Big Ten: Ted Ginn


Darrell Hazell's job requires him to evaluate all of Purdue's players, but he knows some position groups better than others.

Before taking his first head-coaching position at Kent State after the 2010 season, Hazell coached wide receivers at five different schools: Eastern Illinois, Western Michigan, Army, Rutgers and Ohio State, where he worked with the Buckeyes' wideouts from 2004-2010. Hazell also was an all-conference wide receiver at Muskingum University, where he still holds team records for career receptions (132) and receiving yards (1,966).

After coaching standouts such as Santonio Holmes, DeVier Posey and Anthony Gonzalez, Hazell can spot a potentially great receiver faster than most. He sees one in DeAngelo Yancey.

"He's the guy in the room that's different from everyone else," Hazell recently told ESPN.com. "We need to get him to play different than everyone else. He can be a very special guy."

Yancey had a somewhat special freshman year despite Purdue's struggles. He led the Boilers with 546 receiving yards, 206 more than any teammate. Yancey twice eclipsed 100 receiving yards in Big Ten games and was responsible for two of Purdue's three longest plays from scrimmage before the offense ignited in the finale against Indiana.

Only six other FBS freshmen averaged more receiving yards than Yancey in 2013. But he can do so much more.

"He's arguably one of the best players on the field every single time he's out there," Purdue quarterback Austin Appleby said. "He's just got to play like it every single time. That speaks to his maturation. He's still very young, but that doesn’t matter.

"We all know how talented he is."

[+] EnlargeDeAngelo Yancey
AP Photo/Gene J PuskarDeAngelo Yancey led Purdue in receiving yards as a freshman.
Yancey recognizes what others see in him. He knows he has to bring it out more this season for a Purdue offense that ranked last in the Big Ten in points and yards (119th nationally in both categories).

Several weeks ago, Hazell gave Yancey some practice tape from Hazell's time at Ohio State. Yancey watched players such as Posey and Ted Ginn go through the same drills and work on the same concepts as he is this spring.

Hazell doesn't often bring up his time at Ohio State, so there was a purpose when he did.

"He sent those guys to the league," Yancey said, "and ultimately that's where I want to go."

Hazell thinks Yancey is similar to some of his former Buckeyes wideouts.

"He's got size, he's got speed, he's got quickness, he's got the ability to catch around people," Hazell said.

An Atlanta native, Yancey initially committed to Kentucky but switched to Purdue last January after feeling unwanted by the new UK coaching staff. The 6-foot-2 wideout showed up to campus at around 200 pounds but quickly added 20 to his frame.

It took time to adjust to the extra weight, but Yancey felt comfortable running by the end of the season. It also took time to adjust to the responsibility placed on his shoulders.

"I was [surprised] early during the season, but once the season started progressing on, I embraced the role," he said. "When the big plays were needed, I took it upon myself to try and make them."

Yancey's Year 2 goals include more yards after the catch and being a leader.

"When I first came here, I wouldn't say stuff, or I would think they already have that leader position," he said. "But we've established if you're going to be a leader, make sure you're doing leader things, no matter what year you are."

One of those things is film study, which Yancey is doing more of this offseason. Hazell wants the rising sophomore to gain greater confidence against press coverage.

"We can do things structurally and schematically to help him," Hazell said, "but you'd rather have him figure it out first, how to beat man-to-man coverage, whether you're stuck in the boundary, whether you're to the field."

When he figures it out, look out.

"You'll see as time goes on, he's going to be huge for us," Appleby said. "We've just got to keep working every single day to get that killer mindset, that killer instinct to go get it. Because it's going to be one on one when the game is on the line, and everybody in the stadium is going to know who's getting the ball, and he's got to make a play."

Big Ten all-BCS-era team

January, 13, 2014
Jan 13
10:00
AM ET
The BCS is dead. RIP. As we memorialize the BCS era throughout ESPN.com today, we're selecting All-BCS teams from each conference. As a reminder, the BCS era lasted from the 1998 season through the recently completed 2013 season. To narrow our selections a bit, players had to play at least two seasons in the BCS era to be eligible. Nebraska players are part of our list even though the Huskers played in the Big 12 until 2011.

Here's our Big Ten All-BCS team.

Coach: Jim Tressel, Ohio State -- Tressel led Ohio State to the 2002 national title, the Big Ten's only championship in the BCS era, as well as seven Big Ten titles (one vacated).

OFFENSE

QB: Drew Brees, Purdue (1997-2000) -- He led Purdue to the 2000 Big Ten championship and finished his career with league records for passing yards (11,792), touchdown passes (90), total offensive yards (12,693), completions (1,026), and attempts (1,678). Brees won the Maxwell Award in 2000.

