Tennessee, one of whom is running back Chris Johnson. The Rams have been better defending the run the past two weeks, but they need to prove they can keep doing it. It appears Johnson has struggled after the team made efforts to help him in the offseason. What’s going on with Johnson, and is he (and the Titans' offensive line) capable of taking advantage of the Rams’ run defense?

Kuharsky: The Titans are built on a philosophy of throwing it when they want to, not when they have to. That’s a mistake because the revamped line and Johnson are not equipped to run it they way they think they can. Jets fans get a kick out of this, but to a large degree the Titans' hope things will get better comes from Shonn Greene. The bigger back was brought in as a compliment to CJ, but he got hurt in the opener and made it back only the week before the bye; he has hardly played. They need him to emerge and contribute. Based on current numbers, the Rams are the third-softest run defense the Titans will have seen this season. If they can’t run Sunday, it will really speak to their issues.

Chris Long and Robert Quinn looked really good against Seattle. Have they been giving everyone problems like that?

Wagoner: Quinn certainly has. Through the first half of the season, he’s really starting to realize his immense potential. I believe he’s the Rams’ best player right now, and have felt that way since the beginning of the season. He’s an athletic freak who gives slower tackles problems. He feasts on inferior players, but he can get it done against good tackles as well. Long was banged up earlier in the season but has battled through it and is starting to find his stride. Given the situation on offense right now, the Rams need this duo to take over games on a regular basis and set the tone for a defense that, before last week, had largely disappointed this season.

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Zach Brown's big chance slipped away

October, 13, 2013
10/13/13
10:36
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videoSEATTLE -- The ball was in Zach Brown's hands, with an open field ahead of him.

He looked at all the green, and the ball slid up and off of those hands and right back to Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson. Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch, who was stripped of the ball by Moise Fokou, was off the hook.

Instead of a 91-yard fumble recovery and a 17-10 Titans lead, Tennessee watched the Seahawks gather themselves and kick a field goal for a 13-10 advantage en route to a 20-13 decision.

“I looked up,” Brown said with a grimace. “I was thinking about scoring before I scooped the ball. It could have been a big difference in the game.

"Touchdown for sure. I mean, I’m not letting Russell Wilson tackle me, I wouldn’t hear the end of it from my teammates. I probably would have slowed down, because I had two guys right behind me. I would have just let them block. I think big [Antonio] Mook Johnson was going for the quarterback right then.”

It’s the sort of play the Titans can’t afford to let slip away and the sort of play that will leave them sleepless.

“We’re putting ourselves in situations where you have to be perfect,” coach Mike Munchak said, “and you can’t make one mistake.”

It’s hard to put much blame on the Titans defense, though that one mistake amounted to a 10-point swing.

They held Seattle to 20 points and key defenders on special teams produced Tennessee’s lone touchdown, a 77-yard fumble return by Jason McCourty after he and Michael Griffin forced a fumble by substitute holder Chris Maragos.

“The defense was phenomenal, they did a great job.” offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains said. “They played well enough to win.”

Locker Room Buzz: Tennessee Titans

October, 13, 2013
10/13/13
9:42
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SEATTLE -- Observed and heard in the locker room after the Tennessee Titans' 20-13 loss to the Seattle Seahawks at CenturyLink Field:

Average: As much as Mike Munchak and his team are struggling, at least the Titans coach isn’t hiding from the obvious. “We’re 3-3,” he said. “That means we’re average right now.” Players largely agreed and receiver Nate Washington said he thinks next week’s home game qualifies as a must-win for the Titans. A win over the San Francisco 49ers would send the Titans to their bye at 4-3, a loss would mean 3-4.

Fokou
Tests Monday: Moise Fokou, the team’s steady middle linebacker, left the game early in the fourth quarter with a sprained knee. He still finished tied for the second-most tackles, with eight. He was replaced by Colin McCarthy. Fokou said he would have tests Monday morning in Nashville to determine the extent of the injury. Running back Jackie Battle also didn’t finish the game with a neck problems that came about on special teams.

Killer penalty: The Titans’ last shot to get the ball back ended with a third-down offside call against rookie defensive end Lavar Edwards. “Stupid mistake, a mistake that I shouldn’t have made,” he said. “Anything could have happened if I wouldn’t have jumped offsides. It was a bad play that could have cost us the game.”

