Big Ten: Kenny Bell

B1G fantasy draft: round-by-round analysis

August, 28, 2014
Aug 28
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Big Ten football kicks off in just a few hours. So you know what that means – the start of tailgates, packed stadiums and unforgettable upsets. And, of course, the start of another season of our Big Ten fantasy league.

The Trombone Shorties (Adam Rittenberg) and the team formerly known as The One Who Knocks (Brian Bennett) won’t have it easy anymore. The Big Ten fantasy league is no longer just a head-to-head battle. Now, in Year 4 of the league, there are five of us – and the competition and trash talk are intense. (If you want to play college fantasy football, too, you can do so through ESPN’s College Football Challenge.)

We held a live eight-round draft earlier this week, and below you’ll find our draft results – along with a brief analysis by Josh Moyer on each round:

 

Round 1: The No. 2 overall pick is the trickiest in this draft. Melvin Gordon is the easy No. 1 – but where do you go from there? On one hand, running back is deep, but the top four at the position could be gone when the pick comes around again. Rittenberg opted to play it safe by picking Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah, widely regarded as the second-best offensive player in the B1G. But he might come to regret the pick if Abdullah can’t find the end zone more often. Abdullah averaged 19.8 fantasy points a game last season, which was behind Tevin Coleman (20.79 points) and just slightly ahead of Jeremy Langford (19.42 points), who really took off in Game 6. … Quarterbacks and wideouts were at a premium, so Ward and Bennett focused on quarterback in the first round. There are no point deductions for turnovers, so the Devin Gardner pick was a smart one.

[+] EnlargeGordon
Scott Halleran/Getty ImagesWisconsin's Melvin Gordon was an easy pick as the No. 1 player in the Big Ten blog's fantasy draft.
Round 2: Let the run on wide receivers begin. If teams didn’t spend one of their first two picks on the position, then it was basically impossible to get an elite player. Rittenberg struck first with Devin Funchess, stealing my pick. I “settled” on Indiana’s Shane Wynn. … Everyone knew Bennett’s pick before he made it, but it was another great one with Coleman. Bennett probably had the best first two rounds out of any of us. … Ward’s pick of Josh Ferguson in the second round was mildly surprising since we don’t get a point per reception, but the running back picture was more muddled after the first four went off the board.

Round 3: I started off the third round with Stefon Diggs – giving me the top overall receiver combo with Wynn-Diggs – but definitely guaranteeing I’ll be in a hole later when it comes to quarterback. Rittenberg didn’t want the same to happen so he opted to take his first quarterback in Connor Cook. … This is when the draft started getting interesting. Sherman took Maryland’s Deon Long as the fourth overall receiver. It could certainly pay off in the end, but it certainly wasn’t a “safe” pick with Diggs as Maryland's top target and with proven commodities such as Ohio State’s Devin Smith still on the board. … Poor Bennett got the short end of the stick when he tried to draft Illinois’ Wes Lunt – but he wasn’t in ESPN’s draft database for some reason. So we decided as a group to exclude him; Bennett took Maryland’s C.J. Brown instead. A fantasy downgrade for sure.

Round 4: Maybe someone should’ve sent Sherman a memo on Penn State’s offensive line because he took Zach Zwinak over some other prime options. But Sherman’s banking on the goal-line value of Zwinak, who scored 12 TDs last season. Zwinak could be like fantasy football’s 2004 version of Jerome Bettis. … With few receivers left, Smith was a solid pick by Ward and definitely his best value of the draft so far.

Round 5: I took my first quarterback in Iowa’s Jake Rudock, as I’m banking on some extra value thanks to his penchant for running close to the goal line. (He had five rush TDs last season.) But, in retrospect, that might not have been the best move. Ward got another good value pick in Ohio State QB J.T. Barrett – and, while Rudock is the safer pick, Barrett certainly has the higher ceiling. Part of me is regretting my choice already. … Bennett’s great draft continued by grabbing the best remaining receiver in Kenny Bell. If he can meet his 2012 touchdown production (8), this could be the best-value receiver pick of the draft. … Rittenberg also made a good move with Rutgers’ running back Paul James, who has a few early games against bad defenses. If he falters when the schedule gets harder, there’s always the waiver wire.

Round 6: Flag on the play, Sherman! The Sherman Tanks initially tried to draft Ohio State’s Dontre Wilson, a hybrid back, as a receiver – but ESPN’s database listed him only as a running back. So Sherman had to pick again and chose Iowa’s Kevonte-Martin Manley. … Ward was not happy with the remaining receiver selection at all. It showed in his pick; Penn State’s Geno Lewis could be third in receiving on Penn State by the time the season ends. … Rittenberg made an interesting move by picking Minnesota’s defense first, over Michigan State’s defense. His reasoning was solid, though. MSU plays Oregon in Week 2 and then has a bye. So he didn’t want to work the waiver wire that early. Me? I took the Spartans’ D with the next pick, and I’ll ride it out.

Rounds 7-8: It was mostly all kickers and defenses in the final two rounds. Rittenberg took Penn State tight end Jesse James to fill his last receiver spot in the sixth round, and it was a good pick for being the 10th receiver/tight end taken. James is 6-foot-7 and could be a nice red-zone target for Christian Hackenberg this season. … The only other non-defense/kicker came from me. I needed a quarterback, so this year’s Mr. Irrelevant is Minnesota’s Mitch Leidner. Quarterback is definitely my weakness. But I don’t care if Leidner throws 40 percent -- as long he scores a rushing TD every game.

Planning for success: Big Ten

August, 26, 2014
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LINCOLN, Neb. -- When Tommy Armstrong Jr. took over the job as starting quarterback four games into last season, his Nebraska teammates found him in quiet moments and offered encouragement.

You were made for this, they told him. We wouldn't want anyone else back there.

As Armstrong, now a 20-year-old sophomore, prepares to start on Saturday at home against Florida Atlantic, the roles have reversed after an offseason of transformation for the quarterback.

"He talks more," senior I-back Ameer Abdullah said. "He talks a lot now. He actually talks too much."

Armstrong went 7-1 as a starter last season. Still, his inexperience showed. Backup Ron Kellogg III saved Armstrong with a Hail Mary to beat Northwestern and replaced him early in Nebraska's win at Penn State. Armstrong struggled to find consistency, completing 51.9 percent of his passes with nine touchdowns and eight interceptions.

But he created a foundation. Over the past eight months, Armstrong has continued to build upon a solid finish to his rookie year -- a Gator Bowl victory over Georgia -- by developing into a trusted leader of the Nebraska offense, according to coaches and teammates.

