Big 12: Darrell Wyatt

Lunch links: The Big 12's best players

December, 19, 2012
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Christmas shopping, y'all.
The silly season can get dizzying at times. We'll update this if necessary, but here's where the Big 12 coaching carousel has currently landed after a few big spins.

BAYLOR
  • No changes.
  • Head coach Art Briles was reportedly contacted by Arkansas and Texas Tech, but signed a new extension with Baylor and hasn't expressed interest in any jobs or admitted to any interviews.
IOWA STATE
  • No changes.
  • Head coach Paul Rhoads reportedly drew interest from Wisconsin, but Rhoads went on the record this week to say he has no interest in replacing Bret Bielema in Madison.
KANSAS
  • No changes.
KANSAS STATE
  • No changes.
OKLAHOMA
  • Co-offensive coordinator Josh Heupel was a candidate for the Louisiana Tech opening last week, but reportedly turned down the job. The Bulldogs eventually hired Skip Holtz to replace Sonny Dykes.
  • Co-offensive coordinator Jay Norvell has also reportedly drawn interest from other schools, but it sounds like he's staying at Oklahoma.
OKLAHOMA STATE
  • Offensive coordinator Todd Monken left to become the head coach at Southern Miss.
  • Head coach Mike Gundy reportedly interviewed with both Tennessee and Arkansas and some local reports even indicated that he had accepted the Arkansas job, but they ultimately proved to be false. Gundy has since gone on record saying there's "no question" he'll be the Cowboys' head coach in 2013.
  • Defensive coordinator Bill Young on if he'll return next season or retire: "I don’t know, I don’t know," Young told The Oklahoman. "I’m going to think about it."
TEXAS
  • Co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin left to become the head coach at Arkansas State.
  • Co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite replaces Harsin as the playcaller and will coach quarterbacks now. Texas plans to replace him as running backs coach after the season ends.
  • Receivers coach Darrell Wyatt was promoted to co-offensive coordinator.
  • Defensive coordinator Manny Diaz reportedly interviewed with Florida International, but removed himself from consideration and will stay at Texas.
TCU
  • No changes.
  • Head coach Gary Patterson was reportedly a leading candidate to replace John L. Smith at Arkansas, but there were no reports of interviews or significant contact between the two parties.
TEXAS TECH
  • Head coach Tommy Tuberville left to become the head coach at Cincinnati.
  • Offensive coordinator Neal Brown left to become the offensive coordinator at Kentucky on Mark Stoops' staff.
  • Texas A&M offensive coordinator Kliff Kingsbury accepted an offer to replace Tuberville as Tech's head coach.
  • Ex-Red Raiders Kevin Curtis and Eric Morris will join Kingsbury's staff. Curtis told reporters he will likely coach the cornerbacks. Morris' role on the staff is still undetermined. He previously coached inside receivers for Mike Leach at Washington State.
WEST VIRGINIA
  • Dana Holgorsen relieved cornerbacks coach Daron Roberts of his duties and moved co-defensive coordinator Keith Patterson to defensive playcaller, replacing co-defensive coordinator Joe DeForest as playcaller. DeForest is still on staff.
  • Graduate assistant Andrew McGee (who led the Big 12 in interceptions at Oklahoma State in 2010, with five) will coach cornerbacks heading into the bowl game, but WVU will find a permanent replacement after the season.

Source: Texas going back on co-OC route

December, 12, 2012
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Texas' co-offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin is headed to Arkansas State, but his partner at offensive coordinator won't take over on his own.

The Longhorns' Major Applewhite will take over playcalling, a source told colleague Joe Schad, but will be joined by Darrell Wyatt as a co-offensive coordinator.

Applewhite will also move over to coach quarterbacks. He had coached running backs previously.

For more on this story, go here.
AUSTIN, Texas -- Bryan Harsin knows what he faces now -- a tougher schedule, bigger stadiums, louder crowds, better athletes, more expectations and plenty of pressure.