Check pkuharsky at Instgram for a few postgame pictures.
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Seven players have worked as the Titans' primary starting middle linebacker since the team moved to Tennessee in 1997.

Only Randall Godfrey rated as an every-down player by design.

[+] EnlargeDanny Woodhead, Moise Fokou
Jim Brown/USA TODAY SportsThe Titans are a top-10 defense with Moise Fokou (53) as an every-down linebacker.
Other middle linebackers got a chance to play as part of the nickel package, but Stephen Tulloch and Colin McCarthy were there mostly because the other two linebackers weren't good enough or experienced enough.

The 2013 Titans are not only using middle linebacker Moise Fokou as a back in nickel, he's the only linebacker on the field in dime -- a package they've played a great deal.

Fokou's been mostly solid for the Titans. But he's not the dynamic linebacker Zach Brown is, so I have been a bit surprised.

I'm a big proponent of the best players being on the field the most, but I'm also a big proponent of being a top-10 defense, and the Titans are ninth through five games with Fokou as an every-down player.

"We have found no reason to take Moses off the field," linebackers coach Chet Parlavecchio said. "It's been always a traditional [football] thing, the 'Mike' linebacker runs the show. We have a situation here where our Mike is very comfortable. It's not just about him, it's about getting everybody else lined up. It's not just about his production, it's about allowing 10 other guys to produce. Because they are used to Moise -- the way he communicates defense adjustments, the way he recognizes formation -- there is no reason to take that off the field.

"Ten other guys are depending on him identifying the things necessary for us to get lined up. There is just no reason to do it. It's not just Moise versus Zach. Since Moise has run this thing since Day 1, he's the most comfortable. He understands what everybody needs to hear and I think the results speak for themselves."

It's understandable reasoning, for sure.

The Titans are playing excellent third-down defense, allowing conversions just 28.1 percent of the time.

But according to John Parolin of ESPN Stats & Info, Tennessee's opponents are converting 31.6 percent on third-and-6 or more and 23.1 percent on third-and-5 or less.

That's backwards. Third-and-long should be tougher to convert than third-and-short. Perhaps part of the reason for that is their dime linebacker isn't their best linebacker against the pass.

It's not the time for a change. But I do allow for the possibility that things could be even better with Brown, who is a better pass defender than Fokou and should also be adept at lining people up as well.

"It's frustrating, it's frustrating for anybody to go to the sideline," Brown said. "But you've just got to do what you've got to do and sacrifice for the team and the greater good to win the game. You might not like it, but you can't do nothing about it.

"I know what to do, if they asked me to do it, I could do it. But I haven't been called upon yet. So I'm just playing my role."

Fokou has played 97.6 percent of the Titans' defensive plays -- all but eight. Brown has played 75 percent. Strongside linebacker Akeem Ayers, who also plays as a rush end, has played just 58.7 percent.

Brown came on strong late in his rookie year and has made the second-year leap coaches always hope for from good players.

"It's a big leap, I know where to be, I know where to go," he said. "I'm not scared to take chances now. Sometimes you've got to gamble to win, if you don't take chances you're just playing the book and you can't be a robot out there.

Fokou said as he joined the Titans and won the middle linebacker in the preseason, when McCarthy was hurt most of the time, that he was anticipating this workload.

"I'm a football player, I want to be on the field every down, whenever," he said. "I worked hard for it and I saw a light at the end of the tunnel and, yeah, I expected it, you know?"

Survey says: The Titans' bad habits

September, 26, 2013
9/26/13
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NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Coaches want to instill habits.

In many ways, that’s what coaching is. Most coaches don’t want players thinking too much during a play, they want them reacting to things according to a plan, using techniques that have become habit.

But most things involving habits also include bad habits.

I asked Tennessee Titans middle linebacker Moise Fokou what bad habit he’s had to overcome in his football life, and how overcoming it and retraining himself has paid off.

“Even in college I was guilty of moving too fast,” the fifth-year pro said. “A lot of times you want to react fast and diagnose the play quickly, and get to it before the play gets there, almost. I’ve always been one of those guys who’s pretty quick. And when I diagnose, I kind of get to the play before.

“Sometimes that habit will get me in trouble, because what I thought I saw wasn’t exactly what was happening. I’ve learned to use my quickness as an asset, but also kind of to play it slower. Diagnose a play, then react as quickly as possible -- instead of reacting as soon as you see it. You still get there, but make sure it is what you are seeing.”

