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Wednesday, January 19, 2011
Big Ten recruiting update

By ESPN.com staff
ESPN.com

Many of you have asked for recruiting news as signing day approaches, and today you get your wish.

(Note: While I'll do my best to post recruiting updates in this space, my time is limited and you'll get much more comprehensive coverage from ESPN's staff of recruiting reporters and analysts. Bookmark their page and thank me later).

CLASS RANKINGS

ESPN Recruiting has issued its updated class rankings, and only two Big Ten teams appear in the top 25. Ohio State drops one spot to No. 7 but still boasts an excellent class led by quarterback Braxton Miller, defensive end Steve Miller and cornerback Doran Grant.

Nebraska drops two spots to No. 14, but the Huskers will bring in an impressive haul that includes running back Aaron Green, center Ryne Reeves and quarterback Bubba Starling (if he doesn't go play baseball).

Is it a concern that only two Big Ten classes are ranked? Maybe, but Michigan is in a transition phase, Penn State is bringing in a small class and while Iowa, Michigan State and Wisconsin all might not be in the top 25, their classes can't be too far outside the rankings. All three teams are bringing in some good prospects this season.

ESPNU 150

Here's the updated ESPNU 150 player rankings. Nebraska's Green is the Big Ten's highest-rated recruit, coming in at No. 11 nationally.

Other Big Ten recruits listed include:

No. 30: DE Steve Miller, Ohio State
No. 51: ATH Jamal Turner, Nebraska
No. 54: G Angelo Mangiro, Penn State
No. 69: CB Doran Grant, Ohio State
No. 75: LB Ryan Shazier, Ohio State
No. 81: QB Braxton Miller, Ohio State
No. 106: WR Evan Spencer, Ohio State
No. 108: WR Christian Jones, Northwestern
No. 109: CB Charles Jackson, Nebraska
No. 115: QB Bubba Starling, Nebraska
No. 127: G Michael Bennett, Ohio State
No. 132: ATH Bill Belton, Penn State
No. 150: LB Lawrence Thomas, Michigan State

Also check out Jamie Newberg's look at where some of the nation's top uncommitted prospects could be headed for college.