Boston High School: Phillips Exeter

Recap: Dexter 2, Phillips Exeter 2

January, 24, 2015
Jan 24
5:17
AM ET
EXETER, N.H. – It wasn't a playoff game but is sure had characteristics of one.

Dexter Southfield and Phillips Exeter have both earned their respective places among New England Prep School hockey lore. Year in and year out, these two high-profile programs are often situated in the upper-echelon when it comes to overall success.

Friday night, the two teams faced off against one another, giving those in attendance quite a show. During its first 15 games, Phillips Exeter had yet to taste defeat. Ranked No. 1 by U.S. Hockey Report, the Big Red are looking every bit the part. Last year, the Big Red fell to Salisbury School in the semifinals of the Elite 8 Tournament.

Likewise, Dexter, which reached the Piatelli-Simmons small school divisio championship game a year ago before losing to Kimball Union Academy, hasn't appeared to have lost a step. After being dominated in the early going by Phillips Exeter, Dexter rebounded nicely shortly thereafter, hanging with the Big Red for the remainder of this tilt before settling for a 2-2 tie.

"That team is very good," said Phillips Exeter head coach Dana Barbin. "I thought both teams played their guts out tonight."

Dexter (9-5-4) held a slim 2-1 lead heading into the final intermission. However, Chicago native Max Roche sailed a shot from a sharp angle, just to the left of goaltender Nick Lanni, at 2:49 of the final period to knot things up. Both clubs see-sawed back and forth the rest of the frame but neither could not find the back of the net, thus forcing a five minute overtime period.

Midway through it the extra stanza, Dexter had three golden opportunities to poke the puck past netminder Bryan Botcher, who finished with 25 stops. But the post grad managed to keep the puck in front of him, much to the shagrin of Dexter. A short time later, Phillips Exeter (15-0-1) was given a pair of quality chances to end this contest, yet came away empty thanks to Lanni, who made 30 saves resulting in the deadlock.

Despite the Big Red taking control of the opening period, they skated into the first break with nothing to show for it. However, just 25 seconds into the middle frame, all of that changed. Senior forward Teddy Hart skated down the right side and blistered a shot that caromed off of the right goal post. Alertly, junior Devin Moore found himself in the right position to bat the puck past Lanni for a 1-0 lead.

Moments later, back to back Dexter penalties put Phillips Exeter in a position to add to its lead. Yet both times, the Big Red was turned aside having gone 0 for 3 on the power play for the game.

"It has been hard for teams to stop our power play but Dexter had three of them so credit to them," Barbin said. "But here is what I know. On January 23rd, I'm coaching a team that hasn't lost a game yet so that's pretty good stuff. In my 28 years here, we have never gone this far with a zero in the loss column. To have zero losses at this point I'm thrilled. I'm very proud of my team and we have a team that bust their butts all the time and has some skill."

Halfway through the second, the Big Red started to get careless with the puck, turning it over several times inside the neutral zone. With Phillips Academy having lost a bit of their competitive edge, Dexter was not about to let this opportunity slip by.

At 12:43, Dexter's Pat Daly, a highly-talented junior from Hamilton, worked his way behind the Big Red defense and scored on a backhand to even things at 1-1. Four minutes later, senior Kevin Hock put Dexter in front with a re-direct just outside the crease to send his club into the second break ahead 2-1.

“Pat Daly has really been a spark for us all season,” Dexter head coach Dan Donato said. “He can really skate and has tremendous speed. There should be a lot of guys coming to see him soon and really start to think about making an offer to him. Our kids came ready to play tonight but obviously we have a lot of respect for Exeter. I think we found ourselves a little as a team tonight."

Roche's tally to start the third seemed to breath new life back into the Big Red.

But to Dexter's credit, they stepped up its attack by pinching Phillips Exeter along the boards and shutting down the slot areas. In turn, the Big Red was giving Dexter the perimeter, opting instead to close down anything within 10 feet of Botcher. Each would prove beneficial in the late stages of this one.

"We've got some talent but we are young," said Donato. "I thought our goalie played great. Nick is a senior who has worked his butt off to fight for playing time and certainly gave us a solid game tonight. I think being such a young team, at times you tend to run into a roller coaster effect. But overall, we are happy with the direction we are going in."
The NHL Central Scouting Service today unveiled its "Players to Watch" list, providing the first evaluations for the draft eligible class ahead of the 2015 NHL Draft.