[+] EnlargeMoise Fokou
AP Photo/Joe RobbinsTitans linebacker Moise Fokou said learning to slow himself down has paid huge dividends.
Fokou is in the middle for the Titans, but came to Nashville with NFL experience at the Will and Sam linebacker spots. According to Fokou, at those positions, seeing what's happening and getting there immediately is more pressing.

“At the Mike, you kind of have to be the top-off, make sure everything is safe,” he said. “So I’m doing more reading and reacting than reacting and reading right now.”

I toured the Titans locker room to talk bad habits with many others, trying to get an answer from someone at every position. I like doing surveys like this because I always get unexpected answers. I figured most answers would relate to technique, but many didn’t.

Here's what I learned:

Jurrell Casey, defensive tackle: “I would say finishing. A lot of times you get into a situation where you get beat, pinned at the line of scrimmage or whatnot and you think there is no way out of it. You’ll kind of just sit there and let the quarterback move around. On your first move, you have to learn how to convert into that second move. Now my biggest thing is converting into that second move and not letting a guy win after the first move.”

Craig Stevens, tight end: “Not getting off on the snap count. It's an advantage that offensive players have. I try to focus on that. Sometime I didn’t pay attention to it like I should. You’ve got to focus on it. It helps a lot. You can get off before [defensive players] can.”

Jason McCourty, cornerback: “I don’t know what to say, I don’t want to put anything out there and people go, ‘That’s his habit, let’s attack him doing that.’ [Then 30 seconds about how reps at press coverage have helped the secondary play it better, followed by me asking if he was going to give me a habit.] I’m not going to give you a habit, I’m going to talk around the question.”

Shonn Greene, running back: “Maybe in pass pro(tection). Grabbing a guy outside his shoulder pads instead of keeping my hands in. If you do it, it’s a lot easier to get called for a hold, and it’s not the right technique to use. You’ve got to keep them inside. … That’s a habit I’ve had that I’ve been trying to correct. I’m better at it now, but it’s just one of those things that sometimes it slips.”

Derrick Morgan, defensive end: “Not sticking to my rush plan. Sometimes I would kind of abandon it and start trying new stuff. Now I don’t get discouraged, I just stay with the plan. You can’t get discouraged if something doesn’t work the first time. Stay with it, with what I’ve been practicing.”

Nate Washington, wide receiver: “Making a move before I get the ball, taking my eye off the ball, not looking it all the way in. Especially now with coach (Shawn) Jefferson here, that’s his main thing -- eyes, eyes, eyes. Making sure you’re looking the ball all the way in. A lot of times, if you look at a receiver if he drops the ball, nine times out of 10 it’s going to be because he turned his head too fast, looking to make a move without the ball.”

Rob Turner, center: “I think as an offensive lineman, you’re always working on your hands. You get caught in positions, defensive linemen move, they are running a game, they are working to get off a block, arm-over. And it’s something you constantly fight, to improve your hand placement. You may have them in a good spot to begin with, and a guy makes a move and you have to replace it or pull it out. That’s something I’ve constantly worked at, is getting better with my hands. You get away with stuff in college -- not to speak bad of every college player, but not every college player is an elite player. So I think you get away with more stuff because a guy isn’t as strong or doesn’t take great footwork. There is more room for mistakes at that level. Once you make a move to the next level, every one of those attention-to-detail things becomes more important.”

Darius Reynaud, return man: “For me, it would be on punt returns. Judging the ball and judging those guys, for me as a punt returner, I tend to stop to see where everyone is at before I go. That’s my bad habit. Against Pittsburgh, when I caught it, I just hit it and ran and got a 27-yard average on it. I need to catch the ball and go forward with it.”

Coty Sensabaugh, nickelback: “Eyes looking at the wrong thing. Say you’re in man-to-man coverage, you’re guarding the receiver really well. Then instead of looking at him when he breaks, you’re looking at the quarterback. He can separate from you. I’ve gotten a whole lot better at it. I had a bad habit of it in college. My college coach used to correct me on that and really get on me about that, so I got out of the habit pretty well.”
Matt Schaub and Jake LockerGetty Images, AP PhotoQuarterbacks Matt Schaub and Jake Locker look to lead their respective teams to a 2-0 start.
Titans owner Bud Adams is vilified in Houston because he took the Oilers out of town. The aging, eccentric Adams still lives in Houston, and he’s expected to attend Sunday's Titans-Texans game.

