Boston High School: Kimball Union

The National Hockey League's Central Scouting Service released its "Futures" list of prospects for the 2015 Draft on Tuesday.

North Chelmsford native and Boston University commit Jack Eichel, who is a potential No. 1 overall selection for next year, leads the deep, talented list of local products on the early list.

Here's a look:

(For the full entry, click HERE.)

United States Hockey League
Jack Eichel (North Chelmsford, Mass.), C, USA U-18, 6'2, 193
Casey Fitzgerald (Malden Catholic/ North Reading, Mass.), D, USA U-17, 5'10, 174
Noah Hanifin (St. Sebastian's/ Norwood, Mass.), D, USA U-17, 6'2, 200
Colin White (Noble & Greenough/ Dedham, Mass.), RW, USA U-17, 6'0, 178

United States Premier Hockey League
John Marino (South Easton, Mass.), D, South Shore, 6'0, 170

High School - Conn.
Taggart Corriveau, C/RW, Westminster, 5'11, 161

High School - N.H.
A.J. Greer, LW, Kimball Union, 6'2, 204
The NHL Draft kicks off tonight in Philadelphia and there are more than a dozen New England-bred skaters who are hoping to hear their names called during the two-day event.

Last year’s local draft class was exceptionally deep, with 12 New England-born players at the secondary or junior level coming off the board.

Before getting the scouts’ takes on this year’s class, here’s a look at the locals that made the NHL Central Scouting bureau’s final North American rankings:

SKATERS

45. Shane Eiserman, C/LW, Dubuque (Cushing, St. John’s Prep), 6-1 1/2, 200

58. Ryan Donato, C, Dexter, 6-0 1/4, 174

74. Miles Gendron, D, Rivers, 6-1 1/2, 181

79. Beau Starrett, C/LW, South Shore (Catholic Memorial), 6-4 1/2, 197

109. J.D. Dudek, C, Kimball Union, 5-11, 1/4, 180

116. Max Willman, C, Williston-Northampton (Barnstable), 5-11, 181

117. Tyler Bird, RW, Kimball Union (St. John’s Prep), 6-1 1/2, 200

119. Bobo Carpenter, C, Sioux City (Austin Prep), 5-10, 183

147. Jonathan Barry, D, Thayer Academy, 6-1, 192

177. Billy Sweezey, D, Noble & Greenough (Archbishop Williams), 6-0 1/4, 192

184. Sam Lafferty, C/LW, Deerfield Academy, 6-0 1/2, 187

203. J.C. Brassard, D, Noble & Greenough, 5-10, 190

GOALIES

14. Joey Daccord, Cushing (North Andover), 6-2, 199

In advance of the draft, we sampled the views of a couple of NHL amateur scouts based in the area and their evaluations of the aforementioned prospects.

Shane Eiserman
One scout’s take: “He’s a heavy body and he plays a heavy, physical game. He finishes his checks and he’s got a mean streak in him. He plays with an edge. He’s a good skater and he gets around the ice well – especially in a straight line. I think he projects a third-line winger, who can provide some secondary scoring.”

Scout’s need to improve: Scoring touch.

Ryan Donato
One scout’s take: “He has really high-end skills: great hands, super soft hands, great vision in offensive zone. So obviously that’s when he’s most dangerous, when he has the puck, you have to keep your head on a swivel. He has a great shot and the ability to thread a pass into a tight area.”

Scout’s need to improve: Skating.

Miles Gendron
One scout’s take: “He’s an interesting player because he’s a forward-turned-defenseman. He’s a kid that still needs time to learn the position, but he’s heading to UConn and he’s going to get great coaching from Mike Cavanaugh and Mike Souza – they’ve got big plans for him. He’s probably the most dynamic skater in the East – a great stride, fluid, long and thin with great balance. He’s a one-man breakout.”

Scout’s need to improve: Net-front defending.

Max Willman
One scout’s take: “I think he’s a kid that played at a lower level and was underrated for a while but he’s really coming on strong. I think he had a great year last year and he’s headed to Brown, so he’s maybe a bit of a wild card, just from perspective of taking the skill set that he has, and you can see it, and applying that to the next level. You might be taking a bit of a chance, but you’re getting a guy that has some really nice skill, can pass the puck as good as anyone and can shoot the puck well.”

Scout’s need to improve: Can he carve out role outside of top six skilled forward?

Bobo Carpenter
One scout’s take: “I don’t think he’s a natural goal-scorer, but he has an unbelievable shot, shoots a heavy puck. He’s good on the power play and he’ll be utilized there. He’s a very tough competitor and loves to finish checks. He’s always going as hard as he can to the whistle. He loves to the play in the role of a bottom six forward, and he can fit in there because he loves to finish checks and get those dirty, greasy goals. He’s going to a good place, a good school [BU] and I think he did fairly well in the USHL at the end of the season when he was there.”

Scout’s need to improve: Skating.

Joey Daccord
One scout’s take: “He’s a very technical goaltender. He handles the puck well and he’s good with his stick, he can move the puck like a college player. He’s very technical. He’s got good size, good height, a long, rangy kid. He just has to get a little more consistent with his play.”

Scout’s need to improve: Game-to-game consistency.

NEPSAC: Salisbury repeats as Elite 8 champions

March, 3, 2014
Mar 3
1:51
AM ET
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- You had to wonder if a trend was taking place.

With the top seeds in Sunday night's other two NEPSAC championship games going down to defeat, would a similar scenario be in store for the Salisbury School?

The way seventh seed The Gunnery School was holding its own on the ice, it was a distinct possibility. But to understand the strength of the Crimson Knights program is knowing that such fears are a considerable waste of time.

Even though it took a little longer than it would've like, Salisbury completed its mission in dramatic style.

Evan Smith's goal at 15:19 in overtime lifted the Crimson Knights to a thrilling 3-2 triumph over the Highlanders and be crowned the Stuart-Corkery Tournament champions inside Yale University's Ingalls Rink.

The victory earns Salisbury (24-1-4) its second consecutive Elite 8 championship. Last year, they defeated the Kent School, after the Crimson Knights also hoisted trophies in 2009 and 2006.

The Gunnery (20-7-1) forced the extra frame by striking for a pair of goals late in the third period.

But all of that was soon forgotten following Smith's heroics after taking a a tic-tac-toe pass from Derek Barach and sending a hard wrist into an open right side of the net.

"I was just busting down the line and I saw Barach up high and gave him a drop pass," said Smith, who will play his college hockey in the same arena next year for Yale. "He fed it back to me and I had an open right side of the net to put it into. It was deflating being up two goals with five minutes left and them coming back to tie it. But all of us kept our composure and we came out in overtime and were determined to repeat as champs and that's what happened."

