Big Ten: Mike Gesicki

STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- Penn State tight end Adam Breneman, ESPN’s top-rated TE-Y of the 2013 class, is “out indefinitely” with an undisclosed injury, according to a news release from the program.

Head coach James Franklin has a policy not to disclose injuries and has refused to comment or confirm past ones. So Franklin’s announcement Monday afternoon definitely came as a surprise and might speak to its severity.

The injury isn’t the first to Breneman, who was ranked as the 67th best overall player in the 2013 class. He missed his entire senior season of high school with a torn ACL but still enrolled in January 2013 and dismissed any talk of redshirting. He recovered quickly enough to play in 11 games last season and finished with 15 catches for 186 yards and three touchdowns.

Depth is a concern for Penn State, but tight end is just about the only position where that concern doesn’t apply. Jesse James, a junior, returns as the top tight end and the Lions’ leading receiver. Kyle Carter, who caught 18 passes last season, also returns and was a candidate for Big Ten tight end of the year two seasons ago.

Penn State also has Brent Wilkerson, who missed last season with an injury, and true freshman Mike Gesicki on the roster at tight end.

Breneman would’ve added another wrinkle into the passing attack and likely would’ve seen an increased role while splitting time with Carter. The injury hardly means it’s time for this offense to panic, but the question now centers on where Breneman will fit in with this team once he recovers.

Penn State recruiting roundtable

February, 6, 2014
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STATE COLLEGE, Pa. -- National signing day is finally in the books, so we decided to take a closer look at the Nittany Lions' 2014 recruiting class.

Big Ten recruiting reporter Tom VanHaaren and I got together to discuss and answer these questions:

What surprised or impressed you the most about this class?

Tom VanHaaren: I know it's not surprising for prospects to follow a coach to the new school when there's a coaching change, but I was somewhat surprised in this case. James Franklin got five former Vanderbilt commits to join him at Penn State, which is significant. One of those commitments, Chance Sorrell, committed to Penn State essentially sight unseen. That says a lot about how these prospects feel about Franklin.

[+] EnlargeDe'Andre Thompkins
Courtesy of IntersportESPN 300 ATH De'Andre Thompkins has major upside, but he might take time to adjust to playing WR.
Josh Moyer: By far, I'm most impressed with the receivers. It's one of the best groups in the nation; Penn State has three wideouts in the ESPN 300 (De'Andre Thompkins, Saeed Blacknall, Chris Godwin) and another prospect (Troy Apke) who's on the cusp of being a four-star prospect. Last January, a lot of recruiting analysts expected PSU to pick up one -- maybe two -- receivers. Nobody quite saw this coming.

Who is Penn State's best commit outside of the ESPN 300?

TVH: I really like four-star running back Johnathan Thomas and tight end Mike Gesicki, a three-star commit. Gesicki was targeted by some big schools, including Ohio State, and should eventually be a contributor on offense. At 6-foot-5, 215 pounds, Gesicki has really good size and should fit in well at Penn State.

JM: Count me in on the Gesicki bandwagon. Former coach Bill O'Brien felt he was the best tight end in the nation, and James Franklin emphasized he wouldn't pigeonhole his personnel. His system will fit the players, not the other way around, and that should be great news to a talent like Gesicki. Linebacker Troy Reeder is also a big-time player and, because of Penn State's depth, could see considerable time by 2015.

Who is most likely to contribute as a true freshman?

TVH: I think it's probably Thompkins or Blacknall. Both are really good receivers, and Thompkins is already enrolled and on campus. With Allen Robinson leaving for the NFL there is opportunity to get some playing time early, so I think those two have a chance.

JM: I think it's definitely going to be a receiver -- but I'm going with Godwin and Blacknall. I think Thompkins is in a similar position that Geno Lewis was in as a true freshman. Both were highly ranked in the ESPN 300, both were athletes playing wideout, and neither played wideout in high school. Lewis needed a redshirt season to get accustomed to the position and, in a similar vein, Thompkins is just not as polished as some of his counterparts right now. Thompkins enrolled early and has a lot of upside, but I think Godwin's a safer bet right now.