"Being the leader on the team," Armstrong said, "you have to be able to talk to your teammates just like they expect you to."

So when Armstrong strays from the correct path, he said, he expects Abdullah or senior left guard Jake Cotton or receiver Kenny Bell to set him straight. And when one of them needs help, Armstrong won't hesitate to speak up.

"At the end of the day, we are all family," he said, "and we are all teammates. If one person is down and out, everybody is going to be the same way. You just have go out there and do your job."

Armstrong's plan for 2014 success involved eliminating the domino effect of mistakes. As a freshman, he said, an error often led to others.

His top area of improvement this month in preseason camp? Moving the chains, he said. He's more likely to find the open man on a short route when he would have misfired downfield last year.

Teammates have noticed.

"I'm really proud of the kid," Cotton said. "He's come a long way."

Abdullah, a senior and the nation's top returning rusher, chides Armstrong jokingly for his more vocal presence. Really, Abdullah likes the quarterback's maturity. Abdullah said the offseason work has paid off nicely.

"He understand the plays much better, so he throws to where his windows," Abdullah said. "He's much quicker. He understands where people are going to be, which coverages to play away from, and he's hitting lanes much quicker, which is really critical as a quarterback in this offense."

All the talk means little before Saturday, said Armstrong, who has dropped about 10 pounds from last season to a playing weight of 215 and feels stronger.

"I am expected to do what I have been doing all spring and fall," he said. "And that is to put these guys in the right position to win some football games."

Preseason All-Big Ten team

August, 21, 2014
Aug 21
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There is no official preseason all-conference team in the Big Ten (or official predicted order of finish, etc.). But we here at ESPN.com have got you covered with our preseason all-league picks on offense, defense and special teams.

And here they are:

Offense

QB: Connor Cook, Michigan State: Braxton Miller's injury opened up this spot on the first team. Penn State's Christian Hackenberg and Indiana's Nate Sudfeld were potential choices here too, but Cook's Big Ten title game and Rose Bowl MVP finish earn him the nod.

RB: Melvin Gordon, Wisconsin: Well, sure. He could lead the nation in rushing, unless ...

RB: Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska: ... Abdullah, his good friend, beats him to it. In a league blessed with great running backs, these two stand out the most.

WR: Stefon Diggs, Maryland: There is a lot of uncertainty in the Big Ten at receiver heading into 2014. This much is certain: If Diggs can stay healthy, he'll be one of the nation's best.

WR: Shane Wynn, Indiana: Wynn scored more touchdowns than any other Big Ten receiver the past season, and now he steps into a more featured role.

TE: Devin Funchess, Michigan: Funchess might play wide receiver almost exclusively, in which case this should be viewed as a third wide receiver spot on the team. The matchup nightmare looks poised for a big season.

OT: Brandon Scherff, Iowa: He might just be the best left tackle in college football in 2014. He's definitely got NFL scouts drooling.

OT: Rob Havenstein, Wisconsin: An enormous road grader at right tackle. Trying to shed him and catch Melvin Gordon is just not fair.

OG: Kaleb Johnson, Rutgers: He thought about leaving for the NFL after the past season but instead gave the Scarlet Knights a boost by returning. He has started 37 straight games.

OG: Kyle Costigan, Wisconsin: He could be the next rising star in Wisconsin's offensive lineman factory.

C: Jack Allen, Michigan State: A second-team All-Big Ten pick the past season, the former high school wrestling champion has no let up in his game.

Defense

DE: Shilique Calhoun, Michigan State: He’s the returning Big Ten defensive lineman of the year and could become the conference’s defensive player of the year in 2014, unless ...

DE: Randy Gregory, Nebraska: ... Gregory edges him out for the honor. The pass-rush specialist outpaced Calhoun in sacks (10.5) the past season, and Bo Pelini said Gregory has “only scratched the surface of what he’s going to be down the line.”

DT: Michael Bennett, Ohio State: He anchors the best defensive line in the conference and was named to the All-Big Ten’s second team last season.

DT: Carl Davis, Iowa: He still thinks Scherff would get the best of him if they squared off, but Athlon thought highly enough of Davis to make him a fourth-team preseason All-American.

LB: Chi Chi Ariguzo, Northwestern: The quiet Ariguzo likes to let his play do the talking, and it chatted up a storm this past season -- to the tune of 106 tackles and four interceptions.

LB: Mike Hull, Penn State: He was a coin-flip from transferring to Pittsburgh during the sanctions, but now he’s the leader of this revamped defense.

LB: Jake Ryan, Michigan: Ryan shocked onlookers last season by taking less than seven months to go from ACL surgery to playing in a Big Ten game. Hopes are higher now for the healthy redshirt senior, as he has registered a stop in the backfield in 25 of his past 30 games.

CB: Trae Waynes, Michigan State: He’s taking over at Darqueze Dennard's boundary cornerback position, but he’s up for the challenge. He’s already on the watch lists for the Bednarik and Thorpe awards.

CB: Blake Countess, Michigan: He tied for the Big Ten lead in interceptions (6) the past season -- despite battling lower abdominal pain most of the year.

S: Kurtis Drummond, Michigan State: The blue-collar DB started 21 straight games and was a Sports Illustrated All-American the past season.

S: Ibraheim Campbell, Northwestern: A smart and instinctive player, Campbell has been remarkably consistent for the Wildcats. He’s a three-time all-academic B1G player and has eight career interceptions.

Special teams

K: Michael Geiger, Michigan State: As a freshman in 2013, he made 15 of his 16 field-goal attempts.

P: Mike Sadler, Michigan State: An ESPN.com All-American in 2013, Sadler combines with Geiger to give the Spartans the best 1-2 kicking tandem in the league.

KR: Kenny Bell, Nebraska: He led the Big Ten in return yardage the past season (averaging 26.5 yards per kick) and took one 99 yards for a touchdown at Penn State.

PR: Kevonte Martin-Manley, Iowa: He averaged 15.7 yards per return in 2013 and scored on two punt returns in the same game.

Selections by school:

Michigan State: 7
Iowa: 3
Michigan: 3
Nebraska: 3
Wisconsin: 3
Northwestern: 2
Indiana: 1
Maryland: 1
Ohio State: 1
Penn State: 1
Rutgers: 1
Illinois: 0
Minnesota: 0
Purdue: 0

Big Ten morning links

August, 18, 2014
Aug 18
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Actual college football returns next week. Huzzah.