After a scoreless opening period, Salisbury went to work in the middle frame. At 4:12, Kale Kane, a junior from Kahnawake, Quebec, on the power play, dove head first to push a wobbling puck across the goal line for a 1-0 lead. The initial shot came from Barach. The puck bounced off of Highlander goaltender Matt Schneider and flipped into the air and behind his left leg pad where Kane alertly knock it in. Barach, a senior, finished with two assists, giving him a team-high 33.

Four minutes later, with Alec Mehr serving a charging penalty, it was Kane coming up huge again. Lined up in the left slot, the forward took a nice crossing feed from Matthew Muzyka and beat Schneider with a one-timer to make it a two goal contest. Schneider, a senior, had a solid first period, stopping several quality shots to keep the game scoreless.

Overall, his play was stellar on the night except for a couple of miscues in the second and Smith's game-winner in overtime. Schneider finished with 35 saves.

Not to be overshadowed in all of this, Crimson Knights netminder Mitchell Datz, a senior from Kitchener, Ontario, was equally impressive between the pipes. Datz turned aside 20-of-22 shots with the only blemishes coming in the third when he surrendered goals to Mehr at 12:31 with the man-advantage, and couldn't catch up to Joey Fallon's bullet from the right wing circle at 15:18 to even this tilt.

"Overall I was pretty confident during the overtime," Datz said. "We hadn't lost an overtime game all year so I was pretty confident in my teammate's abilities to score. It was a little nerve-wracking when they tied it up but going into overtime I knew I still had a job to do and needed to remain focused and confident. Fortunately my teammates got the win."

Salisbury's defense did a nice job getting through those last few minutes of the third as they buckled down refusing to allow the Highlanders to gain any further momentum from their scores. In overtime, the Crimson Knights controlled much of the play. They consistently worked the puck inside The Gunnery zone, putting up 11 shots in the process with Smith's being the most important one of the night.

"This was a fantastic hockey game by both teams," Salisbury head coach Andrew Will said. "It was two teams playing their best hockey at the right time of the year and it showed. We score two goals in the second period and they come back with two in the third. In overtime all we were focusing on was getting the next goal. Giving up those two goals certainly takes wind out of your sails but our guys went back to the locker room and refocused. We didn't worry about what happened because it's so easy to do that. We just set our sight to coming back and playing our brand of hockey which I thought we did."

Martin/Earl final: Loomis-Chaffee 3, St. Paul's 2

In a wide open affair at both ends of the ice, leave it to a turnover to decide matters.

Loomis-Chaffee senior forward Alex Esposito, from nearby West Haven, picked off an errant pass inside the St. Paul's zone, skated in alone on goaltender Nathan Colannino (23 saves) before beating the junior glove side at 9:35 of the third period to give his team a 3-2 victory in the Martin/Earl Tournament. The triumph marks the first NEPSAC boys hockey title for No. 6 L-C (15-10-3).

Ironically, it was Esposito who scored the game-winning goal in the closing seconds of Saturday's 2-1 semifinal victory over Phillips Academy-Andover.

"Their defenseman was bringing the puck up and I went down and it hit my hand," said Esposito of his deciding score. "I just came down on their goalie and held him out a little bit and then went short side. This is such a huge win for our program."

L-C got hot at the right time heading down the stretch. They closed out the season going 5-0-1 in their final six games. According to head coach John Zawisza, this team was built on a premise that you had earn what you got with a lot of hard work.

"We had a couple of rough patches during the season but I think we started peaking at the right time and were able to come away with a championship," said Zawisza, whose club lost to St. Paul's in a regular season meeting back on Dec. 19. "I credit our guys' persistence during the season. Even when it was rough they still showed up for work every day. We were able to find consistency over the last two weeks of the season and the kids found that will to win."

With both teams getting a few quality looks on net during the opening period, the game remained scoreless until the waning seconds of the frame.

With 14 seconds showing, Austin Ricci pushed in a short-side shot into the net, putting No. 1 St. Paul's (20-9-1) ahead 1-0.

But L-C, showing a little more patients with the puck in the second period than it did in the opening frame, answered back. Senior defenseman Matt O'Donnell, flying down the left wing, beat goaltender Nathan Colannino with a hard backhander at 8:03 to knot things at 1-1.

St. Paul's followed that up with a couple of scoring chances on goalie Nick Kamm (13 saves) but were denied. Back came L-C down the other end. Ben Sharf delivered a perfect centering pass over to Esposito in front of the crease and Esposito buried it into the back of the net to give L-C a 2-1 lead after 36 minutes.

"Over the course of his career Alex has gotten a lot of big goals for us," Zavisza said. "As a coach you want your top guys to have games like that especially when it really matters."

St. Paul's wouldn't be down for long though. Just 2:08 into the third, senior Cam McCusker, got enough his stick on the puck to slip it past the out-stretched left leg pad of Kamm to deadlock things at 2 apiece. But the offense went silent thereafter.

"Loomis played very hard so give them all the credit," St. Paul's head coach Mark Bozek said. "Either we were tired or we didn't have our best game tonight. It's tough to come out on the losing end after you've worked so hard all year. We gave up a couple of odd-man rushes and they made us pay for it. Rarely tonight did we have an odd-man rush."

Piatelli/Simmons final: Kimball Union 5, Dexter 1

The Wildcats claimed their second Piatelli/Simmons Tournament crown in three years after storming past top seed Dexter.

KUA jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the second period and never looked back.

The second-seeded Wildcats (26-6-5) officially put this one in the books with a three-goal third. Westwood native Bobby Hall and Andover product Tyler Bird scored 13 seconds apartj, both coming from the left circle, midway through the final frame to extend KUA's advantage to 4-0. For Bird, it was his team-high 33rd marker of the season.

Dexter junior sniper Ryan Donato got one back (his team-high 37th) a few minutes later but the damage was already done. Dom Franco (Scituate, R.I.) added an empty-net goal for the Wildcats in the waning seconds to finish this one out. KUA defeated Holderness in the 2012 championship game. Prior to that, the Wildcats won titles in 2010 and 1982.

After an uneventful first period, the Wildcats started to force the action during the middle frame. The up-tempo style would lead to a pair of goals. Chris Shero started things off by ripping a one-timer off a left wing circle face off feed from Brendan Riley to put KUA on the board at 12:16. Three minutes later, with the Wildcats continuing to move the puck up ice, forward Jacob Paluch, positioned at his own blue line, took a pass and fired a shot through traffic that Dexter goalie Pat Fraser (20 saves) never saw coming.

