If Bruce Arians had an accountablity sheet

June, 19, 2014
6/19/14
10:50
PM ET
In an awkward yet funny segment Thursday on Fox Sports Radio's "Jay Mohr Sports" with comedian turned sports talk radio host Jay Mohr, Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians mentioned Arizona's accountability sheet.

Arians
Arians
For those who don't know, the accountability sheet is posted daily with a list of mistakes -- both mental and physical errors -- from the previous day's practice. It's used to keep players accountable for their play in front of their teammates.

Well, Mohr turned the tables on Arians, asking the coach why he'd be on the accountability sheet if there was one for coaches. And Arians didn't hesitate to answer.

"Last year? Oh, probably blew a few timeouts when I should've taken one or not taken one," Arians said.

But he wasn't done.

"I get a little heated at referees way too much," he continued, adding that he knows his reputation for getting on a ref's case. "I've got to calm down a little bit as far as officials."

Before that, though, the segment got awkward when Mohr began asking about cornerback Patrick Peterson holding out of organized team activities, which are voluntary. It's true that Peterson didn't attend OTAs, but his absence was excused so he could spend more time with his wife, who's in medical school and doesn't get much free time. Peterson attended minicamp, which was mandatory.

"He didn't miss any time," Arians said.

"He was there for minicamp, no questions asked. I knew he would be."

Mohr said he read an article that Peterson missed OTAs and it was clear Mohr didn't understand the difference between minicamp and OTAs. But he owned up to it

"I had that wrong," Mohr said to Arians. "I completely apologize then."

Josh Weinfuss

ESPN Arizona Cardinals reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.