Why increased cap could help C's

April, 21, 2014
Apr 21
4:00
PM ET
The NBA's salary cap looks like it's going up. From ESPN.com's Marc Stein:
The NBA has informed teams that it is projecting a rise in the salary cap of nearly $5 million for next season ... Sources told ESPN.com that all 30 teams were informed this week via league memorandum that an increase in the cap from this season's $58.6 million to $63.2 million in 2014-15 -- thanks to increased revenues -- is now expected. A corresponding rise in the luxury-tax threshold from $71.7 million to $77 million is also projected, sources said.

The benefit here is obvious: Teams are going to have more money to spend. You'll hear plenty about how star-craving teams believe this will help them in pursuit of players like Carmelo Anthony.

But how does it help the Boston Celtics?

The first thing that jumped to mind is the added flexibility it gives the Celtics in terms of signing someone like restricted free agent Avery Bradley. Sure, it could also drive up his price tag if another team was willing to use that newfound cash to help offer Bradley an inflated salary. What seems more likely is that the Celtics can more easily stomach a reasonable number, one that might have originally left them a bit leery due to cap and tax ramifications.

Like anything, the Celtics cannot be irresponsible with an increased budget and they shouldn't overpay for any player just because of available cash. It simply makes it a little easier to digest slightly higher numbers, especially since veteran contract values will climb across the league by introducing $150 million in potential spending next season.

The other benefit is that some of those contracts in the middle of Boston's payroll structure -- say Brandon Bass at $6.9 million -- might look a little more attractive if teams have deeper pockets to add complementary talent.

With CBA guru Larry Coon noting that the cap is projected to grow to $66.5 million for the 2015-16 season, there's simply more money for teams to play with, all while most salaries, like minimum and rookie deals, remain locked in until the next CBA negotiations.

Teams like Boston, which has a surplus of draft picks over the next five seasons, have an ability to lock in young talent at bargain rates and that could put them in position to be take advantage of that extra available income, especially with an ownership that has been committed to spending into the tax in order to field a contender.

Chris Forsberg

Celtics reporter, ESPNBoston.com

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TEAM LEADERS

POINTS
Jeff Green
PTS AST STL MIN
16.9 1.7 0.7 34.2
OTHER LEADERS
ReboundsJ. Sullinger 8.1
AssistsR. Rondo 9.8
StealsR. Rondo 1.3
BlocksB. Bass 0.9