To little surprise, a few local products checked in with "A" grades, including North Chelmsford native and Boston University freshman Jack Eichel, who is projected as a top five selection by many draft observers. Former St. Sebastian's defenseman and Norwood native Noah Hanifin (Boston College) also collected an A grade, as did former Noble & Greenough center Colin White (U.S. NTDP).

"A" grades are assigned to prospects expected to be selected in the first round, B for second through third round picks and C grades given to players who are likely to be taken between the fourth and sixth rounds.

On current MIAA player received mention as well, as recent Northeastern commit and BC High defenseman Ryan Shea holds a C grade. Former Malden Catholic turned U.S.A. U-18 defenseman Casey Fitzgerald garnered a B grade.

Here's a list of the New England-based skaters appearing on the preliminary ranking:

"A" Grade:
Jack Eichel, Boston University (North Chelmsford, Mass.), 6-2, 195, C
Noah Hanifin, Boston College (St. Sebastian's - Norwood, Mass.), 6-2, 201, D
Colin White, U.S.A. U-18 (Noble & Greenough - Hanover, Mass.), 6-0, 183, C

"B" Grade:
Taggart Corriveau, Westminster (Conn.), 6-1, 176, RW
Casey Fitzgerald, U.S.A U-18 (Malden Catholic - North Reading, Mass.), 5-10.5, 186, D
Erik Foley, Cedar Rapids - USHL (Mansfield High), 5-11.5, 185, LW
A.J. Greer, Boston University (Kimball Union Academy), 6-2.5, 204, LW

"C" Grade:
David Cotton, Cushing Academy, 6-2.5, 200, C
Liam Darcy, Berwick Academy, 5-10.5, 175, D
Trevin Kozlowski, The Gunnery, 6-3.75, 186, G
John McDermott, Westminster (Conn.), 6-1.25, 185, C
Shane Sellar, Canterbury, 6-1.25, 186, LW
Eric Shaw, Middlesex School, 6-2, 215, C
Ryan Shea, BC High (Milton, Mass.), 6-0, 168, D
Will Somers, Hotchkiss School, 6-4, 228, LW
Luke Stevens, Noble & Greenough (Duxbury High), 6-3.75, 184, LW
Spenser Young, Dubuque - USHL (Phillips Exeter - Brentwood, N.H.), 5-9.75, 177, D
Three New England skaters will represent Team U.S.A. at the upcoming Ivan Hlinka Tournament.

Malden Catholic forward Matt Filipe (Lynnfield, Mass.), Tabor Academy forward Erik Foley (Mansfield, Mass.) and Phillips Exeter defenseman Spenser Young (Brentwood, N.H.) made the cut.

Filipe and Foley were selected to the tournament featuring the best U-18 talent acrosse the glove, after both participated in the U.S.A. Hockey Select-17 Festival in New York.

The Hlinka Tournament will be held at sites in the Czech Republic and Slovakia in August.

Recap: Phillips Andover 13, Phillips Exeter 12

November, 9, 2013
11/09/13
10:43
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EXETER, N.H. -- With less than 10 minutes remaining and down by five points, Phillips Academy-Andover was on the cusp of not only seeing its unbeaten record come to an end, but a potential NEPSAC Division A bowl berth be dismantled.

With a rushing offense that was averaging 245.4 yards-per-game, the Big Blue ground attack was in virtual lock down against a vigilant Phillips Exeter Academy defense. It was at that point when Andover head coach Leon Modeste decided to scrap the spread offense for a more-traditional power attack.

Inserting fullback Michael Moore as a lead blocker for tailback Ryder Stone, the Big Blue began their final possession at their own 11. The newfound strategy started to work as Andover started to make some headway down field. The Big Blue chewed up over eight minutes off the clock and marched 87 yards before Stone ran off-tackle to his left for a 6-yard touchdown with 31 seconds remaining to propel Andover to a gut-wrenching 13-12 victory this afternoon at 85 year-old Phelps Stadium.

It was the 133rd meeting of the nation's longest and, perhaps greatest, prep school rivalry. The Big Blue now holds a 69-54-10 advantage in the series, which began in 1878.