[+] EnlargeMack Brown, Bryan Harsin
Brendan Maloney/US PresswireHeading into his second season co-coordinating the Texas offense for Mack Brown, Bryan Harsin, right, says he's more comfortable.
Maybe more importantly he knows with whom he faces it -- a coach that understands the pressures of being a quarterback at Texas (Major Applewhite), a coach that delegates and does not dictate (Mack Brown), a head coach who thinks wide receivers should block first, second and third, then think about pass patterns (Darrell Wyatt), and a throwback with more grunts than glad handing (Stacy Searels). And that is just on the offensive side of the ball.

In all, six members of Texas’ staff are sophomores now. They have lived the life for a year. And, after being 8-5 together, they have lived to see another.

“Now we understand what we’re doing,” said Harsin, the co-offensive coordinator along with Applewhite. “We understand the details. We understand how each of us operates. And what the expectations of each positions are.”

"Even at our coaches' retreat a couple of weeks ago, the guys were all on the same page and it went so much smoother,” Brown said. “Last year they were talking about what are you doing in pregame warmups. They were talking about where we stay the night before the game.

“Now all of those things they know. We are so much further along than we were, and that leads to more excitement as we start the season as well.”

That progress is not just owed to those position coaches. Included among those six is strength and conditioning coach Bennie Wylie. The backbone of the program, Wylie is the one who has pushed the players to stand tall, and at the same time, turned the head of Brown as to what expectations a cohesive staff can put on these players.

It’s that work that has Brown talking about Texas being a tougher football team. And everybody knows a fist is much tougher to defend against than a slap. A fist is what Texas considers itself now that it has come together.

“Now we all know what is expected of everyone else,” junior offensive guard Mason Walters said.

That’s from the coaches straight on down the line. But, like everything else, it starts at the top. In this case, that means with the coaching staff.

Now that the staff is together, the coaches can be more calculating in their approaches.

“When you have had more time together, you have identified who you are, what you want to do, this is what we can major in and now from a personnel standpoint, whether it is recruiting or on the field, this is how we’re going to place people to do these certain things,” Harsin said. “Everybody has got that in their minds in the staff now and that makes it easier on all of us as a staff now. Instead of one guy trying to figure out who needs to go where, everybody knows where guys need to go and what’s the best group to have on the field.”

That means Applewhite and Harsin, who now know each other’s strengths and weaknesses, have more efficiently been able to work to find the strengths and weaknesses in the two quarterbacks, fix those problems and find solutions. Similarly, the pair is more comfortable putting their heads together on just how to deploy the three-headed backfield that is Malcolm Brown, Joe Bergeron and Johnathan Gray.

“This time last year we were talking about a Boise offense and Mississippi State defense and what flavor will Georgia have with their offense and what about [co-recruiting coordinator/wide receivers coach] Darrell Wyatt and his travels and how much will that change what we do offensively,” Mack Brown said. “And now we have a Texas offense that we are working toward and the players believe in, and the same thing defensively. So very little talk about anything other than Texas and us moving forward.’’

That means moving forward as one instead of many.
AUSTIN, Texas -- D.J. Monroe has shown flashes, but to this point, they've been little more.

The most memorable? An 80-yard scamper in Red River in 2010 to jolt the Longhorns awake from an early 14-0 deficit.

Monroe's role in the offense has been minimal, but his gamebreaking potential is enormous. That's clear to everyone, including Texas' coaching staff.

Monroe, despite his speed, would likely be little more than Texas' fourth-string running back next fall after Joe Bergeron and Malcolm Brown established themselves as top runners in 2011 and the nation's No. 1 high school running back -- Johnathan Gray -- en route to Austin this summer.

Texas' response? Helping Monroe get on the field by working him at receiver, where the Longhorns are much thinner.

"The best play D.J. has for us is the speed sweep, and he is a wide receiver when he does that," Texas coach Mack Brown said. "He will work more with (receivers coach) Darrell Wyatt the latter part of practice so we can try to get him in the game without giving it away that he's in there only for a play that he runs."

That could mean a bigger role for the bubble screen in Monroe's arsenal, too.

For Texas, though, it's a great move and a necessary one.

Monroe's a running back at heart. Brown made that clear.

