Bruins: Stanley Cup appearances

The Cup is back in Boston

October, 4, 2011
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BOSTON -- The Stanley Cup arrives Tuesday afternoon at the Boston Harbor Hotel, the site of the Bruins' ring ceremony.





Ference 'flashes' Cup in North End

September, 5, 2011
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Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference promised ESPNBoston.com earlier this summer that he was going to "one-up" everyone with his day with the Stanley Cup.

On Monday, he delivered as a flash mob broke out in the streets of the North End in Boston, concluding with Ference bringing the Cup into the crowd.

Ference also visited the Spaulding Hospital for rehabilitation, then paraded it through the North End.

Check it out below:

The Stanley Cup is continuing its whirlwind tour with Bruins players, coaches, scouts and management, and last weekend it returned to the province of British Columbia -- where the 2010-11 Bruins hoisted the trophy for the first time at Rogers Arena in Vancouver on June 15.

Bruins president and Hall of Famer Cam Neely had his second day with the Cup after bringing it to Martha’s Vineyard on Aug. 10; Mark Recchi got a day with Lord Stanley for the third time in his career; and for the first time in his career, Milan Lucic spent the day with the Cup in his native Vancouver.

Neely took the Cup back to his native Maple Ridge, British Columbia, to “The Cam Neely Arena” as well as to his former home, where unfortunately for the current residents they weren’t there to greet the Stanley Cup. Probably the most special place he brought it to was Belcarra Regional Park in Port Moody and the spot in the Burrard Inlet where his parents’ ashes were spread.

For Recchi's day with the Cup, he brought it to Kamloops, the town he grew up in and where he is part owner of a WHL team, the Kamloops Blazers. Recchi made sure to stop at the Royal Inland Hospital, where he was born. Over the last six months, Recchi has led the RIH Foundation's efforts to raise $3 million toward renovations for the Intensive Care Unit. Recchi held a $500-a-head luncheon to raise money for the cause and so far the foundation has collected more than $2 million. Recchi also spent some time with the Kamloops Mounted Patrol and took pictures in front of an old family home along the Kamloops Heritage Railway. He finished his day off at a private gathering at his parents’ house.

“Great time,” Recchi told ESPNBoston.com on Thursday. “It never gets old, I’ll tell you that. And to seal off my final season with another one of these days is just incredible.”

Vancouver native Milan Lucic became the only Bruin to hoist the Cup a second time in that city, taking the trophy on a lunch cruise in the harbor there with family and friends.

Lucic also paid homage to his family roots, taking the Stanley Cup to the Serbian Cultural Center.

"First I took it to the Serbian Cultural Center here, where the church is and I saw folks there," Lucic told NHL.com. "I took it there because it's obviously a pretty good support group I get from ... the Serbian people here. We have a pretty strong group [in Vancouver] and this year has been a pretty good year for us. I won the Stanley Cup, Peja Stojakovic won the NBA championship and Novak Djokovic is doing what he's doing in tennis. So it's been a good year for us, so I thought that'd be a pretty good idea."

Lucic enjoyed every second of his day with Lord Stanley.

"Everyone here has supported me from when I was a kid and, you know what, I feel like one of the luckiest players in the NHL because I have the support group that I do," Lucic told NHL.com. "It's a great group here today and the thing I wanted to do was share the day with them. I'm happy I've been able to do that. I just wish it would never end."

The Stanley Cup was scheduled to visit Shane Hnidy (Neepawa, Manitoba) and Johnny Boychuk (Edmonton, Alberta) and then head back east to Tim Thomas (Flint, Mich. and Burlington, Vt.) Adam McQuaid (Prince Edward Island) Michael Ryder (Newfoundland) Brad Marchand (Halifax, Nova Scotia) and Andrew Ference (Boston).

Video: Lucic brings Cup back to Vancouver

August, 14, 2011
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Milan Lucic had his day with the Stanley Cup, bringing the chalice to his native Vancouver, where, of course, his hometown Canucks lost to the Bruins in the Cup finals.

Lucic kept his celebration low key, reportedly, in part, because of some lingering ill will among some in Vancouver.

Bergeron, Chiarelli, Julien enjoy Cup time

August, 10, 2011
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The Stanley Cup's journey through Ontario ended last week, making a stop in Ottawa for visits with Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli and Claude Julien, both natives of the Ottawa area, as well as director of amateur scouting Wayne Smith and Ottawa-based scouts Mike Chiarelli and Jack Higgins. The Cup then was shipped to Quebec City for Patrice Bergeron’s day, and then south to Atlantic City for Dennis Seidenberg’s day.

