Boston High School: Brandon Salway

New England Roundup: Maine

March, 27, 2013
3/27/13
6:54
PM ET
Martha Veroneau’s season was driven by one memory, and capped with a flashback to another.

MaineVeroneau was the star player on one of the most exciting teams in the state — the Waynflete girls, who won this year’s Class C state basketball title by defeating Calais in the final girls high school game ever at the Bangor Auditorium.

Although Veroneau set individual records in the 2012 tournament with 47 points and nine 3-pointers in a game, the Flyers lost to Hall-Dale in the regional final.

“Last year, after we lost in the regionals, everybody remembered sitting in the locker room and being so disappointed,” Veroneau said, “because we were so close.”

Veroneau was the major reason there were no such regrets this year. In five postseason games, she averaged 27.4 points, 7.6 rebounds, 5.6 assists, and 6.2 steals per game. She scored 19 points in the fourth quarter of the state final as Waynflete won by four.

“She’s the most impressive athlete I’ve ever coached — male or female,” said Waynflete coach Brandon Salway, who has also coached boys' basketball and soccer in his 24 years on the sidelines. “She raises the level of every team she’s plays on.”

The state final was Veroneau’s last high school game. She finished with 1,465 points and 186 3-pointers.

“She had the green light since she was a freshman — a bright green light,” Salway said.

Veroneau stands five-foot-six, but sometimes played the post on defense for Waynflete. On offense, the ball was in her hands as much as possible.

“She had tremendous ball-handling skills,” Salway said. “We really haven’t been pressed in four years. Teams try occasionally, but she was just able to break through the press with her speed and agility.”

Salways and Veroneau also brought up how much Veroneau enjoyed playing on this team with this group of girls. The Flyers got together recently in Salway’s office and watched the state championship game.

That night, things didn’t go so well for the Flyers for much of the game. Calais led 34-22 at the half, was up by as much as 14 in the third quarter, and still held a 44-36 lead after three quarters.

“I think we all could see [watching the game] that we were a little nervous to be on that stage,” Veroneau said. “Coach told me, ‘You’re better than this.’ I was shooting some way deep 3-pointers that I normally wouldn’t have, just because I was so nervous. I think I was trying too hard.”

The turning point, Salway said, was when tournament officials brought out the Gold Ball trophy and set it on the scorer’s table. Salway said Veroneau changed when she saw that, and Veroneau dominated the rest of the game, hitting several key free throws in the final two minutes.

It brought back memories of Veroneau growing up and shooting in her driveway, imagining that the state championship was in the balance and she was shooting the crucial foul shots.

“Those scenarios that I made up as a kid, I was actually in them,” Veroneau said. “It was just surreal.”

Salway said Veroneau has drawn a lot of attention from Division II and Division III schools, and there’s little doubt she’d be an impact player at the Division III level.

“At least one Division Three coach told me if she was his point guard next year, he’d be an NCAA tournament team the next four years,” Salway said.

The catch is that Veroneau won’t be anybody’s point guard next year. She’s headed to Boston College, she’s going to focus on nursing, and she won’t be playing sports.

“I just love the atmosphere there,” Veroneau said. “I’ve had second thoughts if that was the right call, because I’m missing basketball so much these past few weeks, but I think it will all work out.”

For Veroneau, it might be even tougher for her to realize that her high school basketball career is over.

“We had a great run at it,” she said. “We had memories together, and we had friendships that will last forever.”

CHAMPIONSHIP GAME STAR EYES TRANSFER
Only a couple weeks after leading Penquis Valley High School to the Class C boys’ basketball state title, Isaiah Bess made it public that he wants to transfer to Hampden Academy. The Broncos won the Class A state title this year.

Marc Calnan of Examiner.com originally reported that Bess was transferring, then later reported the same day that the transfer was unofficial.

“I think the move will help me in terms of education and will help me prepare for college in a few years,” Bess told Calnan. “I am definitely a people person so seeing 750 new faces which involves meeting new people will be fun for me, also experiencing new challenges every day. The sports seasons should also be a good time.”