"He can do things in space. So we've been trying to force tailback on him when our tailbacks are now 205 to 240, and that's not his game," Brown said. "He's 165 pounds, 170 pounds, and he needs to be a space player. And I think we've got something that can help him if he can grow in that area."

Giving Monroe the ball on bubbles like Oklahoma did with Ryan Broyles could birth big results next season. Monroe's a gamebreaker waiting to happen, but with his limited package, his touches have been minimal.

If Monroe can prove the slant route or a quick out are legitimate options defenses must respect, the whole team should be better off. It sounds small, but keep an eye out for big results.

And though Texas wants balance, don't expect the Longhorns to lose sight of what this move is really about.

"He needs to be outside," Brown said. "That's who he is."
Spring football is in full swing. Three teams from the Big 12 (Texas Tech, Baylor, Texas) are already done, and the last team in the Big 12 to start (Kansas State) kicked off on Wednesday.

That leaves seven teams in the Big 12 on the field, but who's coaching them? We've had plenty of teams shift coordinators this season, so here's a quick refresher if you've been busy following basketball since the season ended and the coaching carousel began spinning.

BAYLOR

Defensive coordinator: Phil Bennett. He replaces Brian Norwood, who moved to associate head coach and secondary coach. Bennett was previously the defensive coordinator at Pittsburgh, where he coordinated the nation's No. 8 defense.

KANSAS

Offensive coordinator: David Beaty. He spent a year at Rice, but returned to Kansas to coach receivers and serve as co-offensive coordinator alongside Chuck Long. He replaces Darrell Wyatt, who left to coach receivers at Texas. Long retained play-calling duties.

OKLAHOMA

Offensive coordinator: Josh Heupel and Jay Norvell. They'll share offensive coordinator duties, with Heupel calling the plays. He did so during the Sooners' 48-20 win over Connecticut in the Fiesta Bowl. They'll replace Kevin Wilson, who left to become the head coach at Indiana. Heupel will continue to coach quarterbacks as he has since 2006. Norvell will continue to coach receivers as he has since 2008.

OKLAHOMA STATE

Offensive coordinator: Todd Monken. He'll replace Dana Holgorsen, who took over as offensive coordinator at West Virginia and is scheduled to replace Bill Stewart as the head coach in 2012. Monken previously coached receivers for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

TEXAS

Offensive coordinator: Bryan Harsin and Major Applewhite. Harsin spent a decade at Boise State and five years as offensive coordinator, and will replace Greg Davis, the longtime coordinator under Mack Brown who resigned after the 2010 season. Applewhite is the co-coordinator after coaching running backs since 2008, but Harsin will call plays.

Defensive coordinator: Manny Diaz. Another young coach, Diaz was at Middle Tennessee State in 2009 and coordinated the defense at Mississippi State under Dan Mullen last season. He replaces Will Muschamp, who left to become head coach at Florida.

TEXAS TECH

Defensive coordinator: Chad Glasgow. Previously the secondary coach at TCU, Glasgow helped the Horned Frogs win the Rose Bowl last year and parlayed his recent excellence into a coordinator gig in Lubbock, where he'll replace James Willis, who left the program in December, before the Red Raiders beat Northwestern in the inaugural TicketCity Bowl.

Roundup: UT salaries, key recruiting moves

January, 31, 2011
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A few notes and nuggets from the offseason weekend that was:

Before Mack Brown began his coaching search that eventually required him to make six offseason hires, he met with the Texas Board of Regents to discuss coaching salaries. It sounds like they were, uh, receptive to what he had to say.

After a shocking and disappointing 5-7 season in 2010, Brown's assistants received hefty raises. Brown is expected to meet with the media in Austin later today for the first time since the season finale, a home loss to Texas A&M. Texas already sat comfortably at the top of the heap in assistant coaches' pay, and these latest raises only accentuate that. No one is making what defensive coordinator Will Muschamp made ($907,000) in 2010, but you definitely won't hear any complaints coming from the football facilities any time soon.

Here's a breakdown of last year and this year's salary among the coaching staff, courtesy of the Austin American-Statesman.

