Big Ten: Royce Adams

Purdue's Adams could play both ways

September, 15, 2009
9/15/09
2:47
PM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg


Purdue wants to use Royce Adams as a wide receiver. Unfortunately, it might not have that luxury.

Adams, who played three seasons and started 19 games at cornerback before moving to wide receiver during the offseason, is listed as a backup at both positions on this week's depth chart.

Purdue has been a bit banged up in the secondary, and starting corner Brandon King missed last Saturday's game against Oregon with a thigh bruise. Corner David Pender also was limited last week in practice.

Free safety Torri Williams moved over to cornerback for the Oregon game, while Josh McKinley earned the start at safety. Adams played about 12 snaps on defense and recorded a tackle.

Hope lists King as probable for Saturday's game against Northern Illinois, but Adams is there just in case.

"If everybody was healthy, we’d keep [Adams] on offense," Hope said, "but right now, we have to wait and see what happens with Brandon."

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg


Purdue's depth charts were rewritten almost every day of training camp, but head coach Danny Hope drafted the one that counts on Sunday.

It's pretty clear youth will be served this fall at Purdue, as seven freshmen or sophomores are listed in starting roles for the season opener Saturday against Toledo. Sophomore Ralph Bolden, who had a superb spring, got the edge at running back over fifth-year senior Jaycen Taylor, though both men likely will log plenty of carries this fall.

Other items of note:
  • Sophomore Gerald Gooden and redshirt freshman Kawann Short earned the starting spots at defensive end and defensive tackle, respectively, alongside veterans Mike Neal and Ryan Kerrigan. Purdue's defensive line is filled with young players other than Neal and Kerrigan.
  • Senior wide receiver Royce Adams, a converted cornerback, earned a starting job alongside junior Keith Smith and senior Aaron Valentin. Backing them up are a bunch of young players, including true freshmen Gary Bush and Antavian Edison, both of whom have impressed in camp. Adams and Valentin also will return kicks.
  • Purdue is very young at left tackle, with sophomore Dennis Kelly listed as the starter ahead of redshirt freshmen Peters Drey and Monroe Brooks.
  • Sophomore Carson Wiggs will handle field goals and kickoffs, while senior Chris Summers will serve as the team's punter. Wiggs took over field-goal duties from Summers midway through last season.
  • Senior linebacker Jason Werner reclaims his starting job after missing all of last season with back problems. Backing up Werner and middle linebacker Chris Carlino are two promising true freshmen -- Dwayne Beckford and Antwon Higgs.

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Thought the position rankings were over? Think again.

We don't forget the specialists on the Big Ten blog, so after a lengthy lull -- blame training camp -- it's time to examine the kicking game around the league. The rankings are based on kickers and punters, return men and coverage units.

Let's begin.

1. Michigan State -- The Spartans return two second-team All-Big Ten picks in kicker Brett Swenson and punter Aaron Bates, who averaged 42 yards on 71 punts. The return game looks a little suspect but a healthy Mark Dell should help.

2. Michigan -- It helps to have the best punter in the league in senior Zoltan Mesko, a leading candidate for the Ray Guy Award. Michigan should be more dynamic on returns with Martavious Odoms and others. The big question here is at kicker.

3. Penn State -- Punter Jeremy Boone didn't get many chances last fall but executed well when called upon. There are questions at kicker after the loss of first-team All-Big Ten performer Kevin Kelly, and Derrick Williams will be missed on returns. Penn State is always good on coverage teams.

4. Ohio State -- A few more question marks here than normal, but Ohio State's special teams track record under Jim Tressel can't be denied. Aaron Pettrey should be fine at kicker and has a strong leg. Ohio State brings back the league's top punt return man in Ray Small. The Buckeyes need to upgrade their kick return unit after finishing 108th nationally in 2008.

5. Iowa -- Punter Ryan Donahue is a stud and likely will set school records by the time he's done. Daniel Murray showed he could make a clutch kick against Penn State, though he remains in competition with Trent Mossbrucker. Andy Brodell is a big loss at punt returner, and Jewel Hampton might not be available to return kicks.