And players are likely celebrating as well, because training camps are winding to a close. Depth charts are also shaping up as well as teams move nearer toward preparing for Week 1. But some key jostling for jobs remains. Let's take inventory of a few of the more interesting position battles left in the Big Ten:
  • Wisconsin quarterback: By most accounts, incumbent starter Joel Stave has looked like the better option over Tanner McEvoy so far this month. At this point, I'd be surprised if Gary Andersen started McEvoy over the far more experienced Stave in the opener against LSU, though McEvoy could see some time in special packages. The Badgers have practiced some option, and that just doesn't seem like Stave's cup of tea, now does it? Where some battles stand for the Badgers.
  • Illinois quarterback: Tim Beckman has said he could name a starter on Wednesday. Most everyone expects it to be Oklahoma State transfer Wes Lunt. A big question, in my mind, is how the Illini can best use Aaron Bailey's talents.
  • Michigan State linebacker: Replacing Max Bullough and Denicos Allen isn't cut and dry, but it's not because of a lack of options. Riley Bullough and Jon Reschke are coming on strong and pushing Taiwan Jones and Darien Harris for playing time. Mark Dantonio described the situation on Saturday as "sort of a linebacker group by committee right now."
  • Iowa cornerback: It's a three-man scrum between Maurice Fleming, Sean Draper and Greg Mabin to see who starts opposite Desmond King. Mabin might have been set back by a minor injury. But Kirk Ferentz said the position is "up for grabs right now." Ferentz still has a lot of questions to answer.
  • Ohio State left guard: Darryl Baldwin seized the right tackle job, but there's far less clarity at left guard, a position that Urban Meyer has said concerns him. Doug Lesmerises breaks down the fight for playing time there and elsewhere on the Buckeyes.

Another major position battle should be cleared up on Monday, when Purdue is expected to name its starting quarterback. But that's one where Danny Etling has been a big front-runner all along.

On to the links:

Weekend scrimmages

1. Jabrill Peppers is going to play a lot, the offensive line still needs work and other observations from Nick Baumgardner on Michigan's open scrimmage before an estimated 25,000 fans.

2. Rutgers' Saturday scrimmage, dominated by the offense, provided answers to some key questions.

3. Wide receiver Deon Long was one of the stars of Maryland's open scrimmage.

4. Defense won the day at Michigan State's scrimmage.

5. Indiana coach Kevin Wilson sees improved depth on his team after the Hoosiers' latest scrimmage.

6. The running game was the main attraction in Purdue's scrimmage.

7. Northwestern held an open scrimmage, but hardly anyone of note participated.

West Division
East Division
Do you think Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon will match or eclipse last season's rushing total of 1,609 yards? Is Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller capable of another 36-touchdown season?

Have a good feeling about the Big Ten's rushing or passing leader? Well, you will want to grab your wallet and read on.

Bovada has set over-unders on several key Big Ten statistical milestones for the 2014 season.

Let's check 'em out:
  • Miller's total passing yards: 2,095.5 (last season: 2,094 yards)
  • Miller's total rushing yards: 850.5 (last season: 1,068)
  • Miller's total rushing and passing touchdowns: 32.5 (last season: 36)
  • Gordon's total rushing yards: 1,554.5 (last season: 1,609)
  • Gordon's total rushing touchdowns: 14.5 (last season: 12)
  • Stefon Diggs' total receiving yards: 950.5 (last season: 587*)
  • Diggs total receiving touchdowns: 6.5 (last season: 3*)

*Diggs appeared in only seven games last season because of injury

Bovada also sets odds on the Big Ten's top statistical races:

Rushing yards

Gordon: 1/1
Jeremy Langford, Michigan State: 3/1
David Cobb, Minnesota: 13/4
Tevin Coleman, Indiana: 7/2
Ameer Abdullah, Nebraska: 4/1

Rushing touchdowns

Langford: 2/1
Gordon: 9/4
Coleman: 5/2
Abdullah: 11/4
Cobb: 15/4

Receiving yards

Shane Wynn, Indiana: 2/1
Devin Funchess, Michigan: 9/4
Diggs: 5/2
Devin Smith, Ohio State: 3/1
Kenny Bell, Nebraska: 13/4

Receiving touchdowns

Funchess: 7/4
Smith: 9/4
Wynn: 11/4
Diggs: 13/4
Bell: 7/2

It's interesting that Bovada's over-under rushing total for Gordon is lower than his 2013 total -- despite the departure of James White -- though he's still the best bet to lead the Big Ten in rushing. The oddsmakers also see a rushing yards drop-off for Miller, who has eclipsed 1,000 yards in each of the past two seasons.

Abdullah could be a good bet for rushing leader (not touchdowns leader, as Imani Cross takes some away from him), and the receiving yards race looks totally wide open.
video
If the College Football Playoff had been in place for the 2006 season, there’s very little doubt that two Big Ten teams -- Ohio State and Michigan -- would have reached the four-team field. The conference, which finished the year with three Top 10 teams, could have called itself the nation’s best league without anyone snickering.

Fast forward eight years, and everything has changed. The SEC reigns supreme. The Big Ten is the butt of many jokes and, in the eyes of many, ranks fifth among the Power 5 conferences.

"People think the Big Ten is kind of weak," Ohio State defensive tackle Michael Bennett said. "I think we have the whole stigma of, 'The Big Ten can’t win bowl games.'"

[+] EnlargeConnor Cook
Jeff Gross/Getty ImagesTo change the national perception that it is a weak conference, the Big Ten needs more big victories like Michigan State's against Stanford in the Rose Bowl.
To be sure, the league has brought most of this misery upon itself. The Big Ten is 11-21 in bowl games in the past four seasons and has posted a winning postseason record once (in 2010) since 2002. The league has lost 25 of its past 33 games against ranked, power conference competition and Notre Dame. The Big Ten hasn’t played for a national championship since the 2007 season, when Ohio State’s second straight double-digit loss to an SEC team did much to create the SEC-rules, Big-Ten-drools paradigm we’ve been living in ever since.

Yet the perception of the Big Ten’s downturn appears to paint a worse picture than the reality. Even when league teams ascend, they often get dragged down by the court of public opinion. Take last season's Big Ten champs, for instance. Michigan State won all of its league games by double digits and went on to beat Stanford in the Rose Bowl. But the Spartans did not crack the Top 12 in either major poll or the BCS standings until Nov. 24, when they were 10-1.