Defensive coordinator
  • 2011: Manny Diaz - $625,000 (made $260,000 at Mississippi State in 2009)
  • 2010: Will Muschamp - $907,000 (took Florida head coach job)
Offensive coordinator
  • 2011: Bryan Harsin (will call plays) - $625,000 (made $259,520 at Boise State in 2009)
  • 2011: Major Applewhite (also coaches running backs) - $500,00 (made 269,509 in 2010)
  • 2010: Greg Davis - $477,084 (resigned after season)
Tight ends
  • 2011: Bruce Chambers - $200,000
  • 2010: Bruce Chambers - $187,039
Defensive ends
  • 2011: Oscar Giles - $200,000
  • 2010: Oscar Giles - $162,451
Defensive backs
  • 2011: Jerry Gray - $425,000 (previous NFL salary unknown)
  • 2010 Duane Akina - $318,509 (left for Arizona)
Offensive line
  • 2011: Stacy Searels - $425,000 (made 301,200 at Georgia in 2010)
  • 2010: Mac McWhorter - $292,759
Receivers
  • 2011: Darrell Wyatt - $315,000 (made 250,000 at Kansas in 2010)
  • 2010: Bobby Kennedy - 212,519 (took receivers coach job at Colorado)

Life as a Longhorn right now? Well, last season's struggles aside, it's clearly pretty good.


Huskers find a new kicker

Nebraska will need a lot of new faces on special teams, after punter/kicker Alex Henery and kickoff specialist Adi Kunalic both exhausted their eligibility following the 2010 season.

The Huskers had a commit for their 2011 class, Niklas Sade, but he decommitted and pledged to North Carolina State last month.

The solution: Nebraska went after Mauro Bondi, a Boca Raton, Fla. native and (former) Wake Forest commit who has an impressive YouTube highlight reel and sounds ready to replace Henery.

"I definitely followed him, so I have to live up to that and maybe do even better," he told the Lincoln Journal Star.

Bondi gives Nebraska 18 commits for its 2011 class. ESPN.com ranks the Huskers' class No. 14 nationally.


Cowboys' top commit 'solid'

One player who doesn't sound like he's decommitting or recommitting anywhere is ESPNU 150 member and running back Herschel Sims, Oklahoma State's top commit.

The Cowboys' running backs coach, Robert Gillespie, left Oklahoma State to join former offensive coordinator Dana Holgorsen at West Virginia. Sims had reportedly been wavering earlier in the recruiting season, but took his official visit to Stillwater in January and his high school coach told the Tulsa World that Sims is solid with the Cowboys and ready to sign on Wednesday, adding that there isn't "any doubt about it."
"During his official visit, he called that Saturday night and said, 'I can’t imagine playing anywhere else,' Sims' coach, Steve Warren, said. "He loved it."

With Sims, Oklahoma State has 27 recruits committed to its 2011 class, which can begin signing letters of intent on Wednesday. ESPN.com ranks Oklahoma State's class No. 20 nationally.

Lunch links: Who sold out 2010 games?

January, 14, 2011
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You guys totally missed Sunday dinner.
Manny Diaz, the defensive coordinator at Mississippi State, has been hired for the same job at Texas, confirming multiple reports throughout the day on Wednesday.

"I was very flattered when I heard from Coach [Mack] Brown about this tremendous opportunity," Diaz said in a news release. "It was not something I sought out, but Coach Brown called, was very complimentary of our season and asked if I was interested in talking. I was very interested immediately. I'm really looking forward to being a part of a great team and staff. That all starts with Coach Brown and everything he's done to make Texas great. Just having the chance to be a cog in that wheel is really exciting to me."

Diaz is Texas' third hire after five positions came open at the end of the season. Bo Davis, previously at Alabama, has been hired to coach defensive tackles. Darrell Wyatt, previously at Kansas, has been hired to coach receivers.

The hire also means that Texas' defensive staff is set for the 2011 season.