6. Wisconsin -- I really like Wisconsin's young specialists, kicker Phillip Welch and punter Brad Nortman. But you can't rank last nationally in kickoff returns and expect to be high on this list. Wisconsin needs to jump start its returns with David Gilreath.

7. Indiana -- Chris Hagerup is a terrific young punter after nailing 13 punts for more than 50 yards last fall. Demetrius McCray looks solid on kickoff returns. Indiana must replace former All-Big Ten kicker Austin Starr, but Starr really struggled last fall (10-for-17). Heralded freshman kicker Mitch Ewald joins the mix.

8. Purdue -- Carson Wiggs did a nice job at kicker after taking over for Chris Summers, who will handle the punting duties this fall. Purdue needs to improve its punting after finishing last in the league in 2008, but the return game looks solid with Aaron Valentin and Royce Adams.

9. Minnesota -- The Gophers are starting over after losing both of their top specialists. They'll be relying on junior Eric Ellestad and freshman Dan Orseske to step up. It helps to have the league's most dynamic return man in Troy Stoudermire.

10. Northwestern -- All too often, the kicking game has cost Northwestern, most notably in the Alamo Bowl against Missouri. Stefan Demos is finally healthy and could handle both the kicking and punting duties this fall. The Wildcats could use a boost in the return game from Stephen Simmons or Andrew Brewer.

11. Illinois -- I really like sophomore kicker Matt Eller, who beat Iowa with a field goal last November. But it's no secret the Illini need significant upgrades on their punt teams after finishing 10th in punting and last in returns. Florida transfer Jarred Fayson should boost the return game. The Illini must improve their kickoff and punt coverage.

Big Ten lunch links

August, 12, 2009
8/12/09
12:00
PM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Find the missing link.

Purdue spring wrap

May, 6, 2009
5/06/09
9:05
AM ET
Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Purdue Boilermakers
2008 overall record: 4-8

2008 conference record:2-6

Returning starters

Offense: 4; Defense: 7; Special teams: 2

Top returners

WR Keith Smith, TE Kyle Adams, LT Zach Reckman, RB Jaycen Taylor, DE Ryan Kerrigan, DT Mike Neal, S Torri Williams, CB Brandon King, LB Joe Holland

Key losses

QB Curtis Painter, QB Justin Siller, RB Kory Sheets, WR Greg Orton, WR Desmond Tardy, DT Alex Magee, LB Anthony Heygood, S Frank Duong

2008 statistical leaders (* returners)

Rushing: Kory Sheets (1,185 yds)
Passing
: Curtis Painter (2,400 yds)
Receiving: Desmond Tardy (876 yds)
Tackles
: Anthony Heygood (114)
Sacks
: Ryan Kerrigan* (7)
Interceptions
: Torri Williams and Dwight Mclean (2)

2009 Schedule
Sept. 5 Toledo
Sept. 12 at Oregon
Sept. 19 Northern Illinois
Sept. 26 Notre Dame
Oct. 3 Northwestern
Oct. 10 at Minnesota
Oct. 17 Ohio State
Oct. 24 Illinois
Oct. 31 at Wisconsin
Nov. 7 at Michigan
Nov. 14 Michigan State
Nov. 21 at Indiana
Spring answers

1. Backs stacked -- Running back was a major question entering the spring, especially with Jaycen Taylor still rehabbing from a torn ACL. But sophomore Ralph Bolden came out of nowhere to spark the Boilers' rushing attack. Bolden capped an excellent spring with 153 rush yards and two touchdowns in the spring game. He finished with 420 rush yards in four spring scrimmages. Dan Dierking also performed well, and the running back spot should be deep once Taylor gets healthy and heralded freshman Al-Terek McBurse enters the mix. 

2. Tight ends surge -- First-year head coach Danny Hope raved about his tight ends this spring, and the group will be featured more in the offense after a one-year hiatus. Projected starter Kyle Adams showed what he can do when healthy this spring, making 10 receptions in the spring scrimmages. He'll be pushed by both Jeff Lindsay and Jeff Panfil.

3. Defensive line solid -- Line play could be a strength on both sides of the ball, and the defensive front looked promising this spring. Defensive end Ryan Kerrigan appears ready to take another step after recording a team-high seven sacks last fall. He should get help from talented young players like Kawann Short and Gerald Gooden. Defensive tackle Mike Neal is very underrated inside and should have a big year.

