Under the radar: Baylor

July, 25, 2013
7/25/13
4:00
PM ET
Far too often a player enters the season with a profile that doesn't quite match his worth to the team.

In other words, players who are coming in under the radar. We'll start a new series today looking at those guys who should get more respect and attention than they have this offseason.

Next up: Baylor

Under the radar: RB Glasco Martin

Everybody wants to talk about the defensive improvement at Baylor, or whether or not Bryce Petty will be the next in a long line of great quarterbacks under coach Art Briles.

Lache Seastrunk speaks for himself. Loudly and confidently, I might add. However, it's his position mate who flies well under the radar across the conference and is perhaps even underrated by Baylor fans. Martin is just as important to Baylor's offense and its hopes for a Big 12 title in 2013. Seastrunk has the flash and the well-deserved hype after a crazy finish to the 2012 season, but Martin is the other half of the backfield and an absolute hammer in short yardage.

He's more than capable of starting for at least half of the Big 12 teams, coming off an 889-yard season on just 179 carries and an eye-popping 15 touchdowns. That was the second-most in Baylor history. Last season was the first time the Bears really gave him much responsibility, and he answered. For as much attention as Baylor's high-flying offense attracts, the Bears actually ran the ball more often than they threw it last season, and the basis of the offense is a power running game built on physicality at the line of scrimmage. Jay Finley had it. Then Terrance Ganaway had it. This season, Martin brings the thundering boom to Seastrunk's flash of lightning, giving Baylor the best 1-2 punch at running back in the Big 12.

When Baylor gets in short-yardage situations, Martin is the man it will call on. He's tough to bring down at 6-foot-1, 220 pounds, and runs as angry as any back in the Big 12. Baylor will ask him to earn the toughest yards on the field, and he's more than capable of getting them.

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