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An Andy Reid staff stalwart since the beginning, Brad Childress eager for next role

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- When Andy Reid got his initial head coaching job with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1999, he hired an assistant off the staff at the University of Wisconsin by the name of Brad Childress to be his quarterbacks coach. Philadelphia’s starting quarterback that season was a journeyman, Doug Pederson, who had played for Reid when he was an assistant with the Green Bay Packers.

A few years later, Childress became the Eagles’ offensive coordinator and other than 4½ seasons as head coach of the Minnesota Vikings and one as the coordinator for the Cleveland Browns, he’s been with Reid ever since.

“I’ve seen this thing from its infancy from back when I was coaching Doug as a quarterback,’’ Childress said.

Childress will again help Reid run an offense. An assistant for the Kansas City Chiefs for the past three seasons, Childress is now co-offensive coordinator along with quarterbacks coach Matt Nagy. They will replace Pederson, who moved on to the Philadelphia, where he will be the Eagles’ head coach.

“Matt’s got a great mind and obviously Andy has a fertile mind and I’ll be able to add to that,’’ Childress said.

On game day, Reid will be the primary playcaller, Childress will provide a set of eyes from up high in the press box and Nagy will be on the sideline and the voice in Alex Smith's ear on the coach-to-quarterback headset.

Other than that, specific duties are yet to be handed out. Childress doesn’t see himself bumping into Reid or Nagy on game day or during the week when the game plan is being hammered out and dispersed to the players.

“I really don’t think that’s a big issue,’’ Childress said. “It’s not like everybody’s sneaking to the microphone at once when the play comes up. All that stuff kind of gets worked out beforehand. Situationally, it’s on your game plan that way. You have choices on that menu, but we’re going to spend enough time together so we’re going to be able to finish each other’s sentences.’’

Childress came to the Chiefs in 2013 with Reid, but until Thursday carried the unusual title of spread-game analyst and special-projects coach. He indicated he was eager to get back to a more conventional coaching role in helping to prepare a playbook and the weekly game plan.

“I think you’re always [eager] to do that,’’ he said. “But it kind of opened up some new horizons in being able to look at the whole league and trends around the whole league. I think it helped [Reid] particularly when we had a Monday night game where you’re still having to stay on that opponent on that Monday night so the [next] week is going to be short for you and you’re able to look ahead to the next opponent. I know it does on Thursday night, which we had early in the season. I was able to present him with a game plan as I saw it.’’