Let's turn lights out on conspiracy theories

October, 1, 2013
10/01/13
12:53
AM ET
Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs became the latest player from the defending champions to bring up a conspiracy theory for the Super Bowl blackout, pointing the finger at NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for the unprecedented Super Bowl moment.

“I was like Vegas, parlor tricks, you know what I mean?," Suggs said on ESPN's "E:60." "I was like, ahh, Roger Goodell, he never stops, he always has something up his sleeve. He just couldn’t let us have this one in a landslide huh?”

Asked if he thought Goodell had turned the lights out, Suggs said, “I thought he had a hand in it. Most definitely, he had a hand in it."

Can we all agree to stop coming up with these ridiculous accusations? This makes the Ravens look more paranoid than prestigious. I could see the Ravens continually talking about this if they had lost. But the Ravens overcame that 34-minute delay and just have to let it go.

The Superdome, where the Super Bowl was held, is an old building. The company responsible for supplying power to the stadium said after the game that faulty equipment was to blame for the blackout. It does not sound like CSI New Orleans has to get involved with this one.

It is not like this is the first time the lights had gone out in an NFL game. In December 2011, I was at San Francisco's Candlestick Park when there were two power outages. I guess Goodell really wanted the 49ers to beat the Steelers that time.

This Super Bowl conspiracy theory started when linebacker Ray Lewis hinted on the "America's Game" documentary series that the power outage may have been a ploy to help the 49ers regroup. Now, Suggs thinks Goodell was involved.

My hope is we can turn the lights out on all of these crazy conspiracy theories.

Jamison Hensley

ESPN Ravens reporter

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