Fall questions

1. Joey's time -- Senior quarterback Joey Elliott has waited his turn to start at quarterback, and barring a dramatic shift, he'll get it this fall. Still, Purdue would feel much more comfortable if Justin Siller was pushing Elliott for the top job. Siller might have been the team's No. 1 quarterback before his dismissal from school for violating academic policy. Elliott needs to elevate his game after three years as a backup, and Purdue must further develop backup Caleb TerBush.

2. Linebacker play -- There were some encouraging signs this spring, especially the re-emergence of oft-injured senior Jason Werner. But the rushing totals allowed in the spring scrimmages are troubling, and Purdue needs to identify three or four reliable linebackers after losing mainstay Anthony Heygood. The line and the secondary look solid, but linebacker is a bit iffy.

3. Wide receiver -- Purdue loses a ton of production at wide receiver, and Hope is still working to find capable targets for Elliott this fall. Keith Smith had a very solid spring and Aaron Valentin should take on a greater role this fall, but the Boilers need more bodies at receiver. They're hoping for more development this summer from converted cornerback Royce Adams.

Big Ten lunch links

April, 2, 2009
4/02/09
12:00
PM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Links you can't live without.

The spring will be about players such as Michael Adams and Justin Boren working in on the offensive line, or Lamaar Thomas and DeVier Posey stepping into bigger roles at receiver, or Etienne Sabino battling for time at linebacker, or a cast of virtual unknowns competing for the starting cornerback spot vacated by [Malcolm] Jenkins.

"He could change his mind before the Major League Baseball draft on June 9-10. 'There's a greater chance of me coming back [to play football] for sure than me leaving,' said Decker, who is batting .326. 'When that day comes, I'm going to have to make a decision. I don't want to make a decision, but I have to. That will be something I will make with my family and people close to me. I'm getting some good advice, and I have good people around me, so I'll be fine when the time comes.'"

Three questions for Purdue

August, 14, 2008
8/14/08
10:00
AM ET

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- I'm covering Purdue's media day festivities throughout the morning. Check back later for plenty of Boiler updates (I always wanted to write that).

For now, here are three questions facing Purdue this fall:

How will the team navigate its challenging schedule?

The Boilermakers didn't make it easy on Tiller in his final season. A normally manageable nonconference schedule turns treacherous this fall, as Purdue plays Oregon, Central Michigan and annual rival Notre Dame. Purdue also has road games against Ohio State and Michigan State. The good news is both the Oregon and Central Michigan games are at home, where Purdue went 5-2 last season. Having a senior quarterback like Curtis Painter usually helps, but the schedule provides both Painter and Tiller several chances for validation. Big games have recently been the knock on Purdue, and the slate is filled with them.

Who will step up to replace the production of wide receiver Dorien Bryant and tight end Dustin Keller?

Greg Orton was often overshadowed by Bryant, but the senior has been consistent and should fit in nicely as a featured receiver. Purdue will ask for more from Desmond Tardy and continued contributions from running back Kory Sheets, who caught 30 passes last season. The spotlight also will be on junior-college transfers Aaron Valentin and Arsenio Curry, who weren't brought in to watch. Valentin joined the team this spring and got adjusted to the system, while Curry must play catchup in camp. Keller was a unique talent and can't be duplicated, but junior Kyle Adams brings some experience to the tight end spot.

Who will fill the playmaking gaps on defense?

The Boilermakers lost their best pass rusher in end Cliff Avril and their best overall defender in cornerback Terrell Vinson. Of the two units, the line looks to be in better shape to fill the void, especially with Alex Magee and Ryan Baker occupying the interior. The secondary is a different story, but Brandon King's move from safety to corner could be a good solution, especially if safety Torri Williams can finally stay healthy. Junior-college transfer Dwight Mclean should provide depth at safety, but Purdue will look for more from cornerbacks David Pender and Royce Adams.

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

This will be the first of three parts as I break down the Big Ten defensive backs. Check back for rankings of safeties and cornerbacks. Despite losing several standout cornerbacks (Justin King, Jack Ikegwuonu, Terrell Vinson), the league returns a bunch of top-end players and teams have filled in the gaps nicely. 