Last season's Wisconsin Badgers were 9-2 at one point, with their only losses coming on an all-time officiating hose job at eventual Pac-12 division winner Arizona State and at Ohio State. Still, the Badgers had trouble gaining much affection from pollsters. Or how about this season's Iowa club? Despite winning eight games in 2013 and taking LSU to the wire in the Outback Bowl, and despite having what everyone considers a highly advantageous schedule in 2014, the Hawkeyes were ranked No. 33 in the first preseason USA Today coaches’ poll.

"The lack of insight on the Big Ten is an interesting thing," Nebraska receiver Kenny Bell said, "because there are stout players and solid teams in the Big Ten. We beat Georgia [in the Gator Bowl], Iowa had LSU on their skates ... and Sparty went and beat Stanford. We’re steadily coming back into the frame of major college football."

The Big Ten needs to improve both its track record and its perception problem this season, with the first year of the Playoff looming. The nightmare scenario for the league is to see its champion left out of the field because the conference isn’t considered strong enough. There is really only one way to change that.

"You’ve got to win games," Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald said. "One of the positive byproducts of the Playoff is that the preseason doesn’t matter. If you want to get yourself in the Playoff and talk about being the best, it’s going to come down to winning football games and playing a competitive schedule. If you want to change perception, you’ve got to win those games. That’s the bottom line."

The Big Ten has plenty of opportunities to help itself this season, beginning in Week 1 when Wisconsin plays LSU in Houston.

"It’s a new year, and the Big Ten as a whole is trying to make a prominent statement," Badgers running back Melvin Gordon said. "It’ll set a big statement for the Big Ten if we come out and win that game."

Michigan State goes to Oregon in Week 2 in another major showcase opportunity. Others include Nebraska hosting Miami, Ohio State taking on Virginia Tech and Michigan and Northwestern playing at Notre Dame. Schedules will continue to get more difficult in the near future, as league commissioner Jim Delany instructed his teams to play top nonconference competition to impress the selection committee.

"What we've tried to do is structure ... our scheduling to deliver an opportunity for our teams if they're successful," Delany said. "We make no predictions. We make no excuses."

There is hope for the future. Ohio State’s Urban Meyer and Penn State’s James Franklin are former SEC coaches who have brought an aggressive, nationwide approach to recruiting. The Buckeyes are 24-2 the past two seasons yet are just now building the type of roster Meyer envisions. Michigan State joined the elite last season and will try to stay there.

"I see a league that’s improving," Meyer said. "I just see a lot of positive recruiting going on in our conference, a lot of great coaches, and more importantly, a lot of great players. I think people are watching the Big Ten expecting a bunch of improvement going forward."

The conference still must convince others that improvement is for real. The surest sign of that would be to get a team into the inaugural Playoff.

"This is as good a year as any to show the Big Ten is strong and that we’re going to stay strong from here on out," Bennett said. "[But] for us to say that, we have to make it to the Playoff."

Best case/Worst case: Nebraska

August, 12, 2014
Aug 12
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The season is inching closer and closer and, with that, so is our series on the best- and worst-case scenarios for every Big Ten team in 2014.

These aren't predictions or scenarios that are illustrative of the most probable outcomes. They're simply meant to show the potential highs and lows in a season, and any game-by-game breakdowns are more of a means to an end than anything else. Also an important reminder: We're trying to have some fun with these.

Up next are the Nebraska Cornhuskers.

Best case

Bo Pelini raises both arms in triumph on the field in Indianapolis, with the Big Ten trophy in one hand and his cat in the other. Students sing the alma mater while a choked-up Pelini looks on and Anya the cat meows in unison.

“This one’s for Anya!” Pelini screams into the mic.

It’s an image that winds up on the front page of nearly every sports section in the country. “Nearly purr-fect” reads the headline, as the Huskers lock up one of four playoff spots with a 12-1 record. Pelini sweeps Big Ten Coach of the Year honors and is invited to appear on the covers of both Sports Illustrated and Cat Fancy.

Ameer Abdullah rushes for more than 1,700 yards and 14 TDs en route to beating out Braxton Miller for the Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year award. Kenny Bell becomes a first-team All-B1G selection and sets school records for career receptions and receiving yards. Defensive end Randy Gregory is the MVP of the Big Ten championship game, as he wrecks the Buckeyes with 3 1/2 sacks and two forced fumbles in the 31-21 victory.

Early on in the season, some fans wondered aloud if Nebraska would be able to make it this far. The Cornhuskers needed a last-minute touchdown drive by Tommy Armstrong to edge Fresno State in a 38-35 late-night thriller on Sept. 13. And then came the tough, 20-14 loss to Michigan State on Oct. 4.

But Pelini keeps his players motivated with a "Meow (Re)Mix" music video that goes viral, and that Fresno State contest provides a turning point for Armstrong. He looks like a new quarterback, brimming with confidence, after that career-defining drive in which he converts a trio of third downs during the 75-yard TD march. From then on, the words “poise” and “clutch” are constantly used to describe Armstrong. It becomes a running joke; one blog finds that TV commentators have referred to Armstrong as “clutch” a total of 394 times during the season.

Armstrong helps engineer a 10-point comeback over Wisconsin. And, against Iowa, in the last week of the regular season, he shakes off a would-be sack and finds Abdullah in the flat for a short pass that Abdullah turns into a 60-yard score. The Huskers end up winning by a touchdown.

The pass defense is only mediocre, but the front seven strikes fear into conference opponents. And Gregory compiles at least one sack in every game on his way to conference Defensive Player of the Year.

Those highlights replay throughout the minds of Pelini -- and Anya -- as they accept the Big Ten trophy on a cold December night. Next up is the first round of the College Football Playoff.

And, this time around, no one is counting out the Huskers ...

Worst case

In some ways, it’s already begun.

Three potential defensive starters go down in the first week of preseason camp -- safety LeRoy Alexander (suspension), nickelback Charles Jackson (knee injury), linebacker Michael Rose-Ivey (torn ACL) -- but that’s only the tip of the iceberg. Days before the season, the Huskers lose another starting defensive back to injury -- and Abdullah suffers a minor ankle injury that doesn’t keep him out but still seems to hinder him all season.

The Huskers win their first two games without issue, but that streak ends on the road against Fresno State. Armstrong looks lost and commits three turnovers -- two interceptions, one fumble -- as Nebraska loses by two touchdowns. Then comes the loss to Miami (Fla.). That’s when the murmurs start regarding Armstrong.