The Texans are coming off a wonderful 31-28 comeback win in San Diego. The Titans took care of the Steelers in Pittsburgh.

Inevitably, an opening-day win gives a team some reassurance about its plan and course. The Titans' buy-in is certainly high.

Had the Texans lost to the Chargers, I imagine this week's themes would revolve around the carryover of issues that killed them late last season.

The comeback from a 28-7 deficit changed that. They’re the two time-defending division champions. Even so, Tania Ganguli, how much of a boost did that comeback give them?

Tania Ganguli: It gave them a big one. Coming back from big deficits was something they struggled with last year. That led to the Texans being labeled as a team that wasn't built to come from behind because their running game is such a big part of their offense. They showed an ability to pass their way out of a big hole. Quarterback Matt Schaub was excellent in the third quarter, spearheading the recovery. Defensively, they showed the ability to adjust. After the Chargers' third-quarter-opening touchdown, San Diego had 10 yards of total offense the rest of the half. Incredible.

How has Gregg Williams changed the Titans' defense?

Paul Kuharsky: He’s not the coordinator, and Jerry Gray continues to call the plays. But Tennessee really mixed up its fronts against the Steelers. They didn’t blitz an immense amount but they were more unpredictable and more aggressive than they had been last year.

I certainly felt like we were seeing Williams’ influence in those areas. Williams has certainly had a positive bearing on their aggressive approach to the game and on the team’s attitude. If guys like tackle Jurrell Casey and linebacker Zach Brown play like they did in the opener, they’ve developed some playmakers. If guys like end Ropati Pitoitua and linebacker Moise Fokou keep up their play from the opener, they’ve added some quality new pieces.

What’s Wade Phillips doing with his new pieces, and will we see all of them?

Ganguli: Ed Reed is getting healthier, but we won't know his status until Friday afternoon. He will have a lot of free rein to dictate what he does, just like he did in Baltimore. He's helped other players and helped his coaches by offering suggestions on things he's seen. I asked Phillips if he is more inclined to listen to Reed than other players and Phillips said Reed's suggestions are better than most players.

When the Texans drafted safety D.J. Swearinger, they knew they were in dime so often that even as the third safety he'd see the field a lot. Swearinger was on the field for 55 percent of the Texans' defensive snaps Monday in San Diego.

Joe Mays was solid starting at inside linebacker on Sunday. Given Darryl Sharpton's injury history, he's a very important piece the Texans added during training camp.

We could include Whitney Mercilus and Earl Mitchell as somewhat new pieces -- full-time starters at outside linebacker and nose tackle. Both had big nights in San Diego. Mercilus hit Philip Rivers on the pass that Brian Cushing intercepted. Mercilus also had an early sack, giving Phillips the outside pass rush he needs. Mitchell's most important play came when he chased down running back Ryan Mathews as he ran with a pass. Mitchell stopped Mathews two yards short of a first down. Rivers' next pass fell incomplete, and that was the last time the Chargers had the ball.

You mentioned Casey earlier. He's been fairly talkative lately, and apparently has played well, too. Will he cause problems for the Texans?

Kuharsky: If the Titans have a chance at a second consecutive upset, Casey will have to be disruptive. The 2011 third-round pick out of USC had a very solid rookie season, but last season he hurt an elbow in the preseason and had a couple of other injuries slow down his growth. He’s healthy now and could be on course to be a Geno Atkins type of player. I know some Texans fans bristled that he dared talk confidently. But I’m guessing those same fans were OK with someone like Antonio Smith talking before he’d done much, either.

If Casey draws double-teams from the Texans' offensive line, then others need to apply pressure. End Derrick Morgan and strongside linebacker/nickel end Akeem Ayers are the top candidates there, though Brown is the one who charged out the strongest last week.

The Titans usually think if they can rattle Schaub they’ll be in good shape, but last week Schaub was rattled in the first half and bounced back quite well against the Chargers. Do you expect him to be the first-half guy, the second-half guy, or something in between?