"After an extensive search, including conversations with head coaches and offensive coordinators around the country, Manny's name continued to come up," Brown said. "He's a bright, young coach who brings a lot of energy to our program. Manny's been a tremendous staff person everywhere he has been, and he will fit in perfectly with our guys here. When you add him and Bo (Davis) to Duane (Akina) and Oscar (Giles), that's a defensive staff I'm really excited about moving forward with."
New Texas receivers coach Darrell Wyatt took the job earlier this week, making his fifth stop in the Big 12. Despite the uncertainty surrounding the Longhorns, who still must replace four coaches, he didn't see it as a reason to stay away from Austin.

"When you get an opportunity to come to a place like The University of Texas and work with a guy like Mack Brown and [the] great staff he is putting together and all the resources we have here, it's really tough to say no," Wyatt told reporters this week. "I was on board, my wife was obviously on board, and we're excited to be at The University of Texas."

Wyatt replaces Bobby Kennedy, who left Texas to coach receivers at Colorado.

As a coach at Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Baylor and Kansas previously, among others, Wyatt has spent plenty of time recruiting in Texas. As such, he'll also be the Longhorns' co-recruiting coordinator.

"I've had experiences in just about every part of the state. I've recruited the Dallas Metroplex area. At one point I recruited Houston as well as East Texas. Obviously, my wife is from San Antonio and me being from Killeen - central Texas, so I've recruited just about every part of the state," Wyatt said. "Recruiting is a people business, and you have to develop relationships with the coaches first then the kids. Making sure there is a trust there and obviously selling them a place like Texas certainly makes it easier. It's still a battle. There are a lot of good things and good places to sell, but again, I like my chances here with all the resources and the great tradition."

The Longhorns receivers struggled in 2010, and Wyatt will be charged with eliminating those issues. Marquise Goodwin and Malcolm Williams' development has been stunted, but the good news for the Longhorns is their leading receiver in 2010 was a freshman, Mike Davis, who finished with 47 catches for 478 yards and two of just 10 touchdown catches on the season for Texas. Fellow freshman Darius White was also a five-star recruit in the 2010 class who had difficulty finding early success.

"I don't want to judge the guys or make any evaluation before I see them," he said. "I'm familiar with some of their names, and I know they're talented. I'm looking forward to the challenge of the spring and bringing those guys along."

He'll get started for real when Texas kicks off spring practice in a few weeks, but the draw of Austin and the Longhorns was too much for Wyatt to resist at Kansas as an assistant under Turner Gill.

"Obviously, it's a special job for me because of its location -- because being in Texas and because of the great history and tradition. You walk down the hallways here and the tradition oozes out at you," he said. "It's a special place, and I'm just glad to be here."

Lunch links: Cotton Bowl wants in the BCS

January, 3, 2011
1/03/11
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Why are you wearing a tux?

It's after 6. What am I, a farmer?

Texas fills one of its coaching vacancies

January, 2, 2011
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Texas has hired Kansas receivers coach Darrell Wyatt to coach the same position for the Longhorns.

"We are so excited about the addition of Darrell to our staff," Texas coach Mack Brown said in a release. "He's not only one of the best wide receiver coaches in the country, but he also brings expertise as an offensive coordinator. Darrell's someone who has coached in the NFL and has been recognized as one of the nation’s top recruiters. He has extensive experience working in the Big 12 and recruiting in all parts of Texas. He is a great addition to our staff."

He'll replace former Longhorns receivers coach Bobby Kennedy, who went back to his hometown of Boulder, Colo. to coach receivers at Colorado under new coach Jon Embree.

"This is just a tremendous opportunity for me and my family,” Wyatt said in a release. "Being a part of a program with such great history and tradition is very exciting. Having grown up in Texas and having played high school football here, it's great to come home to work for The University in the state.

"Texas is the type of place where the skies the limit on what you can accomplish. They have great resources, a tremendous fan base and compete for championships. The level of expectations are extremely high and that's something I definitely will embrace."

Kansas coach Turner Gill also wished Wyatt well.
"We appreciate everything Darrell has done for Kansas football," Gill said. "He is an outstanding coach. This is an opportunity for him to get closer to his family and his wife’s family. We hope the best for the entire Wyatt family."


