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Natick's Flutie embracing opportunity at BC

2/7/2014

NATICK, Mass. – The name Flutie is synonymous with Boston College. But it wasn’t just family lineage which led Natick’s Troy Flutie to the Eagles and Steve Addazio’s program.

“Meeting with him the first time, I was just like, ‘Wow, this guy is awesome!’” Flutie said of Addazio.

The Redhawks quarterback and this year’s ESPN Boston Mr. Football award winner is part of a large haul of homegrown talent headed to the Heights in the 2014 recruiting class. This year, the greatest number of Eagles recruits came from the Commonwealth with seven, ahead of New Jersey’s six.

The commitment to seeking out talent around the home base has become a priority for BC under Addazio – or “building a fence” around in-state prospects as he’s termed it. Looking to revitalize local interest in the program, the effort has created a twofold benefit for Massachusetts’ recruits, such as Flutie. Not only has it created greater opportunities for the state’s football elite to play and stay close to home, it has gone a long way to reestablishing its roots in the area.

“I think it’s real important for BC to recruit around here because I think, for a while, they lost that for a couple years previous to Coach Adazzio,” Flutie said Friday, “and I think he really wanted to bring that back and make BC really feel like a community with a lot of Massachusetts guys representing.”

After Wednesday’s National Letter of Intent signing at Natick High was snowed out, the school hosted a celebration in honor of its signees, with soccer standout Haley Reddish (Bryant University) joining Flutie for a photo-op on Friday. The moment was strictly ceremonial though, as both athletes had already submitted their paperwork at the beginning of the signing period on Wednesday.

Flutie enjoyed a historic season in his senior year, breaking state records in career touchdown passes (112), career passing years (9,014) and single-season passing touchdowns (47).

However, Flutie’s role with the Eagles is to be determined. Recruited first as a wide receiver, the 6-foot, 178-pounder should also see time with BC’s quarterbacks this summer.

Addazio mentioned Flutie by name when outlining the competition at quarterback during a conference call with reporters on Signing Day.

“We had Troy in camp and he’s just got ‘it,’” Addazio said earlier this week. “He’s a guy that has a knack for anticipating guys being open. He’s got a really unbelievable confidence about him. And he’s just got that demeanor that’s got leadership to it. He’s a dynamic athlete.”

Flutie was listed on BC’s Signing Day materials as a “quarterback/athlete.”

Whether Troy Flutie will follow in the footsteps of Heisman-winning uncle, Doug, at quarterback or his father, Darren, at wide receiver with the Eagles, the youngest member of Massachusetts football’s first family is only focused on contributing.

“It’s a nice opportunity that I have to play quarterback or wide receiver, I just want to get on the field as quick as possible,” Troy Flutie said.

Flutie stressed the importance of learning Ryan Day’s offense as his primary goal. He spoke of the opportunity to learn the ropes under Florida graduate transfer Tyler Murphy as a tremendous help.

“Realistically, I’ll play wherever I can get on the field the quickest and where they need me as a team. Wherever they want me to play, I’ll play. Anything I can do to help the team, I’ll do – if it’s wide receiver, quarterback, special teams, I’ll do it.”

For now, Flutie’s biggest priority is working out in preparation for June’s camp. He’s given up basketball this winter to spend more time in the gym, but plans to play one last season of baseball.

He’s learned of the vigor of the Eagles’ strength program from midyear signees Jon Baker (Millis/Hopedale) and Isaac Yiadom (Doherty). The Eagles’ Massachusetts contingent has already formed a kinship.

“We all went to the official visit together and we really bonded,” Flutie said. “We’re all very close right now and I can’t wait to get there with them and spending those next four years, maybe five, with them.”