With the win, Andover (8-0) wraps up the NEPSAC Freelance Division and will play in a NEPSAC Division A bowl next Saturday. The opponent, site and time of the game will be determined tomorrow.

It marks the first time the Big Blue will play in a postseason contest since 2007, when it lost to Trinity-Pawling School (N.Y.).

"It's been a while since we beat them and it is really sweet to cap off an undefeated season," said Modeste, whose club had lost the previous five meetings to the Big Red. "We were running the spread but it wasn't working. On that last drive we decided to go to a different set by putting a fullback in, have him clear a path, and just pound the ball.

“Mike [Moore] is a very-inspirational runner for us and they couldn't just key on Ryder [Stone] any longer. It now gave us two options in the backfield to go with. We were able to run some counters and that was a big difference. You'd like to win by four or five touchdowns but that's not going to happen in this rivalry against a great Exeter club. This win will go down in the lore of this wonderful rivalry."

On that game-winning drive, Stone and Moore were beginning to find seams to cut through and, in the process, keep the chains moving. With 51 seconds showing on the clock, Andover faced a fourth-and-4 at the Exeter 15. Senior quarterback Ian Maag hit wide receiver Brandon Michel for a 5-yard reception and keep the Big Blue offense on the field. Two plays later, Stone, a workman-like back from Calgary, Alberta, took a handoff and darted around left end barely getting over the goal line for the winning score.

"I was struggling the whole game," said Stone, a senior who finished with 80 tough yards on 23 carries. "At the end we all came together. We just went though and executed. We didn't have to say anything on that final drive. We just looked at each other and knew it could happen. This group of guys have been great. We have weapons everywhere. There are no weak spots on this team."

The Big Red (6-2, losing their final two games) did mount a mini-rally after getting the ball back. Exeter was trying to get the ball in position to set up a possible game-winning field goal attempt. Reaching the Andover 38, quarterback Vin Sansone, in desperation mode, had his pass picked off by defensive back Alec Tolentino to close the deal for the Big Blue.

Throughout this contest, the Big Blue struggled to live up to its offensive potential. The Big Red defense took on the challenge and executed it brilliantly. Andover finished with just 165 yards, including 94 in the opening half. Likewise, however, the Big Blue's defense was equally instrumental in this triumph. Exeter encountered its share of difficulty trying to gain positive yardage. The Big Red did finish with 206 yards, led by senior running back, and former Brockton High standout, Austin Roberts (68 yards on 19 attempts).

With 1:12 left in the first quarter, Exeter jumped out to a 6-0 lead on Sansone's 2-yard push over the goal line. But back came the Big Blue. Moving the ball 81 yards, with a mix of run and pass, Maag (8-of-17, 46 yards), a Marblehead native, closed out the drive with a 1-yard dive over the goal line. Tom Mullen's PAT put Andover on top, 7-6, with 7:01 remaining before halftime.

Things stayed that way until midway through the third quarter. After the Big Blue went four-and-out on their first possession to begin the second half, the Big Red, behind the hard-running of Roberts, marched 45 yards before Roberts capped the drive off with a 7-yard scamper into the end zone to make it 12-7. Both teams failed to move the ball on its next two possessions before Andover was finally able to convert on its most-productive drive of the season which led to its clinching score.

"Our kids emptied their tanks today," first-year Exeter head coach Rob Morris said. "Sometime you play terribly and you still come out on top and sometimes you play your heart out, everything clicks, but the other team gets the win. Our kids can be proud that they played that way.

“Coming into this game we knew their strength was our strength and that was running the football. We both slugged it out. Unfortunately they just had one more punch than we had."

A midsummer hockey notebook

July, 24, 2013
7/24/13
6:36
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Catching up on a few notes from the (melted) local ponds of late:

RANKINGS SCHMANKINGS
The NHL Draft always brings surprises, and Dexter School’s Tim Harrison was no exception.

Now, it shouldn’t come be a complete head-scratcher that the 6-foot-3 winger who’s committed to Colgate was selected by the Calgary Flames in the sixth round in last month’s draft. However, in the buildup, Harrison was ignored by NHL Central Scouting and its compilation of the top prospects in North America. The Duxbury native did not appear on the service’s “Watch List,” midterm or final rankings reports.