Seidenberg, who resides in south Jersey during the summer, brought the Cup to a local arena and out in the harbor, then held a private party at Caesars Atlantic City, where he and friends were able to drink champagne from the oldest bottle of champagne (1729) in the world out of the oldest sports trophy, the Stanley Cup. As Seidenberg told ESPNBoston.com late Wednesday afternoon, all of the ancient bubbly didn't find its intended target.

[+] EnlargeDennis Seidenberg
AP PhotoDennis Seidenberg, who brought the Stanley Cup to Caesars Atlantic City, enjoys a drink from the sacred chalice.
“It was pretty funny because we’re drinking the oldest champagne in the world and my buddy spilled it all over himself when he was drinking out of the Stanley Cup,” Seidenberg said. “We had a great time though. It was a busy but fun time.”

This past weekend, Patrice Bergeron had two days with the Stanley Cup in historic Quebec City, where he grew up cheering for the Nordiques and hoping to one day to hoist the Cup. Bergeron brought the Cup to his alma mater, Seminaire Saint-Francois, where the players on the school's midget AAA team unexpectedly got to pose with him and the Stanley Cup.

"We went to ... my old midget AAA team that I played for one year when I was 16 years old, and it's pretty much where it all started for me -- all the goals and big dreams of one day playing in the NHL -- so I wanted to give that opportunity to them,” Bergeron told the Bruins' website. "I called the organization and I told them I don’t want any kids to know about it, and that I wanted them to be surprised over it and it worked. Their reaction was fun."

He also visited a local children’s hospital and hoisted the silver chalice in front of an estimated 1,000 people at Espace 400e Bell in the Port du Quebec.

Chiarelli got to have his day with Lord Stanley on his 47th birthday (Aug. 5).

"At my uncle's place, there was a birthday party and they brought out a cake there at the end," Chiarelli told bostonbruins.com. "And then we went to the Marshes Golf and Country Club where my wife and I invited friends for a small gathering ... and there was another birthday cake there.”

Chiarelli also brought the Cup to his alma mater, the University of Ottawa Law School, the Nepean Corona School of Gymnastics where his wife and daughter both trained, and as any good Canadian would, to a local Tim Horton’s.

Coach Claude Julien also was able to spend some quality time with family, friends and the Cup, but he made sure to take the trophy to a spot it had visited before.

"We just started off the morning and took the Cup across the street to the Rideau Canal," Julien told Bostonbruins.com. "We wanted to get a little family picture with [daughter] Katryna and [wife] Karen and myself with us by the canal, and with the Parliament building in the background. It was pretty neat because the first time that Cup was won by the Ottawa Senators one of the players ended up throwing it into the canal. From what I hear the coach ended up having to fish it out. That’s probably something pretty unique, but that’s something that happened there, so I was right next to the canal where that happened."

The Stanley Cup is continuing its travels this week and still will have days with Tim Thomas (Flint, Mich.), Mark Recchi (Kamloops, British Columbia, Milan Lucic (Vancouver), Shane Hnidy (Neepawa, Manitoba) and Johnny Boychuk (Edmonton) before coming back east to be with Adam McQuaid (Prince Edward Island), Brad Marchand (Halifax, Nova Scotia), Michael Ryder (Newfoundland) and Andrew Ference (Boston).

Seguin preparing for day with Cup

July, 26, 2011
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The Stanley Cup is headed back to North America and set to begin a seven-stop tour through Ontario, including Tyler Seguin’s hometown of Brampton. James Cybulski of TSN.ca caught up with Seguin recently to find out what the Bruins’ 19 year-old forward plans to do on his day with Lord Stanley.

“Got to finalize all that this week, right now looks like I'm going to do something in Brampton, the mayor called and wants to do something around the town, from there I'll probably do something at Westwood Arena because I played Greater Toronto Hockey League there, then hopefully have a chance to stop off at a hospital and then have a pig roast with my family and my close friends,” Seguin told Cybulski. “It's going to be nice, I haven't been there actually since - I don't even know, may have been before the OHL. It's going to be nice there and hopefully a lot fans and young hockey players will come out and see the Stanley Cup.”