Pelini is pestered by questions about trying another signal-caller. But, even among fans, there’s no consensus. Some say to go with Johnny Stanton; others think Ryker Fyfe deserves a shot. Some still believe Armstrong is the guy.

Bo stands behind Armstrong and, although Armstrong delivers a win against Illinois, he’s not convincing. Defenses are beginning to creep up on Abdullah, and Nebraska’s star running back seems as if he’s becoming less effective each week. Couple that in with the fact the patchwork secondary hasn’t been tested outside of Fresno State, and some real concerns remain in spite of the 3-2 start.

Then it all starts to unravel against Michigan State. Armstrong is pulled after two first-half interceptions, and Pelini rotates both Stanton and Fyfe. But neither fares any better. With a quarterback controversy brewing, Pelini cuts his news conference short leading up to the game at Northwestern. Then, after another loss, he skips his next one altogether.

Nebraska beats an overmatched Rutgers and Purdue -- but drops the last three to Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa. Abdullah’s rushing average falls by more than a half-yard compared to last season. Bell fails to gain the necessary yardage to break Johnny Rodgers’ career Nebraska record. And the pass defense is ranked outside of the top 75 in the country.

After the final loss in the regular season, dropping Nebraska to 5-7, Pelini walks straight past the waiting sideline reporter into the tunnel. He trudges right past the security guards, skips the postgame presser, hops into his car and drives off.

And nobody is quite sure if he’s coming back …
The dog days of August are here, with two-a-day practices underway at Nebraska.

The Huskers have endured several doses of bad news with injuries and suspensions in the headlines over the past several days. So seniors Ameer Abdullah and Kenny Bell, apparently, want to divert a bit of attention by staging a fun little feud (or so we think) on Twitter.

Abdullah, the star running back, started it on Monday morning by tweeting a photo of Bell’s worn-out cleats in the locker room. Bell, the wideout known for his giant afro hair style, responded quickly.

Bell then upped the ante with a shot of a car on the streets of Lincoln that he said belonged to Abdullah.

We’ll keep an eye on Abdullah and Bell this week at practice to see if their war of words extends to the practice field.

Roundtable: B1G Top 25 players list

August, 1, 2014
Aug 1
10:30
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video

Earlier today, we wrapped up our countdown of the Big Ten's Top 25 players entering the 2014 season. Not surprisingly, Ohio State Buckeyes quarterback Braxton Miller topped the list as he aims for a third consecutive Big Ten offensive player of the year award.

Miller was a fairly easy choice at No. 1, but we debated several other players and where they should end up.

It's roundtable time, and our Big Ten reporter crew is set to break down the Top 25.

Which player did you struggle with the most to rank?

[+] EnlargeDevin Gardner
Rick Osentoski/USA TODAY SportsDevin Gardner's inconsistent play forced him down the Big Ten's top 25 players list.
Adam Rittenberg: Michigan Wolverines quarterback Devin Gardner. He can be really, really good, as we saw last season in games like Notre Dame, Ohio Sate and Indiana. But he also has some moments -- or even entire games -- that leave you scratching your head. He actually didn't appear in my Top 25 because of concerns about his consistency, Michigan's depth at receiver and a struggling offensive line. I can live with him at No. 22 and could certainly see him rise up, but you just don't know what you're going to get week to week.

Brian Bennett: I'm not sure I properly ranked (or in some cases didn't rank) the Maryland Terrapins and Rutgers Scarlet Knights. It's tough because we haven't watched them that closely, while we know the ins and outs of players who competed in the Big Ten the past couple of years. I'm sure Stefon Diggs belongs, and Andre Monroe probably does, too. What about Tyler Kroft or Paul James or Darius Hamilton or Steve Longa or Deon Long? We'll know more about these guys' bona fides after they spend a year in the league.

Mitch Sherman: Venric Mark posed some problems for me. Coming back from a broken ankle that ruined his 2013 season, the Northwestern Wildcats running back is something of a forgotten man, especially amid an outstanding group of league backs. But Mark rushed for nearly 1,400 yards in 2012 and would have likely earned a spot higher than I gave him -- No. 16; 15th in the composite vote -- a year ago.

Which player(s) do you see making the biggest moves up the list for the postseason rankings?

Austin Ward: Now that he's the last one standing with the Indiana Hoosiers, quarterback Nate Sudfeld won't have to worry about sharing snaps or practice reps, and his numbers could skyrocket in that high-octane offense. Fairly or unfairly, though, if the defense doesn't lend a bigger hand to help earn Sudfeld some credit as a winner, he might not be able to climb all that much higher than No. 23.

Rittenberg: Two defensive players suiting up in the Mitten State jump out in Michigan linebacker Jake Ryan (No. 20) and Michigan State Spartans cornerback Trae Waynes (No. 19). Ryan showed in 2012 just how good he can be when healthy, recording four forced fumbles and 16 tackles for loss. Coaches around the Big Ten love Waynes, who steps into the top cover corner role with Darqueze Dennard departing. I also love Tevin Coleman's potential and could see the Indiana running back in our postseason top 10.

[+] EnlargeNate Sudfeld
AP Photo/Doug McSchoolerNate Sudfeld's stock should rise as he leads Indiana's offense this season.
Bennett: I admittedly like Gardner the most and ranked him higher than everyone else. Yes, he forces things at times. But he's also incredibly tough, and he got zero help from the running game last season. If Doug Nussmeier can improve the ground game and patch together a decent offensive line, Gardner could finish as a top 10 player.

What does the Top 25 say about certain positions in the league?

Sherman: We probably overvalue quarterbacks. It's the most important position in football, yes, but I doubt five actually rate among the league’s top 23 players. Interestingly, with the quarterbacks and five running backs, we've still got just 13 offensive players in the top 25. Clearly, it's a strong year for Big Ten defensive ends. By December, at least one of those pass-rushers will belong among the league’s best four players.

Bennett: Defensive end is stacked. Nebraska Cornhuskers' Randy Gregory, MSU's Shilique Calhoun and Ohio State's Joey Bosa are studs, and the Minnesota Golden Gophers' Theiren Cockran and Ohio State's Noah Spence are also special. Also, where are all the offensive linemen in a league known for them? Other than Brandon Scherff, star tackles, guards and centers are MIA.

Ward: Playing quarterback might not be all that fun this season. Ohio State's defensive line might be among the best in the nation, but that's not the only team that will be able to generate a ferocious pass rush. There are seven defensive linemen listed in the preseason top 25, and there could easily have been a few more.