"We did get stronger as the game went on," KUA head coach Tim Whitehead said. "We obviously had a ton of respect for Dexter and knew it would be a tight game. The final score was not indicative of how this game was. We were able to kill off some penalties which was very important because we knew they had a strong power play.

“Our goaltender Paul Leger (18 saves) played very well in net and was our best penalty killer tonight. We just kept pushing offensively and got more chances with each period."

Dexter, which was in search of its second championship having last won it in 2011, finishes the season at 22-6-2.

"They did a nice job of clogging up the neutral zone on us, especially early which limited us offensively," Dexter head coach Dan Donato said. "They also did a nice job neutralizing Ryan before he got going a bit. We made some coverage mistakes on those two goals in the third. Both of those players are high-end guys and that is what high-end guys do when you make mistakes. I thought their first two lines really moved the puck well for them."

NEPSAC AA: Cushing 76, Kimball Union 68

March, 2, 2014
Mar 2
11:39
PM ET
BEVERLY, Mass. -- This time, there was no doubt.

After defeating the St. Andrew’s School on a last second buzzer beater by Jalen Adams to win the 2013 NEPSAC Class AA Championship, some were left wondering whether Cushing Academy was a legitimate champion.

The Penguins answered all those questions and doubts Sunday by defeating Kimball Union (N.H.), 76-68, to win back-to-back Class AA championships.

“When you win it on a buzzer beater, there’s always those questions about did you get lucky? Was it a fluke? Did you deserve to win?” said Cushing coach Barry Connors. “The guys in the locker room know of course we did. You come back and win it again, and it sort of validates the first one. It feels even better this time than last year.”

This game featured future college basketball stars on both teams.

Kimball Union’s Abdul-Malik Abu, the No. 32 senior prospect on the ESPN 100, is signed to play at North Carolina State next season. Oliver Tot (9 points, 12 rebounds) will take his talents to William and Mary next year.

Cushing Academy’s Kaleb Joseph, the No. 49 recruit on the ESPN 100, is going to Syracuse to play for coach Jim Boeheim. Jalen Adams, currently the No. 46 junior in the ESPN 60, holds scholarship offers from Division 1 schools such as UConn, Creighton, and Providence.

The Penguins were able to keep Abu in check for the first half, holding him to only four points. In the second half, he was more assertive on the low block. He used his positioning and his muscular frame to out jump the Cushing bigs for rebounds and second-chance points. The senior finished with 16 points and 11 rebounds.

KUA went on a 9-2 run in the last two minutes of the first half to make the score 37-36. In what became a theme of the game, Cushing’s Connor Gilmore (12 points, 5 rebounds) hit a three before the buzzer.

Gilmore was also charged with defending Abu in the low block for most of the game. The senior held his own for most of the game, but when you are playing against a player like Abu that likes to draw contact, the fouls are bound to pile up. That was the case Sunday as he fouled out of the game with 7:51 remaining.

“He and Aaron Todd (2 points, 4 rebounds) did a tremendous job on the block fighting with Abu,” said Connors. “He’s averaging about 14 points a game for us over the course of the season, but the last 8 games he’s averaging 17 and 10 and he’s been hitting big shots for us.”

Cushing came out with a 12-5 run to open the second half and Kimball was playing catchup from that point on. The closest it cut the deficit to was 63-59 with 4:40 remaining.

A minute later, Abu fouled Adams (16 points, 7 rebounds) as he was going to the basket and was Kimball’s 10th team foul. For the rest of the game, he and Joseph (22 points, 6 rebounds) were at the free throw line extending the team’s lead. The two guards scored their way to a second league championship.

“I think this time around was better because this team got a feeling of what it was like to win,” said Joseph. “Me, Jalen, and Idris Taqqee knew what it was like to win a championship. We knew it wasn’t going to be that easy this year. We had more bumps in the road this year. We fought through it and that’s why it feels a lot better this time.”

Taqqee shines: Lost behind the statistics of future ACC players and future high-major commits was the play of Cushing’s Idris Taqqee. The St. Bonaventure commit dominated the first half of the game, scoring 16 of his 20 points in the opening frame while the defense was focused on stopping Joseph and Adams. He was hitting shots from all over the floor, including two from behind the three-point arc.

In the second half, his production quieted down while Adams and Joseph had the ball in their hands more as the game wound down.

“Idris is the consummate glue guy,” said Connors. “But how many glue guys are 6-foot-5 athletic studs? You see he’s starting to stretch it out a little bit. He’s knocking down three’s and handling the ball a little more. He’s the heart and soul and he sets the tone.”

Midway through the first half, he had 14 of Cushing’s 23 points. He also came down with five rebounds in the game, showing he’s not just a scorer.

“He has a will to win, he’s willing to do a lot of the things no one else is willing to do,” said Joseph. “He’s down there fighting with Malik Abu on the block and then he comes out on the perimeter and can hit jump shots. He’s really versatile. He’s kind of our unsung hero.”
The National Hockey League's Central Scouting bureau released its midterm rankings for the 2014 draft today.

Once again, local-based skaters littered the rankings, with St. John's Prep and Cushing Academy product Shane Eiserman leading the class. The West Newbury native was 39th among the 200-plus ranked North American skaters.

There is also a goaltender in the mix, with Thayer Academy standout Bob McGovern ranking 25th among North Americans.

Here's how the locals stacked up:

(For a look at the complete rankings, click HERE.)

Skaters:
39 Shane Eiserman, Dubuque - USHL (U.S. NTDP, Cushing, St. John's Prep), C/LW, 6-1.5, 200
44 Johnathan MacLeod, U.S. NTDP (Kimball Union), D, 6-1.5, 200
54 Ryan Donato, Dexter School, C, 6-0.25, 174
83 Beau Starrett, South Shore Kings - USPHL (Catholic Memorial), LW, 6-4.75, 195
85 Miles Gendron, Rivers, D, 6-1.5, 173
121 Michael Turner, Cushing Academy, LW, 6-1.5, 192
123 Tyler Bird, Kimball Union (St. John's Prep), RW, 6-1.5, 202
146 Bobo Carpenter, Austin Prep, C, 5-10, 183
157 J.D. Dudek, Kimball Union, C, 5-11.25, 178
159 Michael Lee, The Gunnery, D, 5-11.25, 165
177 Max Willman, Williston Northampton (Barnstable), LW, 6-0, 180
188 Dominic Franco, Kimball Union, RW, 6-2.75, 183
193 Billy Sweezey, Noble & Greenough, D, 6-0, 190
204 Evan Smith, Salisbury School, C, 6-0, 190

Goaltenders:
25 Bob McGovern, Thayer Academy, 6-4, 245

New England Roundup: New Hampshire

September, 28, 2012
9/28/12
5:04
PM ET
Rising star J.D. Dudek was considering verbal full-scholarship offers from Hockey East schools Maine and New Hampshire when the league-rival Eagles swooped in.