Here’s the remaining players that are yet to have their day with the Stanley Cup:

Shawn Thornton: Oshawa, Ontario
Daniel Paille: Welland, Ontario
Rich Peverley: Guelph, Ontario
Gregory Campbell: Tillsonburg, Ontario
Tyler Seguin: Brampton, Ontario
Marc Savard: Peterborough, Ontario
Chris Kelly: Ottawa, Ontario
Patrice Bergeron: Quebec City, Quebec
Mark Recchi: Kamloops, British Columbia
Milan Lucic: Vancouver, British Columbia
Shane Hnidy: Neepawa, Manitoba
Johnny Boychuk: Edmonton, Alberta
Adam McQuaid: Prince Edward Island
Brad Marchand: Nova Scotia
Michael Ryder: Newfoundland
Tim Thomas: Flint, Mich.
Dennis Seidenberg: Atlantic City, NJ
Andrew Ference: Boston, Mass.

Stanley Cup making its way around Europe

July, 22, 2011
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The Stanley Cup made its way through the Czech Republic and Slovakia on Wednesday and Thursday as former Bruins defenseman Tomas Kaberle (Kladno, Czech Republic), Bruins center David Krejci (Sternberk, Czech Republic) and captain Zdeno Chara (Trencin, Slovakia) got their days with the Cup.

Kaberle -- now a member of the Carolina Hurricanes after signing a three-year deal with them July 6 -- had a rather peculiar welcome from the mayor of his hometown when he was presented a sword and shield and greeted by a “Hello Piggy” band (see below).



Meanwhile, Krejci got to celebrate with his family and friends:



Chara was greeted with a statue of himself that will stand in a local children’s hospital and be auctioned off to help the young children.

“I didn’t know about it until a few days ago and to have a statue…it’s kind of, I really don’t know if I deserve it yet,” Chara told NHL.com. “It’s something that usually it’s made for people who are absolute legends and I don’t know if I’m in that category. But again, obviously it’s an honor and I’m just glad that it’s going to be auctioned off and the money is going to be used for children with different sicknesses.”

Chara also got to eat his favorite treat “rice cake” out of the Cup.



So far, only one Bruins player, Nathan Horton, has had his day with the Cup in North America. But that almost didn’t happen as Lord Stanley showed up late for a Stanley Cup parade in Dunnville, Ontario. The Stanley Cup did not make it’s flight from Boston to Buffalo prior to the parade.

The Stanley Cup is next scheduled to visit Savonlinna, Finland, the hometown of goaltender Tuukka Rask before heading back to North America and a seven-stop tour through Ontario. Here’s the latest list of where the Stanley Cup still has to travel:

Tuukka Rask: Savonlinna, Finland
Shawn Thornton: Oshawa, Ontario
Daniel Paille: Welland, Ontario
Rich Peverley: Guelph, Ontario
Gregory Campbell: Tillsonburg, Ontario
Tyler Seguin: Brampton, Ontario
Marc Savard: Peterborough, Ontario
Chris Kelly: Ottawa, Ontario
Patrice Bergeron: Quebec City, Quebec
Mark Recchi: Kamloops, British Columbia
Milan Lucic: Vancouver, British Columbia
Shane Hnidy: Neepawa, Manitoba
Johnny Boychuk: Edmonton, Alberta
Adam McQuaid: Prince Edward Island
Brad Marchand: Nova Scotia
Michael Ryder: Newfoundland
Tim Thomas: Flint, Mich.

Keeping tabs on the Cup

July, 6, 2011
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The Stanley Cup’s summer tour has begun, with each player, coach and staff member of the Bruins getting at least one day with hockey’s Holy Grail before training camp begins in Europe.

Here are some of the details on where the Cup has been and where it’s headed, courtesy of the Canadian Press:

• Bruins owner Jeremy Jacobs took the Cup to Yosemite National Park in California over the weekend before passing it on to assistant coach Doug Houda, who brought it to Whitefish, Mont., on Tuesday.

• Nathan Horton, whose Game 3 season-concussion proved to be an inspiration to the team for the Stanley Cup finals, will be the first player to get his day with the Cup. He will host the trophy in mid-July in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

• After Florida, the Cup will go on a tour of Europe, with Tomas Kaberle (Kladno, Czech Republic) , David Krejci (Sternbeck, Czech Republic) and Zdeno Chara (Trencin, Slovakia) getting their time with it before sending it off to Savonlinna, Finland, where Tuukka Rask will get his day.