Who were the biggest snubs, either in ranking or those who didn't even make the Top 25?

Sherman: I'll go with two guys who didn't make the list -- Nebraska receiver Kenny Bell, on track to rewrite the school records at his position, and Rutgers' Longa, who collected 123 tackles as a redshirt freshman last year. If Longa played at an established league school, he would have made the Top 25. I voted Bell at No. 23, by the way, and Longa at No. 24.

Rittenberg: I ranked Illinois running back Josh Ferguson in my list and would have liked to see him in the group. He's incredibly versatile -- 50 receptions last season -- and explosive with the ball in his hands. I really like Waynes and think Minnesota defensive end Theiren Cockran could have been higher than No. 21.

Ward: Calling Doran Grant a snub might be a stretch coming off a season with three interceptions for Ohio State’s anemic pass defense, but I think the senior’s talent is overlooked and he’s primed for a breakout in the new system co-defensive coordinator Chris Ash has installed. Playing more aggressively with bump-and-run coverage suits Grant’s athleticism, and by the end of the year, I expect he'll be recognized among the Big Ten's best.

Bennett: Indiana receiver Shane Wynn scored more touchdowns than any other Big Ten player last season, and now he's the top option in the Hoosiers' high-octane passing attack. Fellow players pointed to Wynn as one of the league's best playmakers during media days, yet he didn't get his due here.

B1G media days: Best of Day 1

July, 28, 2014
Jul 28
6:00
PM ET
CHICAGO -- The season has unofficially started in the Big Ten.

Coaches are talking about the importance of taking it one game at a time while chasing a conference title. Players have busted out their finest suits and are raving about how difficult the offseason conditioning program was at their schools. And the media grabbed some free food between interviews.

There is one more day to go before the circus leaves Chicago, but before we get to that, the Big Ten blog is handing out some awards to put a bow on the opening day.

Best-dressed player: Michigan State safety Kurtis Drummond. The honors could just as easily have gone to teammates Shilique Calhoun or Connor Cook, the former for his bow tie and the latter for his accessorizing with his enormous championship ring. But Drummond stole the show as the sharpest of the Spartans, who clearly looked the part of returning conference champs.

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Most fun-loving players: The bright spotlight and huge crowd around him might have kept Ohio State coach Urban Meyer a bit guarded, but his players certainly welcomed the attention and weren't afraid of being playful with the media. Tight end Jeff Heuerman loosened things up by locking quarterback Braxton Miller in a headlock, and after that, both decided to moonlight as media members by sneaking over to ask Meyer a few questions toward the end of a session -- a rare glimpse at the personalities off the field of two of the league's best talents on it.

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Biggest missed opportunity: The Wisconsin-LSU matchup to open the season is appealing enough at a neutral site. But the Badgers and Tigers could have taken the intrigue to another level by hosting those games at two of the loudest, most hostile stadiums in the country -- if only Gary Andersen had been around a couple of years earlier. The Badgers' coach said he "would have said yes" to a home-and-home series at Camp Randall and in Death Valley, a tantalizing what-might-have-been if the Tigers might have been as willing as Andersen.

Most appropriate Twitter handle: Nebraska’s Kenny Bell (@AFRO_THUNDER80). The 6-foot-1 receiver was probably the easiest player to pick out of a crowd, as his puffy afro towered over opposing players. Bell’s play didn’t earn him an award last season -- he was honorable mention on the All-Big Ten team -- but we just couldn’t go one more day without recognizing that 'fro.

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Best-dressed coach: Penn State’s James Franklin. Every day, the head coach spends 22 minutes to shave his head in every direction and trim that goatee ... so it seems slightly surprising that he is probably the coach who spends the most time on his head, considering he’s bald. But, hey, it takes time to pull that look off -- and he was also looking dapper with that Penn State lapel, blue tie and matching pocket square. Franklin often jokes that he doesn’t need to sleep, so maybe he uses some of that extra time to pick out the right clothes.

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Quote of the day: Penn State linebacker Mike Hull has learned under three head coaches -- Joe Paterno, Bill O'Brien and Franklin -- during his career, and their personalities really couldn’t have been any different. Hull laughed while providing their takes on social media as an example.

“Yeah, I’ve seen the whole evolution,” he said. “Joe didn’t know what Facebook was, O’Brien called Facebook ‘Spacebook’ and, now, Coach Franklin probably has every social media there is to have. It’s crazy.”

Most Big Ten quote: “How are you going to approach the Rose Bowl?” -- Michigan coach Brady Hoke, lamenting some aspects of the College Football Playoff in years, like this season, when the Granddaddy of Them All is to serve as a national semifinal game. Hoke suggested that some of the pageantry associated with the game -- for instance, the Beef Bowl team competition at Lawry’s, a prime rib restaurant in Beverly Hills -- will be eliminated because of the high stakes and need for a regular game-week regimen. Of the traditional Rose Bowl, Hoke added: “It’s the greatest experience in America for kids.”

Most Iowa quote (maybe ever): “Sometimes, old school is a good school.” -- Hawkeyes coach Kirk Ferentz on his program’s resistance to some of the offensive innovation that has swept college football.

Best quote about a player not in attendance: “I don’t like standing too close to him because it seems like the wind is always blowing through his hair. When he smiles, this little thing comes off his tooth like in the toothpaste commercial.” -- Penn State coach James Franklin on sophomore quarterback Christian Hackenberg.
You've probably figured out that Big Ten media days are coming, as we've been previewing them extensively. As a reminder, we will be taking Twitter questions for all 12 coaches as well as the following players: Nate Sudfeld, C.J. Brown, Frank Clark, Devin Gardner, Shilique Calhoun, Connor Cook, Michael Bennett, Braxton Miller, Bill Belton, Darius Hamilton, Jon Davis, Carl Davis, Mitch Leidner, Ameer Abdullah, Kenny Bell, Trevor Siemian, Raheem Mostert and Melvin Gordon.

Tweet us here and remember to use the hashtag #AskB1Gplayers.

Media days are, quite frankly, all talk, and some are better at it than others. The Big Ten might not match the SEC in coaching personalities, but there will be some quotable players and coaches next week in Chicago.

Here are five coaches and players who should fill up our notebooks next week:

COACHES

[+] EnlargeJames Franklin
AP Photo/PennLive.com/Joe HermittJames Franklin should provide some solid quotes in his first media days as Penn State's coach.
James Franklin, Penn State Nittany Lions: Franklin's critics would say he's too much talk and not enough substance, but he elevated Vanderbilt's program and hopes to restore Penn State to glory. He has been as steady sound byte since taking the Penn State job in January and figures to provide some bold statements in Chicago.