MAGNUSSON RESIGNS AT CONY
After leading the Rams to the Class A state championship game in 2012 and the regional final from the No. 9 seed this winter, Cony girls’ basketball coach Karen Magnusson resigned. Magnusson and her husband, Travis, the boys’ basketball coach at Dirigo, are due to welcome their first child in August.

“I felt like I was choosing between my own kid and my basketball family,” Magnusson told the Kennebec Journal. “It hurt because I want to be there. It’s going to hurt until I have my baby then I want to spend time with my child. I want to be a great mom.”

Magnusson was a star player at Cony and then the University of Maine at Farmington. Even while Cony was making a run through the Eastern A tournament. she provided color commentary on television broadcasts of some games in other brackets.

Magnusson told the Kennebec Journal she plans to return to coaching in two of three years. Cony athletic director Paul Vachon added that Magnusson “can work for us anytime.”

New England Roundup: Maine

December, 17, 2012
12/17/12
8:08
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For most teams, the Maine high school basketball season began Dec. 7. Here’s a look at how the classes shape up

MaineClass A Boys: The West looks like a three-team race between Portland, Deering, and Bonny Eagle, with South Portland ready should there be an opening. Junior Justin Zukowski is Portland’s top all-around player, and he has help in Nick Volger and Jayvon Pitts-Young. Deering tries to beat you inside, with six-six Labson Abwoch, and six-four Thiwat Thiwat, both of whom are from the Sudan and moved to the United States at an early age.

Hampden was upset by Deering in the state final, and even though the Broncos return only two starters, they were still the pick for first place in Eastern A’s preseason coaches poll. Edward Little, Lawrence, and Bangor, all programs with strong traditions, could each challenge Hampden. Lawrence relies on forward Spencer Carey and guard Xavier Lewis, a transfer from Bangor.

Class A Girls: Western A has at least four strong teams in McAuley, Scarborough, Cheverus, and Deering. Oddly enough, none of them play each other until January. Point guard Allie Clement leads two-time defending state champion McAuley. Add in three six-footers and a talented guard in sophomore Olivia Dalphonse (a transfer from Bonny Eagle), and this team should go far in the tournament again.

In the East, Edward Little, Mt. Ararat, and Mt. Blue should fight it out for the top spot. Edward Little’s top scorer is guard Ashlee Arnold, and the Red Eddies have some motivation after blowing an 11-point halftime lead and losing to Cony in last winter’s regional final. Mt. Blue has balanced scoring, and guard Gabby Foy is a player who can run up a lot of points in a short time. Brewer was the big surprise in the early going, beating Mt. Blue on a three-pointer at the buzzer, then knocking off Lewiston the same way three nights later. Bangor has the height and athleticism to play with anyone, while Oxford Hills, Skowhegan, and Lawrence could be sleepers in a deep league.

Class B boys: Falmouth and York are two of the tallest and best teams in the West. York has five players six-four or taller; Falmouth has three at least six-five. Falmouth didn’t return any starters this season, but began the year with three lopsided wins. To go with York’s height, the Wildcats have senior guard Adam Bailey, who hit 11 three-pointers in York’s first four games this season.

Expectations are very high at Oceanside, which finished 12-8 last season but returns four starters and is loaded with height. The Portland Press Herald even said that, “Anything short of winning Eastern Class B would be a disappointment.” Winslow is expected to be a playoff team, but Oceanside beat the Black Raiders, 80-53, on opening night. Medomak Valley, Camden Hills, and possibly Caribou and Presque Isle will also look to get hot at the right time.

Class B girls: Defending regional champ Lake Region is probably the favorite again. Tiana-Jo Carter averaged 15 points and 17 rebounds per game last winter, and the Portland Press Herald reports she has already received full scholarship offers to Division I schools. The Lakers are so deep at guard that freshman CeCe Hancock stepped in and had 11 points and nine assists in an early-season win over Waynflete. York, Gorham, Spruce Mountain, and Wells could all make a run at Lake Region. Leavitt might not have all the pieces to go all the way, but the Hornets have one of the most entertaining players in the state in senior Kristen Anderson, who will play at the University of New Hampshire next season. Anderson can shoot from 30-35 feet out, and often does.