RB: Ron Dayne, Wisconsin (1996-99) -- The 1999 Heisman Trophy winner set the NCAA's career rushing record with 6,397 yards (not including bowl games). He won all the major national individual awards in 1999 and became the first player to repeat as Rose Bowl MVP.

[+] EnlargeMontee Ball
Gregory Shamus/Getty ImagesMontee Ball had 39 TDs for Wisconsin in 2011.
RB: Montee Ball, Wisconsin (2009-2012) -- The man nicknamed "MoneyBall" tied Barry Sanders' NCAA single-season touchdowns record with 39 in 2011 and set the mark for career touchdowns with 83. He won the Doak Walker Award as the nation's top running back in 2012.

WR: Braylon Edwards, Michigan (2001-04) -- The Big Ten's most recent Biletnikoff Award winner holds the league record for career touchdown receptions (39) and ranks fourth in career receiving yards (3,541). He's the only Big Ten receiver to record 1,000 yards in three consecutive seasons.

WR: Lee Evans, Wisconsin (2000-03) -- Evans twice led the Big Ten in receiving yards, eclipsing 1,500 yards in 2001 before rebounding from an ACL tear to record 1,213 yards and 13 touchdowns in 2003.

TE: Dallas Clark, Iowa (1999-2002) -- Clark earned the John Mackey Award in 2002 after recording 43 receptions for 742 yards as Iowa went undefeated in the Big Ten.

OL: Greg Eslinger, Minnesota (2002-05) -- One of the more decorated Big Ten linemen in the BCS era, Eslinger won the Outland Trophy in 2005. He was a two-time first-team All-America selection and a three-time first-team All-Big Ten selection for one of the nation's top rushing offenses.

OL: Joe Thomas, Wisconsin (2003-06) -- Another Outland Trophy winner (2006), Thomas earned unanimous consensus All-America honors that year. He earned first-team All-Big Ten honors in each of his final two seasons and was the No. 3 overall pick in the 2007 NFL draft.

OL: Dominic Raiola, Nebraska (1998-2000) -- In 1998, Raiola became the first Nebraska freshman offensive lineman to start a game in seven years. He went on to earn the Rimington Trophy as the nation's top center, first-team All-Big 12 honors in his final two seasons and consensus first-team All-America honors in 2000.

OL: Robert Gallery, Iowa (1999-2003) -- Gallery claimed the Outland Trophy in 2003 as well as first-team All-America honors. He twice earned first-team All-Big Ten honors as the anchor of a nationally elite offensive line.

OL: Jake Long, Michigan (2003-07) -- Although Long didn't win the Outland, he twice earned consensus first-team All-America honors (unanimous selection in 2007) and twice earned Big Ten offensive lineman of the year honors (beating out Thomas in 2006). Long was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2008 NFL draft.

DEFENSE

DE: LaMarr Woodley, Michigan (2003-06) -- Woodley claimed the Rotary Lombardi Award in 2006 as the nation's top lineman. A first-team All-American that season, he finished his career with 10 forced fumbles, tied for seventh on the Big Ten's career list.

DE: Ryan Kerrigan, Purdue (2007-10) -- Unlike most of the men on this list, Kerrigan never played for any BCS bowl teams at Purdue but still had a remarkable career that ended with unanimous consensus first-team All-America honors in 2010. The Big Ten defensive player of the year tied the NCAA record for forced fumbles (14) and recorded 33.5 sacks and 57 tackles for loss.

DT: Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska (2005-09) -- The most dominant defender in recent years finished fourth in Heisman voting in 2009 (should have been higher) and earned several awards, including the Bednarik, Nagurski and Outland. Suh finished his career with 24 sacks, 57 tackles for loss, four interceptions, three forced fumbles and 41 quarterback hurries.

DT: Devon Still, Penn State (2008-11) -- Penn State produced a string of outstanding defensive tackles including Still, the Big Ten's defensive player of the year in 2011. Still earned consensus first-team All-America honors after recording 17 tackles for loss.

LB: James Laurinaitis, Ohio State (2005-08) -- Laurinaitis won major national awards in each of his final three seasons, including the Nagurski Trophy in 2006. The two-time Big Ten defensive player of the year became just the third Ohio State player to earn consensus All-America honors in three seasons.

LB: Paul Posluszny, Penn State (2003-06) -- Posluszny is one of only two players (Pat Fitzgerald) to twice win the Bednarik Award as the nation's top defender. He became the first Penn State linebacker to twice earn AP All-America honors.

LB: LaVar Arrington, Penn State (1997-99) -- A freakishly athletic linebacker at Linebacker U., Arrington twice earned first-team All-Big Ten honors and won the Bednarik and Butkus Awards as a junior in 1999. He was the No. 2 overall pick in the 2000 NFL draft.

