Big 12: Blake Muir

Big 12 morning links

August, 15, 2014
Aug 15
8:00
AM ET
Happy Friday everybody. The first glorious Saturday of the season is now two weeks and a day away. Hang in there, we're just so close. Here's what happening in Big 12 country:
  • The Oklahoman is reporting the Joe Mixon case is finally seeing some progress: The alleged victim is believed to have interviewed with police Thursday. Even if, as hoped, the case is turned over to a DA by the end of the week, Jenny Carlson points out that this isn't your typical "Law & Order" episode. OU obviously wants some clarity with the season two weeks away, but this process is going to take time, and who knows how it might play out? Still, after a relatively quiet three weeks, it's good to hear we're getting a little closer.
  • Now that quarterback Davis Webb is in his second year and the uncontested starter, Kliff Kingsbury is ready to entrust him with more duties. Kingsbury told Don Williams of the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal he's giving Webb more responsibility to change the play at the line. "He’s always had freedom," Kingsbury said. "I just feel like with his comfort level, he’ll take more risk as far as believing what he sees out there and getting us into a play." That's what makes the prospect of three more years of the Kingsbury-Webb duo scary: Once he gets confident with running the show on his own, look out.
  • This is my favorite fall camp position battle in the Big 12 and it's not even close: LaQuan McGowan vs. Blake Muir. The competition to replace Cyril Richardson at left guard on Baylor's line is still rolling. McGowan is the 6-foot-8, 400-pound monster we wrote about earlier this week, the one Art Briles calls "2034" because he assumes linemen will be that big in 20 years. He'll have to beat out Muir, the Australian who has a year of starting experience under his belt from his time at Hawaii. Whoever wins has to work well alongside Spencer Drango and keep Bryce Petty clean, so it's a critical job.
  • Now this is a wonderful story: Kansas defensive lineman T.J. Semke was put on scholarship this week. If you happen to skip a court date in the Kansas City area, you could have a chance to meet him. Semke is a bounty hunter in his spare time who made the Jayhawks' roster after seeing an ad for a tryout in the college newspaper. Now he's a second-string defensive tackle tasked with hunting quarterbacks. Hard not to root for that dude.
  • As Mike Gundy maintains his relative silence about his quarterback plan, Mason Rudolph has to be wondering where he stands. His high school coach told Kyle Fredrickson of The Oklahoman that Rudolph "wants to be the starter right now." That same coach also hopes he redshirts, for the betterment of his development. Gundy has been coy about his plans for using the true freshman from South Carolina. Considering how fellow backup Daxx Garman has raised his game lately, I think the redshirt is probably a safe bet at this point.
WACO, Texas -- Two years ago, Baylor’s backup quarterback rounded up the starting offensive linemen in the preseason and took them to Chuy’s for a Mexican feast on his dime. He wasn’t playing in 2012, but he understood the importance of keeping the big boys well fed.

Last August, Bryce Petty took the gang to Olive Garden. This time he brought six linemen. They capitalized on his kindness.

“They had appetizers and salads and two entrees -- one to take home, which was ridiculous,” Petty said. “I didn’t think they needed that, but I couldn’t really tell them no.”

[+] EnlargeSpencer Drango
AP Photo/Tony GutierrezJunior tackle Spencer Drango is one of the leaders of the Baylor offensive line.
The final bill? More than $120. Petty would love to make these lineman dinners a weekly staple in 2014, but as he put it, “The budget doesn’t really call for that all the time.”

Tackle Troy Baker got the Olive Garden invite despite being out with a torn ACL, so he was especially appreciative. The love Petty has always shown his linemen, even before he was a starter or Big 12 Player of the Year, isn’t lost on them.

“He’s going to take care of his big guys. He knows we’ll get beat up and we’ll work for him,” Baker said. “He knows what we mean to him. We know how important he is to us.”

But Petty still has to tread lightly among his linemen in the locker room. Baylor’s offensive line room is full of athletic freaks, blue-collar grinders and loudmouths, plus a Brit and two Aussies. And they can be merciless, even to QB1.

“Sometimes he’ll come in wearing his decked-out Nike stuff, looking like Tiger, or he’ll be wearing neon yellow Nike stuff head to toe,” Baker said. “We’ll give him some crap about that.”