Here's the rundown:

1. Ohio State -- All four starters are back, led by Thorpe Award frontrunner Malcolm Jenkins, who likely would have been a first- or second-round draft pick had he left school after last season. Fellow cornerback Donald Washington is suspended for the first two games but should make a significant impact when he returns. Ohio State would like more interceptions from safeties Anderson Russell and Kurt Coleman, who had none last year but still combined to break up nine passes.

2. Penn State -- King's ability to shut down an opponent's top receiver will be missed, but Penn State still has good depth at cornerback with emerging junior A.J. Wallace, returning starter Lydell Sargeant and Tony Davis, who started every game at corner in 2006 before moving to safety during an injury-plagued junior season. Anthony Scirrotto is arguably the top playmaking safety in the conference with 10 career interceptions.

3. Michigan -- The Wolverines might feature the league's best cornerback tandem in senior Morgan Trent and sophomore Donovan Warren, who combined for 93 tackles and 13 pass breakups last season. They need some help at safety after the loss of all-conference selection Jamar Adams, but Stevie Brown played well as a reserve last year and Brandon Harrison has experience and versatility.

4. Michigan State -- Safety Otis Wiley backslid a bit last year but should recapture the form of 2006, when he ranked seventh in the Big Ten in tackles and had 10 pass breakups. The Spartans ranked fourth in the league in pass defense last year and have good depth at cornerback behind veteran Kendell Davis-Clark.

5. Illinois -- Vontae Davis will push Jenkins for the title of Big Ten's best cornerback. He ranked sixth in the league in both interceptions and pass breakups last year. Dere Hicks and Miami Thomas provide depth at the other corner spot, but Illinois must replace safeties Kevin Mitchell and Justin Harrison, who combined for 155 tackles, six interceptions and 24 pass breakups last season. If guys like Travon Bellamy, Nate Bussey and Bo Flowers perform, this group will move up the list. 

6. Iowa -- There's hope here despite the losses of starting cornerbacks Charles Godfrey and Adam Shada, both honorable mention All-Big Ten selections last season. Senior Bradley Fletcher received ample experience the last two years, but the Hawkeyes would like another solid corner or two to emerge. Both starting safeties return to brace the unit. 

7. Wisconsin -- Shane Carter is a budding star at safety after leading the league with seven interceptions last season, but much like other areas on the Badgers' depth chart, health has been a bugaboo. If cornerbacks Allen Langford and Aaron Henry bounce back from ACL injuries, the unit should be strong. If not, there will be plenty of pressure on young defensive backs like Mario Goins and Jay Valai.

8. Purdue -- The Boilermakers lost their best cover man (Vinson) from a unit that ranked seventh in the league against the pass last season. To avoid a drop off, they need better play from Royce Adams and continued production from David Pender. If safety Torri Williams can finally stay healthy after a rash of ailments, Purdue's secondary should be stable. 

9. Northwestern -- This unit no longer has any excuse to be a liability. Safety Brendan Smith returns from a shoulder injury to provide the playmaking punch the Wildcats sorely lacked last season. Smith and Brad Phillips form an experienced tandem at safety, while junior cornerback Sherrick McManis should benefit from an inconsistent first season as the starter. If Justan Vaughn or a redshirt freshman (Jordan Mabin, Michael Bolden) solidify the other corner spot, Northwestern should be respectable. 

10. Indiana --  Leading tackler Austin Thomas returns at strong safety, but cornerback is the biggest question on the team. The Hoosiers lost both starting corners, including all-conference performer Tracy Porter, who ranked second in the league with six interceptions. Six players are in the mix for the two jobs, including senior Chris Phillips. If the cornerback spot is stabilized, Indiana should leapfrog several teams. 

11. Minnesota -- The personnel is there for a turnaround, but it's tough to rank the Gophers much higher without seeing junior-college transfers Tramaine Brock, Trae Simmons and Simoni Lawrence. If those players perform like coach Tim Brewster thinks they will, Minnesota will be much improved. Brock brings a much-needed edge to the back four. But the Gophers can't rely much on returning players after last season's disaster.  

SPONSORED HEADLINES