[+] EnlargeStanley Cup
AP Photo/Paul LesterThe Stanley Cup spent the Fourth of July holiday on the 18th tee at Pebble Beach.
• From there, the Cup will head back to North America, stopping at various locales in Ontario at the end of July. Shawn Thornton (Oshawa), Dan Paille (Welland), Rich Peverley (Guelph), Gregory Campbell (Tillsonburg), Tyler Seguin (Brampton), Marc Savard (Peterborough) and Chris Kelly (Ottawa) will all get their time with it on its Ontario tour.

• After Ontario, the Stanley Cup will head to seven other Canadian provinces throughout August. Patrice Bergeron (Quebec City), Mark Recchi (Kamloops) and Milan Lucic (Vancouver) will bring it to British Columbia, Shane Hnidy will get it in Neepawa, Manitoba, Johnny Boychuk will take it to Edmonton, Adam McQuaid will get it on Prince Edward Island, Brand Marchand will have it in Nova Scotia and Michael Ryder will host the Cup in Labrador.

• Somewhere along the way, the Cup will stop in Flint, Mich., where Conn Smythe winner Tim Thomas will spend the first of his two days with the Cup. He has previously said he’d also like to take the Cup to Vermont, where he played college hockey.

Throughout the summer, the Hockey Hall of Fame will chronicle where the Cup has been and where it's going in this journal.

Zdeno Chara says bar tab being exaggerated

June, 23, 2011
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There has been a lot of talk over the Boston Bruins' $156,679.74 bar tab, but captain Zdeno Chara said the team's actual tab wasn't even close to what is being reported.

[+] EnlargeZdeno Chara
Bruce Bennett/Getty Images"All I have to say is we are very disappointed that something like this is coming out that is not true," Zdeno Chara said of reports over the Bruins' bar tab.
"That number that is posted up is nowhere near what the actual price of the bill was," Chara said Tuesday at media availability before the NHL awards in Las Vegas. "All I have to say is we are very disappointed that something like this is coming out that is not true."

The Bruins spent Saturday night at Shrine nightclub at Foxwoods Casino in Mashantucket, Conn. According to reports, the biggest ticket item on the bill was a $100,000 bottle of Ace of Spades "Midas" champagne. The 30-liter bottle was one of six in existence and was double the size of the 15-liter Ace of Spades brut that Mavericks owner Mark Cuban bought his team after their NBA title last week.

Chara said the owners gave the Bruins the bottle of champagne as a gift with the understanding the Bruins would be signing the bottle and auctioning it off.

"We had been given as a gift the bottle of champagne from Foxwoods and we knew after when we finished with it we would sign it and Foxwoods would auction it off," said Chara.

"Obviously we are very disappointed at something like this. I'm not sure how it got out. That was our first and only night we had as a team together. We went out to Foxwoods to have a normal good time, nothing crazy. We started the night bowling and having some snacks, then we moved to the bar and basically had a night out.”

Shawn Thornton said on The Sports Hub's Felger and Massarotti radio show that the owners of Shrine nightclub were very generous.

"There's no doubt about it. We partied like we won the Stanley Cup but it wasn't like Mr. Chara and his $7.6 million just pulled out the black card and said 'Here, it's on me,' so it wasn't as bad as it sounds."

According to reports, the bill also included a $24,869.80 built-in tip, 35 Jager Bombs ($525), three bottles of Captain Morgan ($900), nine bottles of Goose MG ($5,400) and 67 bottles of Fiji water ($268).

Information from ESPN.com's Scott Burnside was used in this report.

Thomas loses beard, keeps mustache

June, 20, 2011
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ThomasAP Photo/Michael Dwyer
Goalie Tim Thomas was the last of the Bruins to shave off his playoff beard, doing so today for charity at Gillette's world shaving headquarters in South Boston. He did, however, keep his mustache.

"Everyone says I look 10 years younger, which my wife will be happy about,” Thomas told the Scott Van Pelt Show on ESPN Radio shortly after the shave (listen to the interview HERE). I kept the mustache because my oldest daughter loves it. I'm ready for the awards in Vegas on Wednesday."

Thomas, who is likely to secure his second Vezina Trophy at the NHL awards ceremony on Wednesday night, also said he thought this Cup victory would inspire a generation of Bostonians to play and watch hockey.

"I'm so happy for the city,” Thomas said. "I've been here a long time. I've been here where there was 9,000 fans at a home-opening game here 5 or 6 years ago. I was always told that Boston is a hockey city. I know there are these other sports and the fans love them too.