New HampshireBoston College matched the offer. Dudek didn't hesitate to accept.

“The hockey is, obviously, pretty incredible there,” Dudek said of BC, the defending NCAA Division I national champion and rink king in three of the past five years. “I'd love to pursue my career there.”

[+] EnlargeJ.D. Dudek
Courtesy of Dudek familyBC hockey commit J.D. Dudek
The 16-year-old resident of Auburn, N.H., verbally committed to BC on Aug. 23. It was shortly after he returned from a sensational performance at the Five Nations Tournament in Chomutov, Czech Republic.

Dudek – whose father is New Hampshire college football legend Joe Dudek – scored three goals for the United States Under-17 Select Team. The 5-foot 11-inch, 175-pound forward twice scored game-winning goals.

Team USA went 4-0 and won the tourney featuring clubs from the Czech Republic, Germany, Slovakia and Switzerland.

“The showing I had ... I'm just ecstatic with what the coaches and people think of me now,” said the high school junior, who transferred to Kimball Union Academy in Meriden, N.H., after two year's at Pinkerton Academy.

The talented teen helped lead the Derry, N.H., school to its second NHIAA Division I boys' hockey title as a sophomore. He scored 20 goals and 34 assists, played the point on the power play and served as the team's top penalty-killer.

Pinkerton coach Casey Kesselring, a former hockey standout at Merrimack College (Class of 1998), said the attention his former player received was strictly from skating with the national team.

“USA hockey has a pretty good model to identify players,” Kesselring said. “You try out for Team New Hampshire. They pick the team. Then you go to the New England festival. They pick Team New England. I know he was one of the highest-rated at that camp.

“When you're at a national camp,” Kesselring added, “all the Division I coaches are there.”

Dudek said he plans to complete his junior and senior years at KUA. He will remain in contact with BC coaches, and decide whether to join the Eagles directly out of high school or play junior hockey for a season.

Dudek's father – who became a national name at Division III Plymouth State University – said he never received Division I college interest as a high school athlete. The elder Dudek, of course, graced the Dec. 2, 1985, cover of Sports Illustrated as “The thinking fan's vote for the 1985 Heisman Trophy.”

“It all happened so quickly,” the former PSU star said of his son's recruitment. “A year ago, if you told me J.D. would have schools interested in him playing Division I hockey, I'd say you were crazy. He stepped it up at the USA camp, and it was fast forward from there.”

QUEEN CITY CONTROVERSY

The fact there's only one regular-season all-Manchester matchup per year – the result of the Queen City's four high schools no longer all playing Division I football – generates considerable buzz.

But this year, talk leading up to the Week 5 Central-Memorial clash focused on possible sanctions related to a player's transfer between schools.

A sophomore living in Central's district transferred to Memorial. The boy's father, in an unpublished interview with the New Hampshire Union Leader, said the reason was related to playing time – specifically, receiving it.

Transferring for athletic purposes violates Section 4 of By-Law Article II in the “NHIAA Handbook.”

The rule “assists in the prevention of students switching schools in conjunction with the change of athletic season for athletic purposes; (and) impairs recruitment and reduces the opportunity for undue influence to be exerted by persons seeking to benefit from a student-athlete's prowess.”

The schools are under investigation by the New Hampshire Interscholastic Athletic Association (NHIAA), the state's governing body for interscholastic athletics. Officials from both schools were instructed to submit reports that NHIAA executive director Pat Corbin will review.

Corbin, who said he has received conflicting reports from several sources, is expected to make a decision on possible punishments before Week 6 games on Oct 5 and 6.

Forfeiting wins is a possible penalty, as is a three-year postseason ban for either or both schools.

The bulk of responsibility lies with the school receiving a transfer student. In this case, Memorial needed to file a waiver affidavit for NHIAA approval.

Central principal Ronald Mailhot said his school followed student-transfer procedure.

Memorial principal Arthur Adamakos, who took a sick leave last spring and did not return until the 2012-13 school year started, told the Union Leader “we goofed on” the paperwork process. Adamakos, a longtime Queen City principal, said he has always abruptly ended any conversation with individuals seeking a transfer for athletic purposes.

The player – whose name was withheld from publication in the statewide newspaper – was deemed ineligible to play in the Central-Memorial game.

'COMPETITION FOR A CAUSE'

Windham's Jaguars sold “Black Out Cancer” t-shirts and purchased alternative jerseys for their Sept. 24 Division IV football game against St. Thomas Aquinas.

The Jags – donning all-black uniforms with green numbers – won the Week 4 clash between last year's Division V finalists, 51-16. They also raised $3,000 for the American Cancer Society's “Coaches vs. Cancer” program.

The fundraising goal was $2,000, said Bill Raycraft, Windham's head coach and athletics director.

STA head coach Eric Cumba, whose team's many supporters wore white t-shirts in support of the fight against cancer, called the game “competition for a cause.”

Windham used portable lights to play the Friday night game. Raycraft said the head count was tough to estimate.

“It was deep around the field,” Raycraft said. “I know the principal said there were no parking spots left. It was a packed house.”

Marc Thaler is a reporter for the New Hampshire Union Leader. He co-hosts the “N.H. High School Football Show” on WGIR-AM 610 and WQSO-FM 96.7. Read his blog at NewHampshireGameDay.com and follow him on Twitter: @marc_thaler.

New England Roundup: Vermont

July, 29, 2012
7/29/12
9:00
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All-Star football players from Vermont and New Hampshire have been butting heads in the Shrine Maple Sugar Bowl since 1954, and you could argue that Vermont has never needed a victory more than it does this year.

VermontNew Hampshire leads the series 43-13-2, and has won the last 11 meetings – many by one-sided scores. New Hampshire's recent dominance has some concerned about the game's health.

“There's no question there's pressure on Vermont,” said Rutland coach Mike Norman, who will coach this year's Vermont team. “For every athlete we have, they probably have one-and-a half or two. Hopefully we'll be coached up well enough to compete and get after New Hampshire a little bit.”

This year's game will be played Aug. 4 at Dartmouth College. The opening kickoff is scheduled for 2:30 p.m.

Practice for this year's game began Thursday at Kimball Union Academy in Meriden.