Ganguli: The defense he'll play is a little bit better this week, and their aggressiveness will present a challenge for Schaub. His QBR was much better against four or fewer pass-rushers than it was against five or more, though he did throw all three touchdowns against extra pressure. On the other hand, I think Schaub will be more comfortable with receivers like DeAndre Hopkins, who caught five passes in his NFL debut. I expect something in between first- and second-half Schaub. Schaub has more career touchdown passes against the Titans (17) than he does against any other opponent, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

Worth noting, though: I don't think he’ll be put in the same position he was in last week. The Titans don't have the offensive firepower to bury another team early, do they?

Kuharsky: I wouldn’t think so. The offensive line is way better and they should find some runs. But the passing offense is unproven. They have a group of quality receivers and a nice new tight end in Delanie Walker. The next step would be for them to show they can make consistent plays in the passing game with some big-chunk plays.

A lot of that comes down to what Jake Locker can do. The third-year quarterback has made steady improvements recently. But one of their objectives is to shape a game where too much doesn’t land on his shoulders. They want to throw it when they want to, not when they have to. I expect the Texans will make them have to.

Also, the last time Locker played at Reliant, he failed to make an adjustment at the line and got crushed by a blitzing Glover Quin. The resulting shoulder injury cost him time and slowed his progress. He’ll need to do better on the fly.

Pressure’s on him. Pressure’s on you. First home game with ESPN.com since taking over the Texans. What happened to the guy who used to monitor that team for us?

Ganguli: I heard he got run off due to his refusal to pronounce the H in Houston.
A look at the snap report from the NFL for the Titans in their win over Pittsburgh.

Offense, 67 total snaps
LT Michael Roos, 67
LG Andy Levitre, 67
C Rob Turner, 67
RG Chance Warmack, 67
RT David Stewart, 67
QB Jake Locker, 67

TE Delanie Walker, 51
TE Craig Stevens, 49
RB Chris Johnson, 43
WR Kenny Britt, 43
WR Nate Washington, 38
WR Damian Williams, 27
TE Taylor Thompson, 25
RB Jackie Battle, 19
WR Kendall Wright, 19
FB Collin Mooney, 17
RB Shonn Greene, 4

Greene got hurt early or would likely have had most of Battle’s snaps. The team said Wright’s preseason knee injury wasn’t going to be an issue, but he should get more than that if he’s fine -- especially when Britt is ineffective.

Defense, 53 total snaps
CB Jason McCourty, 53
LB Moise Fokou, 53
LB Zach Brown, 53
FS Michael Griffin, 53

CB Alterraun Verner, 52
SS Bernard Pollard. 51
DE Derrick Morgan, 49
DT Jurrell Casey, 45
CB Coty Sensabaugh, 36
LB-DE Akeem Ayers, 29
DE Kamerion Wimbley, 27
DL Karl Klug, 23
DE Ropati Pitoitua, 19
DT Mike Martin, 17
DT Sammie Hill, 17
S George Wilson, 3
DT Antonio Johnson, 3

The Titans are supposed to be reducing Morgan’s snaps, but Ayers is coming off an ankle injury and they were clearly measuring his work. He wasn’t very effective. Pitoitua showed well. Hill was a big free-agent addition. He had an elbow injury in the preseason and I would expect more action from him.

Four Titans played 18 special-teams snaps: Patrick Bailey, Tommie Campbell, Blidi Wreh-Wilson and Daimion Stafford.

Backup quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick was the only active player who didn't take the field.

My 53-man Tennessee Titans roster

August, 30, 2013
8/30/13
3:14
PM ET
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Rather than tell you this is what’s going to happen, I’ll tell you this is what would happen if I had influence in the Tennessee Titans meeting room when final cuts will be decided.

Some cuts are already trickling out from Jim Wyatt of The Tennessean, so check his Twitter feed.

Quarterbacks: Jake Locker, Ryan Fitzpatrick

There just is no room for Rusty Smith and there isn’t a need for a third quarterback unless things go incredibly wrong. The difference between a random third guy and Smith isn’t giant.

Running backs: Chris Johnson, Shonn Greene, Jackie Battle, Quinn Johnson (FB)

Battle has to contribute on special teams, but he was better than Jalen Parmele through the preseason. Wyatt says Parmele is already gone. Johnson’s been hurt and could lose out to Collin Mooney.

Wide receivers: Kenny Britt, Nate Washington, Kendall Wright, Damian Williams, Justin Hunter, Michael Preston, Marc Mariani (return specialist)

Preston is one of the best 53 players on the team. Even though he won’t be active on Sundays if everyone’s healthy, you keep extra quality depth at one spot if it’s better than weaker depth at another spot. Once he’s healthy, Mariani isn’t as explosive as a punt returner as Darius Reynaud, but will more regularly get 10 yards.