In Eastern B, Presque Isle is the decided favorite. The Wildcats finally got past Nokomis last winter and squeaked past Lake Region to win the state title. Presque Isle’s first three games this season were wins by scores of 39, 63, and 38 points, and that’s a good indication of how their regular season will go. The Wildcats are never very tall, but they throw lots of quick guards at you and can shoot from long range. Nokomis, which won’t face Presque Isle during the regular season, may have the best chance to defeat the Wildcats in the playoffs. The Warriors have three fine guards in Lindsay Whitney and twins Kylie and Kelsie Richards, and a good low-post option in Anna MacKenzie.

Class C boys: Dirigo has won four consecutive Western C titles, and until someone gets past the Cougars, they have to be considered the favorites again. Even after graduating seven seniors from last winter’s state champions, Dirigo was still picked first in the Mountain Valley Conference coaches poll. Boothbay is probably Dirigo’s toughest competition in the MVC, and Waynflete, which competes in the Western Maine Conference, could be a dark horse.

Houlton went 8-10 last winter, but may just be the No. 1 team in Eastern C. Kyle Bouchard, who can play pretty much any position, leads the Shiretowners. Among Houlton’s early wins this season was a seven-point victory on the road against a good Class B Presque Isle team. Penquis Valley and Lee Academy — which is currently on probation from the Maine Principals’ Association for recruiting violations — are also threats for the regional crown.

Class C girls: The Mountain Valley Conference is deeper, but the Western Maine Conference has the best player (Margaret Veroneau) and maybe the best team (Waynflete). The Flyers have a top-notch coach in Brandon Salway, and bring back all five starters. They’re good enough that they almost beat Class B Lake Region, losing by five on the road. Madison, Lisbon, and Monmouth are also contenders. Mt. Abram should have been in that mix, but the Roadrunners had some players decide not to return, and apparently don’t have everything they need to play with the top teams.

Calais, led by guard Madison McVicar and center Paige Gillespie, is the favorite in the East. Orono, Dexter, and Narraguagas are also in the hunt.

Class D boys: Forest Hills is known for a lot of things, like being closer to the Canadian border than any other high school in Maine, and having kindergarten through 12 all in one building. The Tigers also have a great basketball team. Senior Evan Worster already has over 1,000 points, and everyone returns from a team that went to the Class D state championship game this winter. The Tigers will get tested this season, as Valley, Greenville, and possibly Hyde all have the potential to cut down the nets after the Western D final in late February.

When Jonesport-Beals won the state title last season, it did so with a total high school enrollment of 58 students. It helped immeasurably that one of those was six-foot-five Garet Beal, the state’s Gatorade Player of the year. Beal will play at the University of Maine next season, and already has back-to-back 40-point games this season. The second of those was in overtime against Deer Isle-Stonington, a team that could challenge the Royals again this winter. Woodland could also give Jonesport-Beals a scare.

Class D girls: It looks like Rangeley and Richmond will battle once again for the Western D title. Rangeley, a school with about 80 students, has three six-footers in sophomore Taylor Esty, freshman Blayke Morin, and transfer student Emma Gunic. Richmond has its own six-footer in Jamie Plummer, the daughter of Colby College baseball coach Dale Plummer. Rangeley won the first meeting this season, 56-54 in overtime.

In the East, Washburn won the state title last winter with no seniors and three juniors. The Beavers did lose their coach when Mike Carlos was not rehired after winning two consecutive state titles. There were widespread rumors of parents being unhappy with Carlos, who is now coaching at East Grand. When Carlos was not rehired, superintendent Ed Buckley released a statement to the Bangor Daily News which included the line, “we do not measure the success of our athletic teams by the number of contests they win but whether it is a positive experience for all our students.” Diana Belskis Trams is now coaching the Washburn girls. Van Buren could give Washburn a run in the East. The Crusaders’ star is junior guard Parise Rossignol, who verbally committed to the University of Maine as a sophomore.

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