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Tuesday, December 17, 2013
Season report card: Indiana

By Brian Bennett

This is the time of year where players are preparing for or finishing up their final exams before moving on to bowl season or going home.

In that spirit, we're passing out our own final grades for the regular season for each Big Ten team's offense, defense, special teams and overall.

First to get the red-pen treatment: the Indiana Hoosiers.

Offense: A-minus

In many ways, the Hoosiers developed into an elite offensive unit in 2013. They finished second in the Big Ten in scoring at 38.4 points per game and in total offense at 508.5 yards per game. They led the league in passing for a second straight year and made great strides in the rushing game, averaging more than 200 yards per contest. Indiana scored at least 35 points eight times.

Tevin Coleman would have rushed for more than 1,000 yards if not for a late-season injury. He still went for 958 yards and 12 touchdowns in a breakout year for the sophomore. Indiana had the deepest group of receiving targets in the league, paced by Cody Latimer's 1,096-yard, nine-touchdown season. Though Kevin Wilson juggled quarterbacks Nate Sudfeld and Tre Roberson without any discernible pattern to the layman, both ranked in the top five of the Big Ten in pass efficiency. The offensive line shook off some key injuries to remain solid.

The only drawbacks to an otherwise outstanding season offensively were the unit's disappearance against Wisconsin and Ohio State -- when it scored a combined 17 points in lopsided defeats -- along with its slow start against Navy and sloppy finish against Minnesota in must-win home games.

Defense: F

This was supposed to be the year where the Hoosiers showed some defensive improvement under Wilson and coordinator Doug Mallory after an influx of young talent. Instead, Indiana's defense managed to get worse, allowing more points (38.8), total yards (527.9) and rushing yards (237.8) per game than last year's Big Ten-worst unit. The Hoosiers ranked 120th out of 123 FBS teams in total defense.

Indiana generated very little pass rush and couldn't stop any half-decent rushing attack. The low point came against Michigan, when the Wolverines scored 63 points and put up 751 yards, 503 of those coming through the air. The Hoosiers also never forced Navy to punt in that crippling home loss.

Wilson once again played several freshmen on defense, including T.J. Simmons, Antonio Allen, Clyde Newton, Ralphael Green and Darius Latham, but the results only got worse. The program simply can't expect to compete for anything worthwhile until the defense makes drastic improvements.

Special teams: B-minus

Indiana led the league in kickoff coverage, was second in the Big Ten in punt return average and was mediocre on kickoff returns. The Hoosiers ranked second to last in net punting. Mitch Ewald remained a reliable kicker, making nine-of-11 field goal tries and all 56 extra points.

Overall: D-plus

The Hoosiers were rarely boring and did manage to increase their win total by one over 2012 while upsetting Penn State and beating rival Purdue. But hopes were very high for a bowl game in 2013, and with eight home games and one of the most explosive offenses in the country, that should have happened. Indiana was good enough to blow out the Nittany Lions and a good Bowling Green club but put itself in too big of a hole by losing to Navy and Minnesota at home. The defense had no business being that bad in Wilson's third year. Ultimately, that's what is holding this program back and what keeps us from giving the Hoosiers' season a better grade.