This is Norman's third tour of duty as Vermont's Shrine coach. He also served as Vermont's coach in 1998 and 2001. Vermont won 21-13 in 1998, and New Hampshire prevailed 21-0 in 2001.

Norman, who has led Rutland to seven state championships, said Fair Haven's Robert Coloutti will likely be Vermont's starting quarterback. Hartford's Tucker Stone, the other quarterback on the roster, is penciled in to start in the defensive backfield. Each quarterback led their team to a state championship last season.

“[Coloutti] is from a spread offense,” Norman said. “He'll play basketball at Castleton State. He was recruited to play football too. He can use his feet. He's an athlete.”

Stone, who is expected to be a defensive back at St. Lawrence, is one of nine Hartford players on the roster. Hartford has won the last two Division I state championships.

“We're gonna have to rely on the Hartford kids,” Norman said. “There's a bunch of them on the team, and they've had some success. In order for us to be successful it will have to be those guys leading the way.”

Mike Beliveau, the head coach at Souhegan High School in Amherst, N.H., is New Hampshire's head coach. Beliveau was New Hampshire's head coach in 2000, when Vermont posted a 47-40 victory. It was the highest-scoring game in the event's history.

New Hampshire has prevailed by using a power running game the last few years, but Beliveau said New Hampshire fans can expect to see his team throw the ball often in this year's contest.

“We will be different than the last few New Hampshire Shrine teams, when their were 60 snaps and maybe five or six passes,” Beliveau said. “We'll be way more balanced than that.”

The game will feature 15-minute quarters, and Norman said he plans to use a two-platoon system as much as possible.

“We'll be on the turf, it'll probably be hot and it's a long game,” Norman said. “We'll try to get as many people involved as possible. It's a matter of not panicking early, and getting into the flow of the game.”

VERMONT SHRINE MAPLE SUGAR BOWL ROSTER
Tucker Stone (Hartford), Matt Rafus (Windsor), Kyle Kelly (Rutland), Levi Ellis (Fair Haven), Marshall Hastings (Middlebury), Sam Kelly (Oxbow), Zach Devoid (Bellows Free), Jayson Collette (Milton), Jakob Oliver (Burr and Burton), Rob Coloutti (Fair Haven), Dillon Robinson (Middlebury), Owen Newton (Hartford), Soren Pelz-Walsh (Brattleboro), Alec Kozlowski (Colchester), Mike Schreiner (Bellows Free Academy), Travis Wilson (Hartford), William Thompson (South Burlington), Ryan Flemming (Champlain Valley), Alex Cross (Mount Anthony), Troy Bell (Hartford), Miles Latham (Hartford), Taylor Raftery (Bellows Free Academy), Dylan Raymond (Champlain Valley Union), Robert Murray (Hartford), Mack Shea (Rutland), Cody Collins (North Country), Steven Ladka (Hartford), Bobby Annis (Hartford), Adam Fortin (North Country), Austin Quesnel (Middlebury), Joseph Johnson (Hartford), Mathew Keir (Mount Anthony), Parker Lamoureux (Mount Anthony), Jamie Holbrook (Milton), Ben Thieken (Bellows Free Academy), Ryan Ragosta (Rutland).

Roger Brown is a staff writer for the New Hampshire Union Leader and publishes the New Hampshire Football Report. He has been reporting on high school sports throughout New England since 1992.

Locals taken during Day 2 of NHL Draft

June, 23, 2012
6/23/12
12:24
PM ET
Day 2 of the NHL Draft took place Saturday morning, and while there weren't any locals taken in Friday's first round, a host of New Englanders had their named called in the subsequent rounds.

Here's a rap sheet of those with New England roots who've been taken:

2ND ROUND
53. Tampa Bay Lightning - Brian Hart, Phillips Exeter, RW
56. St. Louis Blues - Sam Kurker, St. John's Prep, RW
59. New York Rangers - Cristoval "Boo" Nieves, Kent School, C

3RD ROUND
66. Nashville Predators - Jimmy Vesey, South Shore Kings (Belmont Hill), LW
75. Calgary Flames - Jon Gillies, Indiana Ice (USHL, South Portland, Maine), G
79. Chicago Blackhawks - Chris Calnan, Noble and Greenough, RW
85. Boston Bruins - Matt Grzelcyk, U.S. NTDP (Charlestown, Mass.), D

4TH ROUND
98. Minnesota Wild - Adam Gilmour, Noble and Greenough, C
106. Ottawa Senators - Tim Boyle, Noble and Greenough, D

5TH ROUND
125. New York Islanders - Doyle Somerby, Kimball Union (St. Mary's of Lynn), D
136. Ottawa Senators - Robbie Baillargeon, Indiana Ice (USHL, Enfield, Conn. via Cushing Academy), C
138. San Jose Sharks - Danny O'Regan, St. Sebastian's, C

7TH ROUND
189. Carolina Hurricanes - Brendan Collier, Malden Catholic, LW
The NHL Draft commences tonight in Pittsburgh and there is a host of New England-based high school, prep school and junior league players who hope hear their name called in the next two days.

Sam Kurker
Scott BarbozaMalden Catholic forward and ESPN Boston Mr. Hockey award winner Brendan Collier could be a sleeper in this weekend's NHL draft.
More than 20 local players were represented on the NHL Central Scouting’s final draft rankings, released in April. So we took the task to the Northeast regional scouts of an Eastern and a Western Conference team to give their evaluations of some of New England’s best and brightest.

The region is moving into somewhat of a renaissance. Folks might like to wax about the good ole days, but there’s plenty of talent to be found around the local ponds right now. That fact was not lost on Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli, who earlier this week during his annual pre-draft media availability, spoke about this year’s bumper crop.

“It is fairly deep,” Chiarelli said. “It’s the deepest that I’ve seen since I’ve been here and that’s a good sign. It’s a good sign that the registration numbers – usually, it means they’re going up – and obviously the quality of players for the NHL is increasing, too.”

So here’s a look at some of the local skaters to watch out for and their scouting evaluation.

(Players appear by NHL Central Scouting ranking among North American skaters.)

27. Cristoval "Boo" Nieves, Kent School, C
Scout’s take: “He’s an incredible skater, a tall, rangy kid. He’s more of a playmaker than a goal-scorer and finisher, but that’s what his role is, a playmaking-center man. His skating ability is as good or as close to as good as you’ll find in this draft.”

36. Sam Kurker, St. John's Prep, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got great size, a big strong kid. He’s a great straight-line skater up and down the wing. [He’s got a] big, hard shot and she shows a willingness to play in the hard areas in front of the net, in the corners on the wall.”