Urban Meyer, Ohio State Buckeyes: There are several college coaches who make news just about every time they talk, and Meyer is one of them. Never one to recoil from hyperbole, Meyer will be asked about quarterback Braxton Miller, Ohio State's playoff hopes, bigger-picture issues affecting the game and possibly turning 50.

Kevin Wilson, Indiana Hoosiers: I've covered quite a few coaches in my career and few are as brutally honest as Wilson, a trait much appreciated by us scribes. Indiana football might not move the needle in the Big Ten or nationally, but you'll want to tune in to hear what Wilson has to say about the game's biggest issues.

Pat Fitzgerald, Northwestern Wildcats: Fitzgerald's charisma in front of microphones has endeared him to media and fans, although Nebraska fans are probably a bit ticked with him after his recent remarks. He usually provides some good media-day fodder from the podium and will undoubtedly weigh in more about the player unionization push at Northwestern.

Mark Dantonio, Michigan State Spartans: Some of you will think this is a misprint, but hear me out. I considered other insightful coaches like Jerry Kill and Gary Andersen, but Dantonio, often characterized as dry, actually has a lot of strong opinions. His voice also resonates more nationally after he won Big Ten and Rose Bowl championships last season.

PLAYERS

Nebraska Cornhuskers wide receiver Kenny Bell: Media members owe a debt of gratitude to Nebraska for bringing Bell to Chicago. The man known on Twitter as AfroThunder can discuss just about anything, from the targeting rule to unionizing to topics that have nothing to do with college football.

Michigan State defensive end Shilique Calhoun: He became a big name in the league last season by what he did on the field, but his magnetic personality didn't hurt his profile. Calhoun wears a six-bar face mask during games and turns into his alter ago, the villain Bane, on Saturdays in the fall.

Nebraska running back Ameer Abdullah: There's a reason Abdullah will speak on behalf of the players at Tuesday's Big Ten kickoff luncheon. The Nebraska star running back has earned All-Big Ten honors for both his play and his academics. He's eloquent and thoughtful and should be the latest crowd pleaser at the luncheon.

Wisconsin Badgers running back Melvin Gordon: One of the nice things about this year's media day player contingent is that several of the Big Ten's biggest stars are also excellent talkers. Gordon is extremely comfortable in the spotlight and will weigh in on the Heisman Trophy race, his friendship with Abdullah and his mission to lead Wisconsin to the inaugural playoff.

Michigan Wolverines quarterback Devin Gardner: Gardner is smart and thoughtful and no stranger to the spotlight as a standout recruit and now Michigan's starting quarterback. The fifth-year senior, now working toward a master's degree, will be a popular man in Chicago as he weighs in on his unique career and a pivotal year for the Wolverines.
Big Ten media days are right around the corner. Earlier today, we took a closer look at the players coming to Chicago from the East Division. Now it's time to do the same for the West.

ILLINOIS

Simon Cvijanovic, Sr., OT: He's a two-year starter on the Illini offensive line, spending last season at left tackle for one of the more explosive offenses in the league. He and his younger brother, Peter, a freshman, will be playing for a new position coach, as Tom Brattan was officially hired last week.

Jon Davis, Sr., TE: A versatile player who can line up at tight end or out wide, Davis is one of the Illini's few returning receiving threats after catching 25 balls for 208 yards last season.

Austin Teitsma, Sr., DL: A returning starter at defensive tackle, Teitsma will be a leader on the defense this season. The Illini hope he can help improve a rush defense that was worst in the league last year.

IOWA

Carl Davis, Sr., DT: A second-team All-Big Ten selection last year, Davis is one of the top defensive tackles in the league. He has been projected by some as a possible first-round NFL draft pick next year.

Brandon Scherff, Sr., OL: Scherff is almost guaranteed to be a first-round pick and should challenge for All-America honors as the Hawkeyes' left tackle. Also, he can do this, which is insane.

Mark Weisman, Sr., RB: A former walk-on who was one of the biggest surprises in the Big Ten in 2012, Weisman finished 25 yards shy of 1,000 yards rushing last season. His role might change a little in a crowded backfield this fall.

MINNESOTA

David Cobb, Sr., RB: Cobb had the 12th-highest rushing total in Gophers history last season with 1,202 yards. But he'll face some competition, as Minnesota is loaded at running back.

Mitch Leidner, So., QB: Philip Nelson's offseason departure paved the way for Leidner to take over the Gophers' quarterback job. He's a dangerous runner who needs to become a more accurate passer for Minnesota's offense to take the next step.

Cedric Thompson, Sr., S: A two-year starter at safety, Thompson led the team with 79 tackles a year ago. He also has an intriguing back story.

NEBRASKA

Ameer Abdullah, Sr., RB: One of the star attractions of media day, Abdullah led the Big Ten in rushing last year with 1,690 yards. He's the heart and soul of the Nebraska offense.

Kenny Bell, Sr., WR: Us media types were very excited to see Bell -- a tremendous personality -- included on the list of player attendees. Expect some excellent quotes from Mr. Afro Thunder. He also happens to be an outstanding receiver known almost as much for his ferocious blocking as his speed and ball skills.

Corey Cooper, Sr., S: Cooper led the Huskers with 91 tackles last season and has 17 starts under his belt. He should be one of the leaders for the Blackshirts.

NORTHWESTERN

Ibraheim Campbell, Sr., S: Campbell has been an anchor for the Wildcats' secondary since he was a freshman All-American. Last year, he had 73 tackles and four interceptions.

Collin Ellis, Sr., LB: In his first year as a starter in 2013, Ellis had 78 tackles and three interceptions, returning two of them for scores in the opener at Cal. He shifted to middle linebacker in the offseason.

Trevor Siemian, Sr., QB: The quarterback job is all his now after he split time with Kain Colter the past two seasons. Siemian has a big arm, as evidenced by his 414-yard, four-touchdown performance in last year's finale against Illinois.

PURDUE

Raheem Mostert, Sr., RB: He can claim the title of fastest man in the Big Ten after his success in track this offseason. A dynamic kick returner, Mostert will try to make a big impact on offense this year with a full-time switch to running back.

Sean Robinson, Sr., LB: Converted last summer from backup quarterback to defense, Robinson quickly became a starter and key contributor. His experience and unselfishness makes him a leader for the Boilers.