“Because of the ‘70 and ‘72 championships there's a whole generation of people that are huge hockey fans. Over the past few years I’ve seen it grow. It went from not seeming to be all that popular to all of a sudden I started to see the kids out in the street with the hockey nets playing hockey all the time because we were getting better. Now that we won the championship, hopefully we can develop a whole other generation of hockey fans and hockey players.

“The Bruins won the championship in ‘70 and ‘72. On the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team about half of them were from the Boston area and I think that was a result of those Bruins championships. Hopefully with us winning the Stanley Cup this year it inspires a whole new generation of kids to play hockey. We might be seeing the benefits in some Olympic games 10 or 15 years from now."

To see the transformation, check out the video below:

What B's players plan to do with the Cup

June, 20, 2011
6/20/11
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Milan LucicGail Oskin/Getty ImagesMilan Lucic plans on bringing the Cup to his hometown of Vancouver. That shouldn't be too painful for Canucks fans.
BOSTON -- The Stanley Cup will return to Vancouver, British Columbia, at some point this summer.

While Canucks fans probably won’t be too happy about that, Bruins forward Milan Lucic and his family and friends will be pumped to host, and hoist, the Cup in his hometown of Vancouver.

“I’ve definitely thought about it. I was thinking about taking it back to my high school and maybe the rink I started playing hockey,” Lucic said Sunday. “I’ll also take it up Grouse Mountain. It’ll be really cool to take a picture up there overlooking the city. Obviously, I’ll spend some time with it with my family. It’s going to be crazy, but we have to enjoy it for ourselves.

“My parents are more than excited. It almost got personal in the end because we were playing the Canucks and my parents were getting a lot of heat from coworkers, but they’re obviously excited we were able to win, and I was able to win. When I do have my day, it’ll be a special time. It’s something we’ve really worked hard for.”

Sticking with tradition, each Bruins player, coach and trainer will get an allotted day with the Stanley Cup this offseason to do with as he pleases. The NHL will soon set up a schedule of who gets the Cup when after the players all submit their request for when they’d like to have it. Other people associated with the organization can petition to get it for a day, as well.

Here’s what some Bruins have planned for their allotted time with the Cup:

• Tim Thomas: "It'll be going to Flint, Michigan. I've had a lot of family and friends that have been supporting me for a long time. I want to reward them by sharing the Cup with them for a day. Possibly I may get it for a second day. If that’s the case, I may be able to share it with a whole other group of people, [possibly in Vermont]."

• Andrew Ference: "I'm locked in to have it here in Boston in the North End. It's like planning a wedding though. I batted it back and forth about going home where I grew up or where I've spent the summers the last few years. You know, honestly it means more to have it here. We've made our home here. It almost feels like a vacation when we go back to Canada. The girls, they're in school, so we have tons of friends outside of hockey in the neighborhood. It means a lot to the people in the city."

• Claude Julien: “Well I started thinking about it. And the biggest thing that comes to mind, you want to share it. It’s not mine it’s ours. I think our fans here know that by now. Same thing when you bring it home, there are so many people that made an impact in your life. And there are some people who are deserving of seeing it. You look for the best charity you can at that point and try to share it with them. But it will certainly be with that and people who have had an impact on your life. So I will certainly make the best of it. And that’s one thing I will take time to plan carefully and do it the best I can.”

• David Krejci: “Yeah, I’m going to go home to my hometown [in the Czech Republic] and share it with my family, my friends and a few other people back home.”

• Tyler Seguin: “Yeah, it’s tough to say right now. I haven’t been trying to think about it at all because I knew I was going to jinx it so right now, I have in mind, just taking it to the rink where I learned to play hockey, which was, you know, I think I’ll do something there. And maybe just bring it around Toronto.”

• Shawn Thornton: “No, [don’t have any plans for my day with the Cup,] not yet. I haven’t thought about much in the last three days, I’m not going to lie to you. It’s been a rough one.”

• Patrice Bergeron: “I’ve thought about a couple of things but it’s still something I need to think about and it’s going to be a special day, that’s for sure. I’ll share it with my family and friends but I’m not sure exactly what I’ll do all day.”

• Tomas Kaberle: “Yeah, I got a pretty good idea. I would bring it home where I grew up playing hockey [in the Czech Republic] to share it with my friends and closest family. And I’m sure it’s going to be a nice day at the village where I live.”