54. Brian Hart, Phillips Exeter, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got a huge shot. He’s real strong on the wall. He’s a very strong skater, in flight, he can really move.

Scout’s take on his soccer prowess as New Hampshire’s reigning Gatorade Player of the Year: “You know that overall athletes usually make the best players in whatever sport they decide on.”

69. Chris Calnan, Noble & Greenough, RW
Scout’s take: “Got better and better as the year went on. He started to play physical and use the body, which I think is everybody was waiting to see. He’s got a bomb of a shot. And he’s got a commitment to BC now, that was nice to see.”

Chiarelli’s take: “I mean there are some good kids in the prep leagues and the Calnan kid’s a good player – a big strong kid – very physically mature, power-forward type.”

76. Danny O'Regan, St. Sebastian's, C
Scout’s take: “He’s a smaller, undersized forward, but plays with a ton of hockey sense. He’s very strong on his skates and plays with a little bit of jam. His intelligence and hockey sense really stick out.”

77. Jimmy Vesey, South Shore Kings/ Belmont Hill, LW
Scout’s take: “The best player in the area. I don’t care where it’s at, 100 points is a 100 points [scored with the Kings last season]. He grew a few inches and he’s just coming into his own. Harvard stole him. BC and BU were sleepwalking on him. He slid through draft last year, but I thought someone would take a shot. Someone’s going to be happy with him this year.”

Chiarelli’s take: “You’ve got in the EJ [Eastern Junior Hockey League], you’ve got the Vesey kid’s a good player. He’s second time through the draft, but very skilled, had a breakout year there, can really make some really good plays with the puck, whether it’s shooting or passing.”

79. Devin Tringale, Lawrence Academy, LW
Scout’s take: “Talk about a vastly underrated player. I think he’s going to go later than he should, but someone’s going to get a steal in this draft. He’s going to be a big asset at Harvard when he gets there.”

88. Frank Vatrano, USA U-18 (East Longmeadow, Mass.), C
Scout’s take: “If you were to put him in the Catholic Conference or prep school hockey, he’s a 50-goal scorer. He’s got an NHL shot right now, he’s got such a quick release. He’s very hard to knock off the puck. He’s become a very good hockey player [with Team USA].”

99. Doyle Somerby, Kimball Union, D
Scout’s take: “He’s got great size, as a forward turned D-man, so he’s a pretty good puck mover. He’s more of a stay-at-home defenseman, but a big, rangy kid. Good smooth stride for a kid his size and good speed in flight.”

101. Adam Gilmour, Noble & Greenough, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got high skill, sets guys up. He’s going to get stronger. He’s a tall lanky kid. He’ll go to BC and that’s his type of game, playing a type of run-and-gun game, he’ll do fine there.”

143. Brendan Collier, Malden Catholic, LW
Scout’s take: “We hear this about him, he’s just a pure hockey player. Goal line to goal line, he works so hard, got a good compete level. I think he’s going to be a great college player. He’s got some potential because he just works so hard.”

Chiarelli’s take: “A couple of interesting one’s, the Collier kid, [he is] kind of under the radar a little bit, but a real gritty kid.”

177. Matthew Grzelcyk, USA U-18 (Charlestown, Mass.), D
Scout’s take: "I love him. His hockey IQ is up there with kids who are taken in the top 15 in the draft. If had to pick one kid to make the right play getting out of the zone, it’s him. He thinks the game. He finds the seams. He’s a hockey player. I think he’ll be running the PP at BU last year. He’s that David Warsofsky, Matt Hunwick type of player.”

Chiarelli’s take: “You’ve got some kids that kind of went to the U.S. Development Program but are from the area. The Grzelcyk kid’s a very good, mobile defenseman. He’s later on down but he’s got a good head on his shoulders.”

Locals selected in USHL Draft

May, 23, 2012
5/23/12
12:09
AM ET
The United States Hockey League held its entry draft tonight and there was plenty of New England flavor to the proceedings.

Here's the rundown of those selected by overall selection:

2. Muskegon - Adam Gilmour, RW, Hanover, Mass., Noble and Greenough.

7. Sioux City - Cam Brown, C, Natick, Mass., New Hampshire Junior Monarchs.

10. Waterloo - Chris Calnan, RW, Norwell, Mass., Noble and Greenough.

23. Omaha - Alex Rauter, RW, Morristown, NJ, Choate Rosemary Hall.

29. Indiana - Brian Morgan, C, Windham, N.H., New Hampshire Junior Monarchs.

32. Muskegon - Ben Foster, LW, Darien, Conn., Choate Rosemary Hall.

37. Cedar Rapids - Gavin Bayreuther, D, Canaan, Mass., Holderness.

41. Dubuque - Trevor Fidler, C, Watertown, Mass., Dexter.

73. Lincoln - Ross Olsson, RW, Billerica, Mass., Williston-Northampton.

77. Muskegon - Doyle Somerby, D, Marblehead, Mass., Kimball Union.

89. Indiana - Cam Askew, C, South Boston, Mass., St. Sebastian's.

123. Des Moines - Josh Couturier, D, Newbury, Mass., Boston Junior Bruins.

131. Dubuque - Noah Hanifin, D, Norwood, Mass., St. Sebastian's.

134. Indiana - Sam Kurker, RW, Reading, Mass., St. John's Prep.

222. Cedar Rapids - Jason Kalinowski, RW, Stamford, Conn., Salisbury.

225. Green Bay - Joe Young, G, Hanson, Mass., Boston Advantage Major Midget.

231. Sioux City - Nick Roberto, F, Wakefield, Mass., Kimball Union.

242. Muskegon, Corey Ronan, F, Franklin, Mass., St. Sebastian's.

245. Tri-City - Devin Tringale, LW, Medford, Mass., Lawrence Academy.

250. Waterloo - Ryan Cloonan, LW, East Longmeadow, Mass., Boston Advantage Major Midget.

254. Muskegon - William Messa, C, Lawrence Academy.

314. Indiana - Laythe Jadallah, RW, The Gunnery.

Lawrence, Berkshire, KU take NEPSAC titles

March, 4, 2012
3/04/12
10:01
PM ET


SALEM, N.H. -- If coach Kevin Potter was nervous before his Lawrence Academy boys' hockey team took the ice Sunday, he didn't show it while chatting in the media room before the puck dropped.

Potter's players didn't skate like the moment was too much for them to handle, either.

Harvard-bound forward Devin Tringale buried the eventual game-winning goal 18 seconds before the second intermission, classmate Nate Heilbron protected the lead to perfection in a pulsating third period, and the fourth-seeded Spartans knocked off No. 2 seed Noble & Greenough, 3-2, to capture the New England Prep School Ice Hockey Association tournament championship.