Moving forward, how does James Franklin compare to Bill O'Brien as a recruiter?

TVH: It's tough to compare the two because of a few factors. O'Brien was dealing with the sanctions when he was hired and had to overcome those issues. He also held on to Christian Hackenberg and Adam Breneman, which was a big deal looking back on it. Franklin is coming in with a lot more positive vibes and excitement around the program. Franklin has already said, though, that he will focus on keeping the in-state prospects home and dominating the region as well. That was an area where O'Brien struggled, whether it was because of the sanctions or not. Franklin should have more success there.

JM: O'Brien wasn't a salesman. He tried to be straightforward, was a great evaluator of talent and an even better coach. Franklin is a salesman. He's charismatic, confident and isn't afraid to go after players in Florida or California. He's definitely casting a wider net than O'Brien. If both coaches were on a level playing field, with no sanctions, I'm not sure who would come out on top. But, because of the foundation O'Brien built, I have no doubt Franklin will have more success recruiting than his predecessor.
Penn State coach James Franklin has been in the Big Ten for less than a month, but he's already making big news on the recruiting trail. At his introductory news conference Jan. 11, Franklin proclaimed: "We are going to dominate the state. We are going to dominate the region." He then went out and landed eight recruits in the three-plus weeks before signing day, flipping five who had pledged to Vanderbilt, his former team. Franklin upgraded Penn State's perimeter with players like wide receiver Saeed Blacknall. It's safe to say the Big Ten recruiting landscape is a little more interesting with Franklin in the mix.

ESPN.com caught up with the Penn State coach earlier Wednesday to discuss his first recruiting class with the Lions.

Where does today rank among your favorite days of the year?

James Franklin: Professionally, it's a really good day. You're talking about your future, you're talking about the possibilities of what these young men are going to bring to your program. So from that perspective, I enjoy it, there's no doubt about it. And I'm a guy who likes recruiting because I like being successful, and good players help.

[+] EnlargeJames Franklin
AP Photo/ John BealeFrom the moment he took over as Penn State's coach James Franklin set out to make a big impact on the recruiting trail.
What were your main goals with this class, given the limited time you had to finish it off?

JF: Well, we had major holes in the roster from a scholarship reduction standpoint. We had to try to fill some needs, although we're not going to fill all of our needs in one class. The ones that were obvious, we only had two scholarship offensive tackles in the program, so that was important for us. When you've got a quarterback like [Christian] Hackenberg, you better have some weapons to throw the ball to, so wideouts were important. And then continue to work on depth in the D-line as well as the secondary. We still have a long way to go, but considering we had three weeks to finish this out, we did pretty well.

What stands out about the wide receivers you brought in?

JF: The combination of [Mike] Gesicki at tight end, who's really a big wideout, H-back type guy, and then at wideout, the size and speed combination that we have, I feel really good about that, with Saeed Blacknall and Chris Godwin and all the guys we have. [Troy] Apke as well, I think it's a nice class. When you have a quarterback like Hackenberg, it helps you recruit, but it's also a responsibility for us to surround that guy with as much talent as possible.

How much was speed an objective with this class?

JF: Speed always is an objective for us. We will have the fastest team in the Big Ten. When you say that, a lot of people think you're talking about DBs and wide receivers, but for us, it's kickers, it's offensive line, it's every position. We want speed throughout our team.

You've talked about players committing to coaches perhaps more than schools. Is too much made out of the school versus the coach? You obviously had relationships with several of these guys from your time at Vanderbilt.

JF: I don't know if that's exactly what I said. I said the school's a major factor and always will be, but with the recruiting process and teams and organizations, it's about the people. You're going to look at the schools and the rankings first, but once you narrow it down to a group of schools you're comfortable with, it comes down to how you feel about the people. It's not about the buildings; it's about the people inside the buildings. That comes down to relationships and trust and all those things. We've had guys we've been recruiting across the country for two years, and we were going to stick with those guys. The same thing with the recruits and families. They were comfortable with us and who we are as men and how we conduct ourselves. It also helped that we went from one school to another that has similar philosophies when it comes to academics.