• Zdeno Chara: “I haven’t yet [decided what I’ll do on my day with the Cup]. Obviously we were quite busy with the things we were doing over here but I’ll put more thought into it.”

• Tuukka Rask: “I’m just going to have a family day. Just keep it in the family and a couple friends, that’s about it. I don’t want to do anything too crazy with it. Just show it to the family and friends and stay quiet.”

• Rich Peverley: “I’m just going to take it back to my hometown [in Ontario] and I think maybe spend a little personal time with it and maybe go out and have fun with friends.”

• Adam McQuaid: “Take it back home, obviously. I’m not sure of the exact details, but there are a lot of things I’d like to do with it but I don’t have enough time to do everything.”

• Johnny Boychuk: “I have no clue yet. I have no clue at all. I haven’t even thought about it, well I thought about it, but I just don’t know what I’m going to do.”

What would you do with the Cup if you had it for a day? Let us know in the comments section of this blog entry.

Bruins celebrate with $100K bottle of bubbly

June, 20, 2011
6/20/11
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Bruins Drink From CupBryan SpinelliShawn Thornton drinks from the super-size $100K bottle of bubbly while Zdeno Chara sips from the Stanley Cup.
The Stanley Cup champion Bruins had one hell of a weekend.

On Saturday morning, they were feted by an estimated 1 million fans on the streets of Boston. And on Sunday, they were at Fenway Park to be honored by the Red Sox. Now, we find out that in between those events, they headed down I-95 to Foxwoods Resort and Casino to celebrate at the Shrine lounge and nightclub and the High Rollers lounge.

Apparently, most of the team went from the victory parade on to Foxwoods, where they racked up a bill of more than $150,000 at Shrine, whose owners presented the team with a 30-liter bottle of Ace of Spades “Midas” champagne, which retails for more than $100,000 per bottle. (According to one account, Brad Marchand stood atop the bar at Shrine at one point and showered the crowd with the expensive bubbly.)

The bottle is (was?) one of six in existence and is double the size of the 15-liter Ace of Spades brut that Mavericks owner Mark Cuban bought his team after their NBA title last week.

The Bruins’ bottle was signed by every Bruins player in attendance Saturday night and will be on display at High Rollers. It will be raffled off at a later date to benefit the Bruins Foundation.

After staying at Foxwoods overnight, the Bruins got a police escort to Fenway Park to throw out Sunday’s first pitch.

A hell of a weekend, indeed.
BOSTON -- The celebrations just keep going for the Bruins.

On Saturday, they were toasted by the city in one of the the largest rolling rally duck boat parades the city has had, then on Sunday afternoon they brought the Stanley Cup out on the field at Fenway Park and all got to throw out the first pitches prior to the Red Sox's 12-3 win over the Brewers.

The players then met the media for one last time and had their exit interviews with general manager Peter Chiarelli and coach Claude Julien.

“It was awesome. What a time!” forward Shawn Thornton said. “I never thought I’d get to do that in my life, so it was great. We got to go into the room, we got to see the boys beforehand and stuff. It was pretty cool.”

Thornton and his teammates also got to check out the Red Sox dressing room and meet the players, who wished them congratulations and got their chance to meet Lord Stanley's Cup.

"They’re getting ready for a game, so we didn’t want to take too much time away from them," Thornton said, "but they were pretty happy to get some pictures and stuff with the trophy.”

For winger Nathan Horton, who also got to throw the first pitch at Fenway last June following his trade to the Bruins from Florida, this experience was even better, adding another chapter to what has been an amazing first season in Black and Gold.

“Back then I didn’t know what to expect,” Horton said. “I hadn’t been anywhere else. But having been here all year and experienced it, I just had so much fun and literally since I got here I haven’t stopped smiling because I’ve had a lot of fun and I’ve really enjoyed it. I love being a Boston Bruin and obviously, being in this organization with such great people we have, that just makes it even better.”

The Bruins have been overwhelmed by the outpouring of love from their fans, and while it’s been a whirlwind last few days, they’re enjoying every moment.

“The parade yesterday was awesome and being at the Red Sox today was nearly as awesome,” goalie Tim Thomas said. “So that has exceeded my expectations. So far it’s been incredibly busy though, and I’m incredibly tired from the playoffs already [laughs], and I’m looking forward to just getting some rest.”

Thornton called the experience a “blur.”