Tight ends: Delanie Walker, Craig Stevens, Taylor Thompson

No need for a fourth on the 53. Sign Jack Doyle to the practice squad

Offensive linemen: Tackles Michael Roos, David Stewart, Mike Otto, Byron Stingily. Interior: Andy Levitre, Chance Warmack, Rob Turner, Brian Schwenke, Fernando Velasco

Velasco is guaranteed $2.02 million under his tender contract out of restricted free agency. I’m not sure he should stick over Scott Solomon at linebacker or Stefan Charles at defensive tackle. But the big push for revamping the line and the desire for depth after last year’s slew of injuries makes me feel like they will stay loaded.

Defensive ends: Derrick Morgan, Ropati Pitoitua, Kamerion Wimbley, Lavar Edwards, Keyunta Dawson.

Dawson is a good guy to have. I can see him staying and the Titans going five ends as opposed to six tackles. But linebacker Akeem Ayers is a nickel end so he factors in here as well.

Defensive tackles: Jurrell Casey, Sammie Hill, Mike Martin, Antonio Johnson, Karl Klug (swing)

I’ve got Stefan Charles over DaJohn Harris but neither making it. If one of them sticks, it’s the last defensive line spot probably over Dawson. I see Charles on the practice squad.

Linebackers: Akeem Ayers, Moise Fokou, Zach Brown, Zaviar Gooden, Colin McCarthy, Patrick Bailey

Scott Solomon is one of my last two cuts. I want to keep seven 'backers. The seventh guy would be a trade-off for Velasco, I think. Solomon is versatile, seems to be catching on to the position change and can still play end if needed. He’s not practice squad eligible. I just can’t fit him here. I might keep him over Bailey but I don’t think they rank him that way.

Safeties: Michael Griffin, Bernard Pollard, George Wilson, Daimion Stafford

The fourth spot isn’t strong and Stafford could probably go to the practice squad. But if they choose a veteran -- Al Afalava or Corey Lynch -- as the fourth I could see them trying to upgrade it with an outsider.

Cornerbacks: Jason McCourty, Alterraun Verner, Tommie Campbell, Coty Sensabaugh, Blidi Wreh-Wilson

I’d expect Khalid Wooten on the practice squad.

Kicker: Rob Bironas

Punter: Brett Kern

Long-snapper: Beau Brinkley
Reading the coverage of the Tennessee Titans ...

First-down success in the preseason has set the Titans up for far easier down-and-distance work, says John Glennon of The Tennessean. Against Atlanta, “the first team averaged more than 9 yards per play on 20 first-down attempts.”

To which I say: Nine yards per first-down play is ridiculous. The first drive on the second quarter had a huge bearing on those numbers, when the Titans hit passes of 18 and 6 yards before getting a 19-yard run from Chris Johnson.

Often-injured middle linebacker Colin McCarthy is looking at Thursday night’s game in Minnesota as an audition, as he looks to re-establish himself, says Jim Wyatt of The Tennessean.

To which I say: McCarthy’s not getting cut. His durability is a frustration and may cap his ceiling. But there is no other contender for backup middle linebacker behind Moise Fokou.

Kerry Collins is replacing Keith Bulluck for the broadcast of the final Titans preseason game, says Wyatt.

The options for injured returner/receiver Marc Mariani, from Glennon.

“The Titans played base 4-3, 4-2-5 nickel with a cornerback, 4-2-5 nickel with a safety, and what looked like 4-1-6 dime with three safeties and three corners. This was more personnel diversity than I noticed the previous two games,” says Tom Gower of Total Titans in a review of the defense against Atlanta.

Observation deck: Titans-Falcons

August, 25, 2013
8/25/13
12:58
AM ET

 
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- If you’re going to post two duds and a stellar game in the preseason, it’s best if the stellar game comes in Week 3, the traditional dress-rehearsal week.

That’s what the Tennessee Titans got Saturday night at LP Field in a 27-16 victory over the Atlanta Falcons.

The defense gave up too much on the Falcons’ first three drives but held strong in the red zone and surrendered a total of six points. The run defense still has room to improve, allowing 4.5 yards per carry to Steven Jackson in the first half.