Did you notice any differences being in the Big Ten or this region?

JF: It's too early to tell. We were just scrambling the last three weeks. I'll have a better idea next year or after spring. The biggest difference is that Nittany Lion logo on your shirt carries a lot of weight in this part of the country and nationally. This is a national brand. And I'm a Pennsylvania guy. I have a lot of connections in this part of the country. So does my staff. It's a big deal for the Penn State coaches to come by the school, to be in that community. This is a very, very proud, storied, historic program, and people are yearning to get back to that. That's what makes this place so special. There's just so many positive things to sell.

You mentioned the defensive line. What do you like about the guys you brought in there?

JF: They're all going to have to contribute. With our situation, all these guys were recruited to come in and play. Once they get here, if they're not ready to play, whether it's emotionally or physically, then we'll redshirt them. But with our scholarship numbers, our mentality is all these guys are going to have to come to play. Maybe they're playing special teams initially, but by the midpoint of the season, you hope these guys are getting significant reps. We're going to have to do that for the next couple of years. Both [Tarow] Barney and [Antoine] White are going to have to play. The fact that they're already here on campus gives them a much better chance, just learning how to practice and the mentality and how we do things. Culturally, our players are good because they've been winning for a long time.

You want to focus in Pennsylvania and the region, but how important is it for you to extend the reach, especially to the South?

JF: We've got to dominate the state and we've got to have a huge presence in this region. On top of that, we're going to recruit nationally by position. You better know where the top players are by position, and you never know. Maybe a kid grew up being a Penn State fan or has a relative that went to Penn State or played here. Now you've got an in and a chance to go pluck a guy from another part of the country that is a big-time player.

Did you send any message to the Big Ten with how you finished off this class?

JF: I don't know about all that. I'm proud of the staff, I'm proud of the players that helped us recruit these guys and be tremendous hosts. I'm just focused on Penn State and doing the best job we possibly can. The more days that we have like this, attack the day with everything we've got, academically, athletically, socially and spiritually, the Saturdays will start taking care of themselves.

Big Ten class rankings analysis 

January, 8, 2014
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Ohio State has been on a roll on the recruiting trail in the past few weeks. The commitments the Buckeyes have landed, along with a few other happenings in the Big Ten, have impacted the class rankings.

Here is a look at the most recent trends within the Big Ten.

Big Ten class rankings analysis 

November, 13, 2013
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There has been movement on the recruiting trail within the Big Ten conference, so it's time once again to take a look at a few trends and changes among the teams. Here is a look at the latest for the Big Ten class rankings.

Trending up:

Tom VanHaaren: Michigan State has a chance to move up in the rankings if it can close strong. ESPN 300 prospects Jamil Kamara (Virginia Beach, Va./Bishop Sullivan Catholic) and Kiy Hester (Wayne, N.J./DePaul Catholic) recently added the Spartans to their top list, while Montae Nicholson (Monroeville, Pa./Gateway) and Parrker Westphal (Bolingbrook, Ill./Bolingbrook) are still listing Michigan State in their top group as well. The strong defensive play on the field has Michigan State in position to play for a Big Ten championship, which could further help this recruiting class.


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It’s called the Big Ten Conference for a reason.

From big offers, to big official visits to big commitments, the Big Ten has been abuzz with activity.

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From commitments to big official visit weekends, it's been a busy week of recruiting in the Big Ten.

Conference recruiting writers Brad Bournival and Tom VanHaaren take a look back at the week that was and look ahead as teams build toward the future.

Boilermakers flip a commitment

Purdue picked up a pledge from safety Timothy Cason II (Clarkston, Mich./Clarkston) this week. Though unranked and a former Western Michigan commit, the Boilermakers were able to flip the switch on the 6-foot, 179-pound Cason and make him the ninth commitment of the 2014 class.