“We're a veteran team. I said, 'Let's not worry about Nobles. Let's worry about how we play,” said Potter, whose program, like Nobles, sought its first title in the high-stakes Stuart/Corkery tourney at the Icenter. “Except for the second period against Belmont Hill, out of the nine periods, we played our game. We dictated.”

LA also capitalized on Nobles' costly defensive breakdowns.

Perfect example: a span of 2 minutes, 25 seconds late in the second period. That's when LA struck twice to turn a one-goal deficit into the lead Heilbron was charged with protecting.

“That was huge. We always talk about the last 2 minutes of every period being important,” Potter said. “To get those two big goals there … that was big time.”

First-line wingers Tyler Whitney and Tringale fueled the surge watched by a full house, including more than 50 coaches from the college and professional ranks.

Whitney's one-timer from the back side was set up by Tringale's decision to hold the puck low in the left-wing circle. Conor Maher (30 saves) was forced to hold his position near the right post.

Tringale slipped the pass to his linemate for the open look. Tie game with 2:43 until the break.

Courtesy of the to-be Crimson skater, the contest didn't stay tied for long. Tringale teamed with Whitney and William Messa to generate the go-ahead goal with 18 seconds on the clock.

“Messa kept the puck in on the forecheck,” LA's 6-foot 1-inch, 195-pound winger said. “He made a nice pass to Ty Whitney, who made a really nice dish to me. It was just me and the goalie, and I went 5-hole.”

Tringale's tally capped a tremendous swing in momentum. Nobles answered the game's first goal, a first-period marker by Matthew Baldino, with two scores.

Cal Burke capitalized on LA's lone mistake of the opening stanza: a defensive zone turnover.

Will Sleeper gave Nobles its only lead barely 3 minutes after the first break. Heilbron's kick-save generated a rebound that Sleeper stuffed home.

Midway through the period, Colin White had a quality chance to dig LA a deeper hole. He used his body and a burst of speed to gain a step on Robert Klein. But Heilbron's left leg denied a low shot from the right-wing circle.

The save sparked LA, which increased its intensity in the offensive zone. It led to the two-goal flurry that altered momentum.

“We didn't have a very good last three-and-a-half minutes in the second period, obviously,” Nobles coach Brian Day said. “That was the difference in the game.”

Heilbron (28 saves) was a difference-maker, too.

Outshot through two periods, 26-14, the Bulldogs fired 16 of the third period's 23 total shots. Several attempts were within feet of LA's stopper, who wasn't fooled once.

“They put a lot of pressure on us. They threw a lot of pucks to the net. They gave us everything they had,” Heilbron said. “But my team and I, we stuck in there. We played our hearts out.”

Of the many near-markers Nobles launched, none came closer to lighting the lamp than PJ Falvey's blast from the left point. Falvey fired into heavy traffic, and a tremendous screen from teammate Max Franklin.

Heilbron, somehow, never lost sight of the puck. He gloved it, with Franklin towering over him.

In the end, though, no team this season is towering over Lawrence Academy.

“It's crazy,” Tringale said of the post-game scene inside and outside LA's locker room. “We got the coach with the bucket of water.

“We're all on top of the world right now. On top of New England.”

BERKSHIRE 4, ST. SEBASTIAN'S 3 (OT)
Brendan McGovern made the most of his open-net opportunity in the second sudden-death minute of the Martin/Earl tournament. It netted top-seeded Berkshire the large-school championship.

McGovern made St. Sebastian's goaltender Gordon Donnelly pay for an aggressive decision. Donnelly left the crease with an all-out dive to poke-check a rebound toward the right boards. But the puck stayed in the slot, and the forward from Centerport, N.Y., fired a strike.

Fifty-one seconds earlier, Donnelly (38 saves) made a dazzling glove save to keep second-seeded St. Sebastian's in the fight. Charlie Corcoran split two defenders and, with an open look at the net, snapped off a wrister from the low left-wing circle.

Berkshire built a 2-0 lead, courtesy of first- and second-period goals by Gus Harms and Greg Smart. But St. Sebastian's closed the second period sandwiching markers around a tally by Berkshire's Corey Wisnowski.

Those bookend goals, from Tommy Kelley and Danny O'Regan, pulled St. Sebastian's within 3-2.

David Loughborough delivered the equalizer at the 6:59 mark of the third period. He beat Patrick Feeley (27 saves) with a power-play goal.

KIMBALL UNION 3, HOLDERNESS 2 (OT)
Nick Roberto ended the Piatelli/Simmons tournament, lifting top-seeded KUA to the small school championship with 1:27 left in overtime.

Casey Miller forced a critical turnover along the boards and sent Roberto up ice, who beat Holderness goaltender Andy Monroe (40 saves) for the championship-clincher.

Both Monroe and KUA netminder Ryan Lund (28 saves) made several timely stops after third-seeded Holderness tied the final at 2-apiece. Gavin Bayreuther recorded the equalizer with a power-play blast from the blue line at the 9:43 mark of the third period.

Early in the third frame, KUA's Niko Rufo charged in from the right-wing side to snap a 1-1 deadlock.

Nick Renzi staked Holderness to its only lead, burying a second-period rebound at the 9:01 mark. The lead lasted less than 4 minutes as Jonathan Charbonneau connected on a breakout chance to knot the score.

Stuart/Corkery tournament championship
Lawrence Academy 3, Noble & Greenough 2


Lawrence 1-2-0 – 3

Nobles 1-1-0 – 2

First: L – Matthew Baldino (William Messa) 13:45; N – Cal Burke (Andrew Doane) 16:10

Second: N – Will Sleeper (Max Franklin, Doane) 3:08; L – Tyler Whitney (Devin Tringale, George Hunkele) 15:17; L – Tringale (Whitney, Messa) 17:42

Saves: L – Nate Heilbron 28; N – Conor Maher 30

Martin/Earl tournament championship
Berkshire 4, St. Sebastian's 3 (OT)


St. Sebastian's 0-2-1-0 – 3

Berkshire 1-2-0-1 – 4

First: B – Gus Harms (Kevin Rooney, Brian Brown) 15:28

Second: B – Greg Smart (Charlie Corcoran, Brown) 5:24; S – Tommy Kelley (Corey Ronan, Danny O'Regan) 5:52; B – Corey Wisnowski (Brown, Smart) 8:42; S – O'Regan (David Loughborough) 11:47

Third: S – David Loughborough (Stephen Brown, Cam Askew) 6:59 ppg

Overtime: B – Brendan McGovern (Rooney) 1:25

Saves: S – Gordon Donnelly 38; B – Patrick Feeley 27

Piatelli/Simmons tournament championship
Kimball Union Academy 3, Holderness 2 (OT)

Holderness 0-1-1-0 – 2

KUA 0-1-1-1 – 3

Second: H – Nick Renzi (Bailey Walsh, Gordon Borek) 9:01; K – Jonathan Charbonneau (John Macleod) 12:28

Third: K – Niko Rufo (Macleod, Charbonneau) 1:44; H – Gavin Bayreuther (William Kendrick, Matthew Thomas) 9:43 ppg

Overtime: K – Nick Roberto (Casey Miller, Rufo) 16:33

Saves: H – Andy Monroe 40; K – Ryan Lund 28

New England Roundup: Vermont

February, 28, 2012
2/28/12
3:38
PM ET
In recent years Vermont's head coach for the Shrine Maple Sugar Bowl has looked like someone about to start a fistfight wearing handcuffs.

