Bolser taking lead for revamped Hoosiers

July, 16, 2012
7/16/12
2:30
PM ET
One characteristic many seek in a leader is the ability to speak candidly about past failures.

Indiana tight end Ted Bolser has this covered pretty well.

[+] EnlargeIndiana Hoosiers tight end Ted Bolser
Cal Sport Media via AP ImagesIndiana Hoosiers tight end Ted Bolser is hoping to catch 50 passes in a revamped offense.
Bolser doesn't hold back when assessing what went wrong in 2011 -- when Indiana finished 1-11 and went winless in the Big Ten and against FBS competition -- and what's going right these days in Bloomington.

"I'd like to say we trimmed the fat off our team last year, got rid of a lot of guys who didn't want to be here," Bolser told ESPN.com. "Everybody here wants to play, and plans on starting, so there's a lot of competition going on. We need competition to win. That's what we didn't have in the past. People just gave up their roles."

Such a passive attitude -- or a disinterested one -- played into the Hoosiers losing so many games.

"It was a huge distraction," Bolser said. "Not only during game day did some people just not care, but weekends, after hours, [when] coaches weren't around. ... We didn't have much leadership last year. Everybody was just kind of wandering in their own heads. The leadership's really changed this year."

Bolser is part of a small but vocal group stepping forward. Indiana enters 2012 with only eight seniors on the roster -- seven fifth-year players and one true senior (defensive tackle Adam Replogle). Given the small number, Bolser and other fourth-year juniors are taking bigger leadership roles, as are younger players.

He mentioned center Will Matte, linebackers Jacarri Alexander and David Cooper and quarterback Tre Roberson as players taking steps as leaders. Although Roberson is a true sophomore, "we’re treating him like he's a senior," Bolser said.

"With the few upperclassmen we have, just about all of us are having our own leadership role," Bolser continued. "For myself, I've noticed a tremendous leap."

Part of that leap is personal accountability, and Bolser is setting the bar high in 2012. He recorded 27 receptions for 407 yards and five touchdowns as a redshirt freshman in 2010, making seven starts. But his numbers dipped in all four categories last season -- 14 catches, 165 receiving yards, one touchdown, six starts. To be fair the decline largely can be attributed to a run-based offense led by a freshman quarterback.

Head coach Kevin Wilson wants to emphasize the pass much more this season and brought in a new offensive coordinator, Seth Littrell, who comes from the Mike Leach coaching tree and oversaw an Arizona offense that ranked third nationally in passing a year ago (370.8 ypg).

"This year, we're throwing the ball no matter what," Bolser said. "For myself and the wide receivers, we're expecting big things."

How big?

"I'm expecting better numbers than I had my freshman year by far," he said. "I had around 30 catches my freshman year, and I'm hoping to get around 50 plus this year. I'm hoping to be in the game just about every play, blocking or catching passes. As much as we're going to be throwing it, the ball has to go to somebody, and I'm hoping it goes to me."

Arguably no Indiana could benefit more from Littrell's arrival than Bolser. Littrell, who will directly coach tight ends and fullbacks at IU, worked at Arizona with Rob Gronkowski, who Bolser calls "just about every tight end's idol."

"Especially when I'm watching film, we go over what [Gronkowski] does and previous things he's done, how their relationship blossomed, how they worked with each other and a lot of things like that," Bolser said. "Things are changing, especially lately. You've got to be a block- and pass-oriented tight end. You've got to have both, which he has."

Bolser hopes to be the complete package for Indiana this year -- minus The Gronk Spike.

Said Bolser: "I can't do that."

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