CB: Jamar Fletcher, Wisconsin (1998-2000) -- Fletcher claimed the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation's top defensive back in 2000, won Big Ten defensive player of the year honors that year and was a three-time first-team all-conference selection. He's tied for fourth in league history with 21 career interceptions and holds the league record for interception return yards (459).

CB: Darqueze Dennard, Michigan State (2010-13) -- Dennard also claimed the Thorpe Award as he helped Michigan State to its first outright Big Ten title in 26 years and a Rose Bowl victory against Stanford. The two-time first-team All-Big Ten selection recorded 10 career interceptions and led the "No Fly Zone" Spartans secondary.

S: Tyrone Carter, Minnesota (1996-99) -- The only Big Ten safety to win the Thorpe Award, Carter also twice earned first-team All-Big Ten honors and earned unanimous All-America honors in 1999. He set the FBS record for career tackles by a defensive back with 528.

S: Mike Doss, Ohio State (1999-2002) -- A three-time first-team All-Big Ten selection, Doss earned unanimous consensus All-America honors in 2002 as Ohio State won the national title.

SPECIAL TEAMS

K: Mike Nugent, Ohio State (2001-04) -- Nugent won the Lou Groza Award as the nation's top kicker in 2004 and claimed consensus All-America honors in both 2002 and 2004. He holds the Big Ten record for consecutive made field goals with 24.

P: Brandon Fields, Michigan State (2003-06) -- His name is on the Big Ten's punter of the year award for a reason. Fields earned consensus All-America honors in 2004, earned first-team All-Big Ten honors three times and twice led the league in punting, tying for third in career average (45 ypp).

Returns: Ted Ginn, Ohio State (2004-06) and Steve Breaston, Michigan (2003-06) -- Ginn holds the Big Ten single-season records for kick return average (25.6 ypr) and career punt return touchdowns (6), while Breaston claims the league mark for career punt return yards (1,599) and is tied for third in punt return touchdowns (4).

It's tough enough putting together these teams for one season, much less 16 seasons. You can't please everyone, and many exceptional players didn't make the cut.

We decided to go with five offensive linemen rather than a center, two guards and two tackles, in order to recognize the best overall players in the trenches.

There was some debate for a second receiver alongside Michigan's Edwards, as the Big Ten hasn't exactly mass-produced superstars at the position. Several players had great seasons like Michigan State's Charles Rogers in 2002, but we put more stock into overall career output and went with Wisconsin's Evans, who led the league in receiving in 2001 and 2003.

Cornerback created some debate among Fletcher, Dennard and Ohio State's Malcolm Jenkins, also a Jim Thorpe Award winner. We faced another tough decision at safety between Ohio State's Doss and Iowa's Bob Sanders.

Surprisingly, the defensive tackle spot produced few bona-fide superstars. Nebraska's Suh, who played his entire career in the Big 12, was an obvious choice but a second choice proved to be tough.

Arguably the toughest choice came at kicker between Nugent and Iowa's Nate Kaeding. Both won Lou Groza Awards and set numerous records. We gave the nod to Nugent, but not by much.

Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg


Hit on all three choices last week. Let's see how I do this time around.

OFFENSE -- Iowa TE Tony Moeaki

Tight ends rarely qualify for this honor, but Moeaki's performance Saturday night against Michigan certainly merits the award. After missing the previous three games with an ankle injury and barely practicing, Moeaki recorded six receptions for 105 yards and two touchdowns. He hauled in scoring passes of 34 and 42 yards in Iowa's 30-28 win.

DEFENSE -- Minnesota LB Lee Campbell

The Gophers' linebackers have been tremendous this season, and Campbell turned in another masterpiece against Purdue. He recorded a game-high 11 tackles, including 1.5 for loss, and changed the game with an interception midway through the second quarter and returned the ball to the Purdue 2-yard line, setting up the go-ahead touchdown. Campbell also blocked a field goal attempt that teammate Traye Simmons returned to the end zone. Simmons, Wisconsin's O'Brien Schofield and Ohio State's Ross Homan and Kurt Coleman also merit mentions.

CO-SPECIAL TEAMS -- Ohio State WR Ray Small and Iowa K Daniel Murray

After Wisconsin closed to within eight points, Small gave Ohio State a comfortable cushion with a 96-yard kickoff return for a touchdown in the third quarter. It marked Ohio State's first kickoff returned for a touchdown since Ted Ginn in the 2007 BCS title game.

Murray connected on a career-high three field goals in the win over Michigan and likely would have hit a fourth if not for an Iowa penalty. After a chip shot in the first quarter, Murray connected from 40 and 41 yards out.

SPONSORED HEADLINES