Big Ten: Kurt Kittner

Big Ten Week 11: Did you know?

November, 8, 2013
11/08/13
10:00
AM ET
The league has three teams taking a breather on Saturday before resuming their regular-season closing stretch run. But there is still plenty of action around the conference, and these facts and figures will help set the scene for a critical weekend for a few Big Ten squads.
  • Indiana might not play a lot of defense, but it definitely balances that out with an offense that is playing at the highest level in school history. The Hoosiers have scored at least 28 points in nine consecutive games dating back to last season, the longest stretch ever for the program. Much of that success under coach Kevin Wilson has come to the upgrades he's made in the passing game, which has thrown for 300 yards in a game six times already this season.
  • Badly in need of a win to keep its hopes in the division alive, the venue would seem to indicate Michigan has a great chance of getting one this weekend. The Wolverines own the longest active home winning streak among BCS conference teams, rattling off 19 consecutive victories in the Big House. They've still got a long way to go to match the school record of 50, set way back from 1901 to '07, but simply getting to 20 against Nebraska would surely be good enough in the meantime.
  • The Huskers may have needed what amounted to a miracle win last week against Northwestern, but with or without a Hail Mary, they've shown remarkable resiliency when trailing in games over the past two seasons. The latest come-from-behind victory marked the fifth time in the past two seasons Nebraska has rallied from a double-digit deficit to win.
  • After climbing up another rung on the all-time total offense list at Illinois last week, there's only one guy Nathan Scheelhaase needs to catch as his prolific career winds down. Heading into the final four weeks of the regular season, the senior quarterback needs to average 357 yards per game to track down Juice Williams and his school-record 10,594 yards. Scheelhaase jumped ahead of Kurt Kittner last week with a total that was just one yard short of the average he needs to post for the rest of the season.
  • Iowa's formula for success is about as straightforward as it could be this season: Win the turnover battle, win the game. The Hawkeyes are unbeaten in five outings when they have more takeaways than giveaways, and they haven't won a game when the margin is reversed. Coincidentally, Iowa has forced exactly one more turnover than it has given away -- and is one game over .500 for the season as well.
  • As if the Purdue offense hasn't struggled enough, it has to overcome some bad historical mojo this weekend as well. The Boilermakers have been shut out in both of their past two outings, and in program history, they've put up a goose egg four times when playing on Nov. 9. Iowa is looking to add to that misery for a team that has only scored one touchdown since September.
  • Prefer rushing attacks to the pass-happy offenses spreading around the nation? Wisconsin and BYU will be must-see television then. The only two teams in the country with a pair of rushers averaging more than 100 yards per game face off at Camp Randall Stadium in a game that will thrill any fan of ground-based football. Wisconsin's Melvin Gordon (134.3 yards per game) and James White (100.5) will take turns with BYU's Taysom Hill (105.1) and Jamaal Williams (104.7) in a matchup that might hardly need any passing attempts to entertain.
  • There may be many more to come, but Christian Hackenberg is already etching his name in the record books at Penn State in his first season of leading the offense. The quarterback has thrown for at least 200 yards six times in 2013, the most of any freshman in program history. Hackenberg knocked the 2001 season by Zack Mills out of top spot by tossing for 240 yards in the win over Illinois last week, and he's got four more chances to extend that mark.
  • Playing at home hasn't been much of an advantage for Minnesota since it opened TCF Bank Stadium, but the venue is starting to become more friendly lately. The Gophers are a modest 11-8 in front of their fans since Jerry Kill took over the program, but one more win would get the team back to a .500 all-time record in the five-year-old facility. Minnesota is currently 16-17, but a victory over Penn State would even up its home mark for the first time since Sept. 2010.

Illinois' Mount Rushmore

February, 23, 2009
2/23/09
5:08
PM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Illinois rounds out the list of team-by-team Rushmores. I'll take a look at the Big Ten's Rushmore on Tuesday.

Despite struggling for the better part of the last 15 years, Illinois boasts several of college football's all-time greats. 

I doubt I'll get much argument with these selections, though there were some tough choices. Illinois enjoyed periods of success during the 1920s, 1960s and 1980s.

I realize my list challenges the historian inside each of you, but Illinois' not so recent past was simply too impressive to ignore. 

  • Red Grange -- Quite possibly the most dominant player in college football history, Grange earned All-America honors in each of his three seasons with Illinois and was the first recipient of the Big Ten MVP award in 1924. Grange accounted for 2,646 yards of offense and 34 touchdowns at Illinois. He's a charter member of both the pro and college football Halls of Fame and was ESPN's pick as the greatest college football player ever. 
  • Dick Butkus -- The namesake of the Butkus Award remains one of college football's greatest defensive players. Butkus twice earned first-team All-America honors, won the Big Ten MVP in 1963 and led Illinois to a Rose Bowl win on Jan. 1, 1964. He averaged 14.4 tackles a game in his Illini career and finished third in Heisman Trophy voting in 1964. Butkus and Grange are the only Illinois players to have their numbers retired.
  • Jim Grabowski -- A two-time All-American, Grabowski finished his career as the Big Ten's all-time leading rusher. Like his teammate Butkus, he placed third in the Heisman Trophy voting and claimed Big Ten MVP honors, both in 1965. He won Rose Bowl MVP honors after rushing for 125 yards in Illinois' win against Washington. Grabowski also excelled as a student and was a longtime radio analyst for Illinois football.
  • Robert Zuppke -- Zuppke laid the foundation for Illinois' early success on the gridiron, serving as head coach for 29 years. He was an offensive innovator and coached Illinois to four national titles and seven conference championships. The field at Memorial Stadium is named after Zuppke, who coached Grange and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951. 
Others considered for Illinois' Rushmore included: Tony Eason, Jeff George, Dana Howard, Alex Agase, Moe Gardner, J Leman, Kevin Hardy and Kurt Kittner.

SPONSORED HEADLINES