Ravens' position analysis: Quarterbacks

January, 20, 2014
Jan 20
12:30
PM ET
For the next two weeks, let's a take a position-by-position review of the Baltimore Ravens' 2013 season and give a sneak peek of what lies ahead:

QUARTERBACKS

Under contract: Joe Flacco, Tyrod Taylor and Nick Stephens (practice squad).

2014 free agents: None.

The good: Not much in this category in what was a nightmarish season for the reigning Super Bowl Most Valuable Player. It may not have seemed this way, but Flacco threw for a career-high 3,912 yards. He was able to put up this total without much help from an offensive line or running game. Flacco's biggest improvement was throwing outside the pocket, which came out of necessity. His four-game winning drives accounted for half of the Ravens' win total this season.

The bad: Flacco threw 22 interceptions, which were tied for second-most in the NFL. In fact, Flacco had as many interceptions this season as he did in the previous two seasons combined. Not having last season's top two receivers (Anquan Boldin and Dennis Pitta) for most of 2013 played a major factor in the turnovers. Flacco also was sacked a career-high 48 times, and he has to learn to get rid of the ball quicker. He took a beating and ended the season with a sprained MCL in his left knee. The lack of consistency on throwing the deep ball was a problem. Flacco's 24.3 completion rate on passes of 30 yards or longer was 25th in the NFL.

The money (2014 salary-cap numbers): Flacco ($14.8 million) and Taylor ($671,327). The Ravens are set to go with Flacco as their starter for a seventh consecutive season. His cap number doesn't become a burden until the 2016 season. Taylor is an inexpensive option as a backup. The Ravens will likely bring in competition at backup like they did in 2012 (Curtis Painter) and 2013 (Caleb Hanie).

Draft priority: Very low. The Ravens haven't used a pick on a quarterback since taking Taylor in the sixth round in 2011.

Jamison Hensley

ESPN Ravens reporter

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