The Longhorns can now cross one of their five offseason coaching vacancies off the list. Wyatt fills the hole at receivers coach, but Texas is still without offensive and defensive coordinators, as well as an offensive line coach and defensive tackles coach and special teams coordinator. Brown said previously that he didn't plan to fill the rest of the vacancies until after the bowl season.

New Kansas staff will earn 16.61% more than previous staff

February, 5, 2010
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The eight members of Turner Gill's new coaching staff at Kansas will earn significantly more than Mark Mangino's 2009 staff did.

The Lawrence Journal-World reports that Gill's staff will earn $2,059,999.96 this season. That figure is up 16.61 percent from the $1.766,500 that Mangino's staff pocketed for their work last season.

Here's a look at Gill's staff and what it will make.
  • Chuck Long, offensive coordinator: $350,000
  • Carl Torbush, defensive coordinator: $350,000
  • John Grimes, offensive line coach: $250,000
  • Darrell Wyatt, wide receivers coach: $249,999.96
  • Reggie Mitchell, running backs coach/recruiting coordinator: $240,000
  • Buddy Wyatt, defensive line coach: $200,000
  • Vic Shealy, cornerbacks coach: $150,000
  • Aaron Stamm, tight ends coach/special teams coordinator: $150,000
  • Robert Wimberly Jr., safeties coach: $120,000

On Mangino's 2009 staff, former offensive coordinator Ed Warinner was the highest-paid member at $300,000, while defensive coordinator Clint Bowen's base salary of $260,000 was second. None of the members of the old staff were carried over by Gill onto his new staff.

Much has been made about Gill's experienced staff, which will feature former FBS head coaches in Long and Torbush and a couple of the nation's top recruiters in Wyatt and Mitchell. It's obvious that Kansas isn't paying lip service to the cost of assembling a top staff when these salaries are analyzed.

And Gill's starting salary of $2 million per year on a five-year contract is the highest salary that Kansas has ever started a football coach when he begins his work with the Jayhawks.

Gill announces new Kansas coaching staff

January, 5, 2010
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New Kansas football coach Turner Gill has finished the hiring of his coaching staff with the announcement of six new coaches.

Joining Gill’s staff are offensive line coach J.B. Grimes, running backs coach/recruiting coordinator Reggie Mitchell, cornerbacks coach Vic Shealy, safeties coach Robert Wimberly, defensive line coach Buddy Wyatt and co-offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach Darrell Wyatt.

Mitchell and Darrell Wyatt both coached previously at Kansas.

Gill previously had hired co-offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Chuck Long, defensive coordinator Carl Torbush and tight ends/special teams coordinator Aaron Stamm.

Considering the circumstances of throwing the staff together quickly, Gill did an admirable job in cobbling together a respected staff that is loaded with recruiting ties throughout the Big 12 area.

The 10 full-time staff members, including Gill, have combined to coach 213 seasons and 72 bowl games at the collegiate level. Four members of the staff -- Long, Torbush, Gill and Shealy -- have spent a combined 15 years as a college head coach.

Wyatt reportedly headed back to KU coaching position

December, 24, 2009
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Several Kansas newspapers are reporting that Southern Mississippi offensive coordinator Darrell Wyatt is set to join Turner Gill's staff at Kansas as a new receivers coach.

Wyatt coached at Kansas from 1997-2000 on Terry Allen's staff before leaving for a position at Oklahoma State. He later coached at Oklahoma where he was credited for developing standout receivers like Mark Clayton and recruiting Adrian Peterson.

His hiring is important as it adds another experienced coach to a staff already dotted with former head coaches like Chuck Long and Carl Torbush.

Wyatt's offense at Southern Mississippi was one of the most prolific in school history. The Golden Eagles ranked 20th nationally in total offense and broke 36 school records. Southern Mississippi finished 7-5 in 2009, losing to Middle Tennessee State in the New Orleans Bowl.

Wyatt also adds another experienced recruiter in the Big 12 area to Kansas.

Gill mentioned recruiting four times among his top seven priorities last week when he was hired. So it's understandable that Wyatt fits that profile exactly, as well as bringing him an experienced coach who has helped develop a prolific offense in recent seasons.

Gill's staff is expected to be completed early next week, the Kansas City Star reported.

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