But things got better overall as the game went on, with five sacks of Matt Ryan and much better shedding of blocks, hitting and tackling.

The headline, however, was provided by young quarterback Jake Locker.

He finished up the first half plus one series with a very solid line: 11-for-13 for 133 yards and a touchdown with a 134.9 passer rating. He was sacked three times and lost a fumble. He threw the ball well and had people catching the ball better for him but for a drive-killing Taylor Thompson drop of a pass thrown a touch behind the tight end.

The mandatory preseason disclaimer: It was a meaningless game against a team that went deep into the playoffs last season but was only 24th in overall defense and 23rd against the pass. Now, two of the Falcons’ top three cornerbacks are rookies -- Desmond Trufant and Robert Alford.

Locker’s bad moments came on the move or under pressure.

On a third-and-7 from the Titans' 35, he didn’t seem quite aware enough and should have been sacked but shrugged out of a blitz. He rolled right and turned to run for a pretty easy first down. But linebacker Joplo Bartu hit him -- and the ball -- as he went down and jarred it loose; safety Thomas DeCoud recovered it.

Beside the fumble, Locker was helpless on two sacks -- one that came from super-quick pressure past right tackle David Stewart, one on which he was pinned in on both sides and taken down as the middle closed in.

In the third quarter, the first-team offense’s lone drive stalled when Locker saw pressure and put his head down rather than feeling the pressure and trying to do something against it.

The positive far outweighed the fumble and the sacks, however.

“This is the first week that we’ve actually put in a game plan. We’d been running base stuff the first two weeks,” offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains said. “So I think that probably helped a little bit. It helped open up the play-action a little bit and helped Jake.

“I was probably too conservative early on, and once I let him go, he played really well.”

It was a very encouraging night for the quarterback. If the Titans could freeze him right here and put him in practice on Wednesday, Sept. 4, in preparation for the season opener at Pittsburgh, I think they might.

I’ve done some reporting and I’ve learned, exclusively, that such freezing is not an available option.

[+] EnlargeJake Locker
AP Photo/John RussellTitans QB Jake Locker ran three times for 22 yards in addition to his 133 yards through the air.
Some other thoughts:

Run defense still an issue: Jackson took 10 first-half carries 45 yards.

Defensive tackle Jurrell Casey, who’s healthy and playing very well, didn’t like learning those numbers.

“We want to hold guys to 2 yards a carry. One or 2 yards a carry,” Casey said. “We don’t want to give up nothing more than that because then it makes it too hard, a game where they can just pound it down your throat. In order to get to the quarterback, you’ve got to stop them on the run on first and second downs.”

See more about the run defense in this video.

Even having allowed more rushing yards than they’d like, the Titans' pass rush was excellent, with five sacks of Ryan and six overall. Casey had 1½; Derrick Morgan, Mike Martin and Kadarron Anderson had one each. Moise Fokou, Karl Klug and Kamerion Wimbley each had half a sack. Nice distribution.

Double barrel: Chris Johnson looked solid in gaining 65 yards on 11 carries with a nice 20-yard sprint to the right sideline on the Titans' first touchdown drive.

Earlier, on the Titans' second possession, Johnson got the ball on first and second down, gaining 7 yards and then 2. Tennessee sent Shonn Greene on to replace Johnson, and Greene did just what the Titans brought him in to do: find 3 yards to convert the third-and-1.

I asked Johnson if he envisioned that being the way things are going to work.

“I don’t know,” he said.

Another not-smart hit by Bernard Pollard: In the Titans’ first preseason game, Pollard put his head down and hit a Redskin heading out of bounds. That got him a $10,000 fine. In the Titans' second preseason game, he twice got beat on third-and-long, failing to make tackles in situations when he should have. Against Atlanta, on the Falcons' very first drive, he unnecessarily jumped in late on a tackle of Julio Jones and drew another personal foul penalty.

Ankle sprains: The Titans announced that both receiver Nate Washington and running back Greene didn’t finish with the first team because of ankle sprains. Washington said his was actually a right foot injury that wouldn’t cost him time unless the Titans were super cautious; Greene said his was really existing ankle soreness and not serious.

Good red zone defense after allowing the Falcons to get there too easily: The Falcons marched into the red zone on their first three drives but wound up with three field goal attempts and only six points.

