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Big Ten Wednesday mailbag

8/20/2014

No surprise, but one topic has dominated the conversation in the Big Ten -- and predictably generated the most questions in the mailbag. But Braxton Miller's shoulder injury isn't the only thing worth discussion in the league, particularly with training camps winding down and everybody making the final push ahead of the season openers.

Austin Ward: There's no doubt Ohio State could be facing one of the more interesting quarterback situations in recent memory if Miller completely heals and sticks with his pronounced intentions of returning after a redshirt season. First things first, J.T. Barrett (or Cardale Jones) will have plenty to do to prove they are capable of replacing the void left by a two-time Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year. But I don't think the Buckeyes will look at it as putting off the future for another year as much as embracing the window to win a championship and making the most of it that year. A fully healthy Miller is among the most valuable players in college football, and if he elects to return, he would be playing behind a veteran offensive line, handing off to a deep, experienced group of tailbacks and throwing to a crop of receivers that have been among coach Urban Meyer's top priorities in recruiting -- with what could be a nasty defense on the other side of the ball for Ohio State. Titles are hard to win, and it's difficult at this point to envision any scenario where the Buckeyes wouldn't want Miller to chase it.

Austin Ward: There is an element of truth to that, but Ohio State was already trying to shift Miller away from carrying the entire load for the offense and becoming more of a distributor heading into his senior season. Now the Buckeyes just figure to be installing a guy for whom that sort of role comes more naturally. Miller was supposed to be more dangerous this season because of all those weapons around him, and while his ability to elude pressure and scramble for extra yards is invaluable, Barrett may not need to do that as often if he gets the ball out as quickly as the coaching staff has indicated he can. He'll also have the benefit of all that added talent at the skill positions, which could put him in great position to hit the ground running leading the attack for the Buckeyes.

Austin Ward: Hey, why not three? Typically, I still lean toward the school of thought that rolling with one quarterback is the way to go, but there are always exceptions. As Florida proved under Urban Meyer with Chris Leak and Tim Tebow, if the two guys provide different sets of skills and don't let ego get in the way, that approach can work. I don't doubt at all that a former Meyer assistant would be aware of the potential benefits and have an idea how to manage the rotation, and Joel Stave and Tanner McEvoy each do bring something unique to the table for the Badgers. If the two of them are truly as neck-and-neck as it has often sounded, I don't think it's a stretch to see a rotation working at Wisconsin -- particularly since either guy will have Melvin Gordon and Corey Clement around to make their lives easier.

Austin Ward: As long as Mark Dantonio and Pat Narduzzi are around, it's safe to assume the Spartans will continue to make the defense their top emphasis. They proved a year ago that the scheme, attitude and work ethic of the Michigan State program is more valuable than the individual talent, and there's no reason to think that won't continue even as they replace some valuable veteran contributors. However, it won't hurt them at all to have a more dangerous offense to complement that unit, and it's reasonable to expect big strides will be made now that Connor Cook has nearly a full season of experience and an entire offseason as the No. 1 guy at quarterback under his belt. If already proven running back Jeremy Langford and Michigan State's group of receivers can make similar strides as Cook did even just within last season, the Spartans might start being known as a team that can hurt opponents offensively -- while still wreaking havoc with their defense.