Despite the lack of love from the league’s draft gurus, Harrison attracted attention from the scouting staffs of the Flames and Chicago Blackhawks during the spring and scored high marks with Calgary’s brass during the pre-draft process. So much so that the Flames took Harrison with the 157th overall pick.

“It’s a tough draw,” Dexter head coach Dan Donato told ESPN Boston. “Teams aren’t going to show their cards throughout the process, but you can get hints every now and then.”

Harrison is a bit of a character (he’s described himself as such), and is known around Dexter hockey as the straight-shooting, loquacious sort. If you need further proof, check out this segment with Flames TV from the team’s development camp earlier this month (WATCH HERE).

His gift for gab, along with the willingness to use his frame in playing the physical game, helped Harrison leave an impression on Calgary’s staff. After having an one-on-one with Harrison, one Flames scout remarked to Donato that Harrison was perhaps the best interview he’d had with a prospect in decades.

But Harrison’s also made his presence felt on ice. During development camp, as highlighted during the aforementioned clip from Calgary, Harrison also dazzled the fans with a couple of nifty moves on penalty shot drills. He also mixed it up with fellow campers on ice, showing he has a mean streak.

Just don’t be fooled by it.

“He’s a pretty mello kid, actually,” Donato said. “Colgate’s getting a great kid. Don’t know what his role will be there, but what I know is that both they and the Flamers are getting a really good kid.”

And a hoot.

EASTERN PIPELINE?
Notre Dame joins Hockey East this year, but the Irish already made a splash in the northeast recently with the commitment of Noble and Greenough center Cal Burke.

Burke, a Boxborough native, led the Bulldogs in scoring (34 points) last season. A 1997 birthdate, the 5-foot-10, 160-pounder also was selected by Cedar Rapids in May’s USHL Draft. Burke’s date of arrival in South Bend is intended for 2015-16.

“He’s a gifted player and he’s a great match for their program,” Nobles head coach Brian Day said. “Cal truly plays an all-around game. He’s a smart player and he incorporates his teammates well into the play.”

While the Irish catch a top recruit, Burke’s commitment could come with two-fold implications. For Notre Dame, entering a new conference otherwise situated exclusively in New England, perhaps Jeff Jackson’s staff will increasingly dip into the regional talent pool. With its present roster consisting primarily of players from the Midwest and out to the Pacific Ocean, can we expect Notre Dame to come east for more than road trips?

“There would definitely be advantages,” Day said to the notion. “If kids are in the Northeast, their families don’t have to always go out to Indiana to see their games, given that they’ll be playing here now. Plus, it’s a national brand, everybody’s heard of Notre Dame.”

HERE AND THERE
There were a couple of other Hockey East commitments coming from local skaters during the last week or so.

First, Austin Prep’s Nolan Vesey will become the third member of his immediate family to play college hockey, verballing to Maine. A four-year standout for the Cougars, Nolan joins father Jim (Merrimack) and older brother Jimmy (Harvard).

Nolan Vesey is a modern-day rarity though, having playing four years of MIAA hockey before earning a college hockey scholarship. Jim Clark of the Boston Herald spoke to Vesey last week about the subject last week, and the forward was candid about the struggles in staying close to home.

“I’d be the first one to tell you, my first few years at Austin I was looking at prep schools,” Vesey told Clark.

Joining Vesey among the most recent local Hockey East commits, Phillips Exeter defenseman Spenser Young announced he’d committed to Providence College earlier this week via Twitter. The rising sophomore and Brentwood, N.H. native chose the Friars from a host of interested H.E. schools.

Deerfield lax continues tradition of excellence

May, 11, 2013
5/11/13
1:53
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DEERFIELD, Mass. – With the start of the 2013 NCAA men’s lacrosse tournament upon us this weekend, there is a good chance that when you tune in you will see Deerfield Academy lacrosse alumni playing an important role in the game.

Of the 16 NCAA tournament teams there are 14 Deerfield alums playing or coaching on eight teams. Cornell head coach Ben DeLuca and Teewarton Trophy (Player of the Year) finalist Rob Pannell are both Deerfield alums, as is North Carolina star attack Jimmy Bitter, to name a few.