“A blur. It’s been a blur, it’s been fun,” Thornton said. “The city, that parade was awesome. I mean I expected a lot of people but I didn’t expect people would be rammed in there and be that loud, like screaming the whole time. It was good.”

Lord Stanley takes the rubber

June, 19, 2011
6/19/11
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Bruins at FenwayBob DeChiara/US PresswireZdeno Chara shows off the Stanley Cup to the crowd at Fenway Park.
BOSTON -- While the Stanley Cup was proudly placed on the pitching rubber by captain Zdeno Chara, the champion Bruins picked out a partner from the Red Sox and launched nearly two dozen ceremonial pitches toward home plate Sunday afternoon, baseballs flying everywhere, to cap a pregame ceremony played out before a roaring crowd at Fenway Park.

The Sox tribute to the Bruins did not end when the game began. The foghorn that sounds when the Bruins score a goal was played repeatedly during a six-run Sox rally in the first inning.

The Bruins, who visited with Sox players in the clubhouse before the game, rode in four duck boats that emerged from the center-field wall and made a lap of the field. Then the players, led by Chara with the Cup hoisted high overhead, walked in collectively from the outfield, the applause building to a crescendo as they reached the mound.

“It was awesome. What a time!” forward Shawn Thornton said. “I never thought I’d get to do that in my life, so it was great. We got to go into the room, we got to see the boys beforehand and stuff. It was pretty cool.”

Thornton and his teammates also got to check out the Red Sox dressing room and meet the players, who wished them congratulations and got their chance to meet Lord Stanley's Cup.

"They’re getting ready for a game, so we didn’t want to take too much time away from them," Thornton said, "but they were pretty happy to get some pictures and stuff with the trophy.”

The Bruins have been overwhelmed by the outpouring of love from their fans, and while it’s been a whirlwind the last few days, they’re enjoying every moment.

“The parade yesterday was awesome and being at the Red Sox today was nearly as awesome,” goalie Tim Thomas said. “So that has exceeded my expectations. So far it’s been incredibly busy though, and I’m incredibly tired from the playoffs already [laughs], and I’m looking forward to just getting some rest.”

Thornton called the experience a “blur.”

“A blur. It’s been a blur, it’s been fun,” Thornton said. “The city, that parade was awesome. I mean I expected a lot of people but I didn’t expect people would be rammed in there and be that loud, like screaming the whole time. It was good.”

Check out a few more images of the pregame fun:

BruinsAP Photo/Michael DwyerThe Bruins, most clad in Red Sox caps, soak in the adulation at Fenway.
BruinsJim Rogash/Getty ImagesBlack and Gold meets Green as a duck boat of Bruins passes in front of the Monster.
BruinsJim Rogash/Getty ImagesCup-carrying Zdeno Chara leads the Bruins across the outfield grass to throw the first pitches.

Snapshots: Scenes from Bruins' parade

June, 18, 2011
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BOSTON -- A few photos from today's Bruins victory parade ...

Duck Boat AP Photo/Bizuayehu TesfayeThe duck boats made their way through Boston as hundreds of fans cheered them on.
Bruins FansAP Photo/Charles KrupaFor many fans, Saturday's victory parade was 39 years in the making.
Bruins FansAP Photo/Winslow TownsonBoston Bruins fans cheer from on top of a bus stop in Copley Square.
Bruins FansAP Photo/Bizuayehu TesfayeConfetti lined the parade route as the duck boats passed by.
Zdno CharaAP Photo/Charles KrupaZdno Chara gave fans near the TD Garden a taste of the Cup before the parade.
Brad MarchandAP Photo/Bizuayehu TesfayeCult hero Brad Marchand hoists the Cup during Saturday's parade.
Zedno CharaAP Photo/Charles KrupaZdeno Chara takes the Cup off of his duck boat to give fans a closer look at the hockey hardware.
Zedno CharaAP Photo/Charles KrupaTim Thomas (Conn Smythe) and Zdeno Chara (Stanley Cup) show off their hardware.
Claude JulienGreg M. Cooper/US PresswireAt the pre-parade rally, Claude Julien thanked his fellow Boston coaches -- Terry Francona, Bill Belichick and Doc Rivers -- for their support.
Marc SavardAP Photo/Winslow TownsonMarc Savard said it was a "weird feeling" watching his teammates win the Stanley Cup from afar.
Bruins FansChris Forsberg/ESPNBoston.comFans flooded the area around the Garden hours before the parade.

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