VermontNew Hampshire has nearly twice as many schools with varsity football as Vermont, and that usually translates into more talent on the field. Rutland's Mike Norman, Vermont's head coach for this summer's game, will be trying to end New Hampshire's 11-game winning streak.

“Having done this a couple times, I know we're not gonna have as many big kids or skill kids as New Hampshire,” Norman said when the Vermont roster for this year's game was announced last week. “You have to have kids who are willing to stand up to New Hampshire during the game.”

This year's contest will be played Aug. 4 at Dartmouth College. New Hampshire leads the series 43-13-2.

Norman, who has guided Rutland to seven state championships, coached the Vermont Shrine team in 1998 and 2001. Vermont won 21-13 in 1998, and New Hampshire prevailed 21-0 in 2001.

“We're gonna try to do what we do – and what that is remains to be seen,” Norman said. “I know we'll have to defend the run, have a solid kicking game and be able to run the ball enough to make them defend it.”

Mike Beliveau, the head coach at Souhegan High School in Amherst, will be New Hampshire's head coach. Believeau was New Hampshire's head coach in 2000, when Vermont posted a 47-40 victory. It was the highest-scoring game in the event's history.

Beliveau has led Souhegan to four state championships and 14 championship game appearances in the last 14 seasons.

“For me the priority was to put together a quality offensive line,” Beliveau said. “The second thing I was looking for was a couple of quarterbacks who would be able to pick up the offense quickly.”

New Hampshire has prevailed by using a power running game the last few years, but Beliveau said New Hampshire fans can expect to see his team throw the ball often this summer.

“We will be different than the last few New Hampshire Shrine teams, when their were 60 snaps and maybe five or six passes,” Beliveau said. “We'll be way more balanced than that.”

Hartford's Tucker Stone, a three-year starter, and Fair Haven's Robert Coloutti will be Vermont's quarterbacks. Each led their team to a state championship last season.

“A lot of this game is gonna be determined by who your quarterbacks are,” Norman said. “We think we have two pretty good ones.”

Practice for this year's game will begin July 26 at Kimball Union Academy in Meriden.

“I like the overall athleticism of the group,” Norman said. “We have kids who will compete, and that's important against New Hampshire.”

(Read full post)

KUA's Roberto commits to Maine

February, 23, 2012
2/23/12
9:28
PM ET
Kimball Union Academy junior Nick Roberto has committed to the University of Maine-Orono for the 2013-14 season, head coach Mike Levine confirmed to ESPN Boston on Thursday.

Through 28 games, the 5-foot-9, 170-pound forward has 14 goals and 14 assists for 28 points for the Wildcats.

The Wakefield, Mass. resident played the previous three seasons with Malden Catholic, where last year he was a part of the Lancers Super 8 championship team.

"He competes extremely hard, plays with energy, and uses his speed effectively," Levine said.

Roberto is the fourth Kimball Union player with Bay State roots to give a commitment to a Hockey East school, joining Niko Rufo (PC), Doyle Somerby (BU) and John Macleod (BU).

Prep's Kurker leads locals on NHL Midterms

January, 11, 2012
1/11/12
12:26
PM ET
St. John's Prep senior forward Sam Kurker leads the list of locals on the NHL Central Scouting's Midterm Rankings of North American skaters.

Kurker, who has 10 goals for 14 points through seven games with the Eagles, was ranked 41st on the list released Wednesday morning.

Kent School center Cristoval Nieves was the highest ranked player with New England roots, ranked 31st.

Here's the complete list of New England skaters making the grade:
31 Cristoval Nieves, Kent School, 6' 2.75" 184, C
41 Sam Kurker, St. John's Prep, 6' 1.5" 198, RW
60 Brian Hart, Philips Exeter, 6' 2.0" 216, RW
94 Chris Calnan, Noble & Greenough, 6' 1.75" 188, RW
98 Devin Tringale, Lawrence Academy, 5' 11.75" 195, LW
103 Cam Darcy, U.S. U-18, 6' 0.0" 189, C/RW
112 Danny O'Regan, St. Sebastian's, 5' 8.75" 162, C
118 Frank Vatrano, U.S. U-18 (Longmeadow, Mass.), 5' 10.0" 218, C
127 Doyle Somerby, Kimball Union, 6' 5.0" 220, D
131 Brendan Collier, Malden Catholic, 5' 9.0" 168, LW
145 Adam Gilmour, Noble & Greenough 6' 2.5" 194, RW
170 John Stevens, Salisbury, 6' 1.25" 175, C
172 Alex Rauter, Choate-Rosemary Hall, 6' 0.25" 175, LW
180 Zachary Pryzbek, Salisbury, 6' 3.0" 196. LW
194 Alexander Gonye, Deerfield Academy, 6' 0.25" 162, LW
201 Bron Loiselle, Northfield-Mt. Hermon, 6' 0.25" 173, C
202 Tyler Wood, Noble & Greenough, 6' 2.5" 189 D
206 Brendan Silk, U.S. U-18 (Wakefield, Mass.), 6' 2.75" 191, RW

Goaltenders:
24 Joe Young, Boston Advantage AAA (Hanover, Mass.), 6' 1.5" 160
31 Dawson Sprigings, The Gunnery,, 5' 11.0" 190

Kimball Union's Chuku commits to Lehigh

October, 18, 2011
10/18/11
10:41
AM ET
Per his New England Recruiting Report, ESPN's Adam Finkelstein is reporting that Kimball Union power forward Jesse Chuku has verbally committed to Lehigh University for the 2012-13 season.

The 6-foot-7 London native spent time playing with his country's U18 national team in 2010. He made his decision following his official visit on Saturday.

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