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Big Ten class rankings analysis 

October, 9, 2013
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Each Wednesday, ESPN RecruitingNation updates its national class rankings. For an in-depth look at the Big Ten conference, check out our conference rankings:

1. Michigan, 15 commits: The Wolverines are No. 6 in the RecruitingNation class rankings, which includes nine ESPN300 prospects -- among them headliner and No. 2 overall Jabrill Peppers (Paramus, N.J./Paramus Catholic High). Michigan could make a move into the top-5 by winning the race for No. 4 Da’Shawn Hand (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge High). Defensive tackle and No. 67 Malik McDowell (Southfield, Mi./Southfield High) is another top target still in play. No. 41 overall John Smith (Long Beach, Calif./Polytechnic High) will visit Nov. 29, and is another top target remaining.

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There are still a ton of prospects on the board for Big Ten teams, so conference recruiting reporters Tom VanHaaren and Brad Bournival take a look at the best and worst case scenarios remaining for each team.

Illinois
Best-case scenario: Illinois picked up an offensive line commit on Monday with Peter Cvijanovic (Great Barrington, Mass./East Coast Prep), which gives the Illini two offensive line commits. Despite having four wide receiver commits on board, it looks like the staff would take another receiver in this class.

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Indiana takes center stage in these week’s Big Ten storylines, but that doesn’t mean other schools aren’t getting involved.

Here’s a look at the week that was and what’s ahead:

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From Wisconsin moving up in the polls to a few schools moving down, it was a busy week in the Big Ten and the class rankings reflect that.

Here’s a look at what conference recruiting writers Brad Bournival and Tom VanHaaren saw and some trends to follow in the upcoming weeks:

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The Early Offer is RecruitingNation's regular feature, giving you a daily dose of recruiting in the mornings. Today's offerings: Georgia scored a major recruiting victory on Thursday when it landed an ESPN 300 defensive end; Ohio State is hosting more than just the Wisconsin Badgers this weekend in Columbus; and Oregon hosts a ESPN 300 speedster who would be a great fit for the Ducks’ offense.

Dawgs land key defensive commitment
With a monster SEC matchup against LSU on Saturday, Georgia received some positive recruiting news on Thursday when ESPN 300 defensive end Keyon Brown (Wauchula, Fla./Hardee County) committed to the Dawgs.


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From Iowa, Michigan State and Wisconsin grabbing a commit, to Penn State receiving great news on the recruiting front, to Ohio State playing host to some big-time official visitors this weekend, Big Ten storylines were everywhere this week.

Here’s a look at a busy time in this week’s Big Ten storylines:


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Big Ten class rankings analysis 

September, 25, 2013
9/25/13
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There wasn’t any movement in the class rankings this week, but there are some trends developing.

Here’s a look at some things to watch within the conference recruiting landscape:

Trending up:

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The latest version of the ESPN class rankings are out, and there are seven Big Ten teams within the top 40 classes.

With movement happening across the board, there are trends and stories developing, so Big Ten recruiting writers Brad Bournival and Tom VanHaaren give you a look at what to watch within the conference:

Trending up:

Tom VanHaaren: The number of ESPN 300 prospects committing to Big Ten schools. The number hasn’t started to increase yet, but there is a good chance it will. As it currently stands the Big Ten has 25 ESPN 300 commitments within its teams. That number is low compared to the 77 committed to SEC schools and 35 to ACC programs. However, there are roughly 18 ESPN 300 prospects still listing Big Ten programs, including No. 4 ranked Da’Shawn Hand (Woodbridge, Va./Woodbridge) with Michigan, No. 1 inside linebacker Raekwon McMillan (Hinesville, Ga./Liberty County), Malik McDowell (Southfield, Mich./Southfield), Montae Nicholson (Monroeville, Pa./Gateway) and more.


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