“They got down there way too easy,” Casey said. “We let them get explosive plays -- big passes, things like that. We can’t allow that. When they got down there, we did our job by not letting them get in the end zone. That was one of our goals this week -- stopping them in the red zone, and we did that.”

Making a case: Receiver Michael Preston is not going to outrank any of the five receivers ahead of him, but he could be making himself a guy the Titans have to keep as a sixth, and I am hard-pressed to believe he is not one of the team’s 53 best football players.

Preston had three catches for 68 yards from Ryan Fitzpatrick, with a 56-yard bomb setting up Justin Hunter's short TD catch before he hauled in a 6-yard touchdown catch of his own later on.

I wrote about Preston at work on Friday.

“He’s a really good player. He’s been doing that day in, day out at practice,” Loggains said. “He made a big statement for his case to be on this football team again tonight.”

Verner and Turner: Cornerback Alterraun Verner and center Rob Turner started and did nothing that should dent them as the favorites to be named the starters at their respective spots.

Verner was flagged for two penalties against Jones -- a pass interference on a short pass into the middle and an illegal contact on a longer throw. I thought the first one was a good play on a ball Ryan threw a bit behind Jones. Later, Jones beat Verner, who didn’t touch him near the line, on a 42-yard play up the right side. Jones is going to make plays against a lot of corners.

And while Tommie Campbell came in early enough to have a couple chances against Jones and wasn’t victimized in a similar way, he didn’t do anything that should change the Titans' leanings.

Battle vs. Parmele: I thought Jackie Battle was getting a bit too much hype heading into the game. He was running better than Jalen Parmele, but special teams will be a huge factor in one of them winning the No. 3 running back job. I was told before the game, however, that he's close to Parmele on special teams. Battle got a game-high 13 carries for 41 yards. Parmele didn’t get one. Advantage Battle.

Referee change: Ed Hochuli was the ref in the first half, but by design, the game turned over to Wayne Mackie in the second half. He’s typically a field judge. The league is looking for opportunities to get people experience. Mackie communicated well when he had to use his microphone.

But Mackie was buzzed to review Alford’s interception of Fitzpatrick on a throw intended for Hunter. There was absolutely no reason for replay assistant Roger Ruth to buzz Mackie to review that play except to give him practice at it.

And whether the league needs to get a guy game experience or not, two teams, a crowd and a TV audience should not be subject to an unneeded challenge for such purposes.

Pending cuts? The first round of cuts come Tuesday, when the Titans have to get from 90 to 75. Healthy guys who don’t play in the third preseason game are typically being kept from getting hurt, because a team can’t cut an injured player.

Healthy Titans who didn’t play in this game were receiver Justin Hilton, defensive end Nigel Nicholas, guard Oscar Johnson, tackle Barry Richardson, tight end Martell Webb and receiver Rashad Ross. It'll be a surprise if any of them are on the roster Tuesday evening.
Reading the coverage of the Titans ...

Saying it’s just the preseason doesn’t make David Climer of The Tennessean feel better about what he’s seen from the Titans. “There’s something troubling about the way the Titans are going about their business. This is a crossroads season, yet there seems to be no sense (of) urgency.”

To which I say: It is concerning. Part of it is the vanilla approach, but they should be better even when they are vanilla. And they aren’t good enough to simply flip a switch when the games count.

The Titans expect to activate Delanie Walker from PUP this week, says John Glennon of The Tennessean, who also offers an injury update and details of how Moise Fokou has pretty much won the starting middle linebacker job.

It’s getting harder to figure out Kamerion Wimbley's role, says Glennon.

To which I say: He was used too much last season, but it looks like a guy who got a five-year, $35 million contract may not be used enough to make him worth it this season.

A breakdown of the offense against Cincinnati from Tom Gower of Total Titans. He says Geno Atkins gave Andy Levitre fits and the Titans were in three-wide over half of the snaps.

To which I say: Atkins is going to give just about any guard fits.

The Titans running back tandem is gaining steam, says Craig Peters of the team’s web site.

An interesting point on kickers from an examination of Rob Bironas and the potential for drop-off, from Music City Miracles. “What appears likely ... is that kickers are attempting such a small number of field goals each season that 1-3 additional misses greatly drops their average."

I love this picture of Mohamed Sanu’s touchdown catch against Tommie Campbell based on the background from Paul Brown Stadium. From Music City Miracles.

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