Petty doesn’t get it as bad as Jason Osei, the 27-year-old sophomore from London with a martial arts and rugby background. He gets called “Pickle” on the days he’s wearing his green skull cap, shirt, shorts and shoes.

“He’s a character, man,” tackle Spencer Drango said. “All the girls love him for his accent. It’s pretty thick. We have a joke about who won the Revolutionary War. He says it was a tie.”

Then you have brothers Blake Muir and Sean Muir, who arrived in Waco last year. Blake started 12 games at Hawaii in 2012 before transferring. Sean had never played football before joining the Bears. Their accents are just as beloved.

Blake is competing for the left guard job with LaQuan McGowan, a young man who might be from the future.

“LaQuan is legitimately 6-foot-8, 400 pounds,” Baker said. “He’s strong as can be. Coach [Art] Briles always says he’s 20 years out of his time. It’s unbelievable physically what he can do.

“You can’t do anything to him. You literally can’t. He can cut you in line and, even as another offensive lineman, you’re like, ‘Go ahead, buddy. It’s yours. All you.’”

Drango jokes that the first time he shook hands with McGowan, his freshman-year roommate, he almost lost his.

“I have big hands,” Drango said. “He completely dwarfed my hand and almost crushed it.”

McGowan or Muir will line up to the right of Drango, an All-Big 12 tackle and NFL prospect who’s fully recovered from the back injury that ended his 2013 season early. His backup, Pat Colbert, is known as “Sinbad” in the locker room. Look up his mug shot and it’s easy to see why.

At center, there’s Kyle Fuller, a redshirt sophomore who’s described as no-nonsense and “very blue-collar” by teammates. Desmine Hilliard is the starting right guard and also an All-American at throwing the discus; he set school records at the NCAA track and field championships last year.

The backup at right tackle, Tyler Edwards, gets called “The Undertaker” for his hair. And then you have Baker, who’s back from the torn ACL and can’t wait to see what this group does at full strength.

[+] EnlargePetty
AP Photo/LM OteroBryce Petty knows his success is tied to staying upright, and he has a top-notch offensive line upon whom to rely.
As one of the old guys in the line room, Baker says he has witnessed an evolution in the past four years. The Waco native swears he wouldn’t have been recruited by BU if he were a high schooler today. He wouldn't have been good enough.

“To be honest, I don’t think I would,” the former three-star recruit said. “They don’t have to. They can recruit the studs, and the studs come after them now.”

Randy Clements, Baylor’s line coach, has been working alongside Briles since 1989. He oversaw linemen and power lifting back in their Stephenville High days. His linemen say he’s brilliant, a coach capable of developing anybody. At Baylor, he’s produced an NFL draft pick in six straight years.

The line began breaking through, in Baker's estimation, late in the 2012 season. Injuries hit the group hard last year during the stretch run, but they plugged in new starters and survived. Having All-American left guard Cyril Richardson to learn from no doubt helped.

“We had a perfect example,” Baker said. “His technique was flawless and that’s why he was so successful. He was able to do everything Coach Clem asked.”

As Clements’ linemen describe it, fall camp can be brutal. This 19-man line group averages 6-5 and 305 pounds. In practice, they run just as hard as everyone else to prep for hustling to the line of scrimmage. You can’t sustain a four-plays-per-minute tempo without practicing faster than you play.

And while Petty, his trio of running backs and his endless supply of receivers get all the attention, his offensive linemen will be busy doing the dirty work.

Drango and Baker, the leaders of the gang, were stuck on the sidelines when Baylor’s undefeated season fell apart at Oklahoma State. They know the run game faltered late, averaging 168 yards per game and 3.7 per carry in the final four games after putting up 300 a game and 6.0 per carry in the first nine. The seniors vow it can’t happen again.

“We go as they go. I’ve always said that,” Petty said. “I’m just praying those guys stay healthy.”

His linemen are practicing and conditioning this month with December on their minds. Sure, they love to mess with each other and tease their quarterback in their spare time. But when it comes to title talk, they’re not joking around.

“As we get closer to November,” Baker said, “we plan on being in contention for the playoff."

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