Ryan Russell, Sr., DE: A veteran of 35 starts, Russell might be Purdue's most athletically gifted defensive player. He had 5.5 tackles for loss and two sacks in 2013.


WISCONSIN

Melvin Gordon, Jr., RB: Another media day main attraction, Gordon is one of the most explosive players in the country. He ran for 1,609 yards while averaging 7.8 yards per carry as a sophomore.

Rob Havenstein, Sr., RT: There won't be many bigger players in Chicago than Havenstein, who checks in at 6-foot-8 and 327 pounds. He has started the past 27 games at right tackle and made second-team All-Big Ten a year ago.

Warren Herring, Sr., DL: Herring will be a key player for the Badgers' defensive line, which lost all three starters from last season. He's also got some pretty sweet moves.
Tick, tock. Tick, tock. Big Ten media days are less than two weeks away, To get you ready, we’re running through three questions facing each Big Ten team and the potential answers we could hear at the Hilton Chicago on July 28 and 29.

Next up is Nebraska, which will bring head coach Bo Pelini, running back Ameer Abdullah, wide receiver Kenny Bell and safety Corey Cooper to the Windy City. Here's some of what they may be asked:

1. Can the Huskers get over the hump?

Sure, it's a tired subject. But when you're Nebraska and you've gone since 1999 without a conference championship and since the 2001 season without playing in a major bowl, the question will persist. Most programs would kill to have the Huskers' recent run under Pelini: 58 wins in six years, and never fewer than nine in a season. Yet Nebraska is not most programs. Pelini appears to have one of his better defenses of late, and there is vast opportunity in the wide-open West Division. Can the Huskers get it done?

2. Is Tommy Armstrong Jr. the answer?

All in all, Armstrong performed pretty well last year for a redshirt freshman quarterback who was asked to take over for Taylor Martinez in midseason. But now he needs to be more than a solid replacement. He has to be the guy who leads the Nebraska offense, and in many ways, be the face of the team. It helps that he has outstanding veteran leadership like Abdullah and Bell to help him out. Still, he has to improve on last year's 51.9 completion percentage and stop the Huskers' maddening recent trend of losing the turnover battle in big games.

3. Is Pelini on solid footing?

And you thought No. 1 was a tired question. Pelini's job status nearly engulfed last season, and most people didn't think he'd be back for a seventh year in Lincoln. Yet the tone has changed around him since the dark days following the loss to UCLA last September. The win over Georgia in the Gator Bowl provided a nice boost to the offseason, and Pelini showed a lighter side by goofing around with Twitter parody alter ego Faux Pelini. There are good vibes around Pelini and the Husker camp now. Can that last through the fall?

Big Ten lunch links

July, 10, 2014
Jul 10
12:30
PM ET
Football, please get here. I can't stand watching Chicago baseball any more.
It's getting closer, folks. The 2014 season will be here before you know it, and Big Ten media days are less than three weeks away.

The league today released the list of players who will be on hand at the Hilton Chicago on July 28-29 for media days and the kickoff luncheon.

Here they are ...

EAST DIVISION

INDIANA

David Cooper, Sr., LB
Nate Sudfeld, Jr., QB
Shane Wynn, Sr., WR*

MARYLAND

C.J. Brown, Sr., QB
Stefon Diggs, Jr., WR*
Jeremiah Johnson, Sr., DB

MICHIGAN

Frank Clark, Sr., DE*
Devin Gardner, Sr., QB*
Jake Ryan, Sr., LB*

MICHIGAN STATE

Shilique Calhoun, Jr., DE*
Connor Cook, Jr., QB*
Kurtis Drummond, Sr., FS*

OHIO STATE

Michael Bennett, Sr., DL*
Jeff Heuerman, Sr., TE*
Braxton Miller, Sr., QB*

PENN STATE

Bill Belton, Sr., RB
Sam Ficken, Sr., PK*
Mike Hull, Sr., LB

RUTGERS

Michael Burton, Sr., FB
Darius Hamilton, Jr., DL
Lorenzo Waters, Sr., DB

WEST DIVISION

ILLINOIS

Simon Cvijanovic, Sr., OT
Jon Davis, Sr., TE
Austin Teitsma, Sr., DL

IOWA

Carl Davis, Sr., DT*
Brandon Scherff, Sr., OL*
Mark Weisman, Sr., RB

MINNESOTA

David Cobb, Sr., RB
Mitch Leidner, So., QB
Cedric Thompson, Sr., S

NEBRASKA

Ameer Abdullah, Sr., RB*
Kenny Bell, Sr., WR*
Corey Cooper, Sr., S*

NORTHWESTERN

Ibraheim Campbell, Sr., S*
Collin Ellis, Sr., LB
Trevor Siemian, Sr., QB

PURDUE

Raheem Mostert, Sr., RB
Sean Robinson, Sr., LB
Ryan Russell, Sr., DE

WISCONSIN

Melvin Gordon, Jr., RB*
Rob Havenstein, Sr., RT*
Warren Herring, Sr., DL

* indicates previous all-conference selection

I really like this list. The main reason: the number of non-seniors. Nothing against the graybeards, but too often Big Ten teams have brought only seniors to media days even if other players were better, more marketable, strong team leaders and more charismatic with reporters. Yes, I'm incredibly biased about this event: I want the best talkers.

While several Big Ten teams are taking the senior-only approach, others are bringing underclassmen who fill key roles. Minnesota will bring sophomore quarterback Mitch Leidner because he's now the leader of the offense. The same goes for Indiana with junior signal-caller Nate Sudfeld. Michigan State is bringing juniors Connor Cook and Shilique Calhoun because they both played huge roles in last year's championship run. Stefon Diggs is the most recognizable Maryland player, even though he's a junior. Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon isn't technically a senior, but barring injury this will be his last year as a Badger -- and his only chance to attend media days.

There's a decent contingent of quarterbacks -- seven in all -- that includes two-time Big Ten offensive player of the year Braxton Miller, Cook and Michigan's Devin Gardner. The only major omission is Penn State quarterback Christian Hackenberg, who could be one of the league's top players this season. The Lions throw us a bit of a curveball with kicker Sam Ficken. Interesting.

On behalf of all Big Ten media members, I'd like to thank Nebraska for bringing Bell. We are eternally grateful. And Kenny, I will make fun of you for being a Canucks fan.

Staying with the Huskers, senior running back Ameer Abdullah will speak on behalf of the players at the Big Ten kickoff luncheon on July 29. An excellent choice.

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