Tucked away in the historic, rural town of Deerfield, Mass., resides one of the top high school lacrosse programs in the United States.

[+] EnlargeFinigan
Ryan Kilian for ESPNFormer Concord-Carlisle standout and ESPN Boston All-State selection Jackson Finigan has joined Deerfield Academy for a postgraduate year before heading to the University of Delaware next year.
Deerfield Academy, a school with a total student body of approximately 600, is known for its elite academics, as well as competitive college preparatory school athletic program. Founded in 1797, Deerfield Academy is set on a picturesque campus located 30 miles North of Springfield, Mass. in the Western part of Massachusetts.

The boys’ lacrosse program, which is run by 20-year head coach and athletic director Charles “Chip” Davis, has put together 20 consecutive winning seasons. They have won or shared a piece of their conference title in seven of the last eight years and are a jaw-dropping 87-4 overall in the past seven season of play.

Deerfield competes in the Western New England Division 1 Conference, known as one of the strongest leagues in the country. Their fellow WNE D1 competitors include the likes of Avon Old Farms, Salisbury School, Brunswick School and rival Choate-Rosemary Hall.

The balance and strength of the WNE conference has improved over the years with many of the top high school and future college stars headed to New England to further educate in the classroom and on the lacrosse field.

“There are a number of very high level payers at almost every team in our league now,” Davis said. “That speaks to the amount of good players that play the game and these schools are attracting these very high level players. This was not always the case.”

The Beginning: Every elite program has a defining period when it makes its ascension to the top and remains there.

Davis attributes much of the start of Deerfield’s reign at the top to a midfielder out of Charlottesville, Va. named Henry Oakey. Oakey came to Deerfield in 1993 and would go on to star at the University of Virginia and graduate with a National Championship (1999).

“He was one of those kids who I would consider a catalyst,” Davis recalled. “I felt like ever since he got to Deerfield we have not had a losing season. We had three good years in the mid 1990’s where we only lost two games a year and since about 2000 we have been at the top of the league each year. “

Alumni: The impressive list of Deerfield alumni who have moved on to successful intercollegiate lacrosse careers is as impressive as it is large. In the 2013 season Deerfield alums played on 10 Division 1 programs (six Ivy League teams, three ACC teams, and one Patriot League team) with numerous other Division 3 schools also represented.

Pannell, Bitter and others are both looking to lead their college lacrosse teams to the NCAA Championship this season. Deerfield also boasts alumni such as Bitter’s older brother Billy, who attended Deerfield before starring as an All-American attack at North Carolina. The older Bitter is now playing in the professional ranks.

“Personally, when deciding boarding schools I couldn't think of any negatives about Deerfield,” Jimmy Bitter told ESPN Boston when I spoke to him during his final season of play at Deerfield. “It has great academics, a very friendly environment, and a top athletic program. The school taught me to push myself academically and grow as a lacrosse player. Coach Davis is very knowledgeable about the game of lacrosse and really makes an effort to improve each player.”

College Preparation: The elite lacrosse, balanced with the rigorous academic schedule, is why many student-athletes choose Deerfield. Deerfield offers students a grade 9-12 boarding and day school experience as well as a postgraduate option.

Canadian born attack Joe French is doing a Postgraduate year at Deerfield this year before heading to the University of Virginia to play for head coach Dom Starsia.

French was young for his grade as a 16-year old senior, and thought by doing another year of school it could help prepare him both athletically and academically for UVA. French settled on Deerfield due in part to its academic reputation, and close alumni network.

“Deerfield has been a blast and I am a little bit sad that this year is coming to an end,” French said. “Academically I have taken an array of classes from public speaking to statistics, or even an English class called ‘Reading Insanity.’ The lacrosse is just a bonus. We have a great team and every day of practice is just another way to get better because the long pole your dodging is going to UVA or Army, or the middie your feeding is going to Princeton or Delaware.”

Like French, Jackson Finigan is also currently doing a PG year at Deerfield. Finigan is committed to play lacrosse at the University of Delaware next year and won an MIAA state championship last season at Concord-Carlisle High School. Finigan chose to attend Deerfield after visiting the campus, meeting with Davis and learning about the high-level combination of academic and athletic success at the school.

“At Deerfield we are held to the highest standards to perform in the classroom and on the field,” Finigan said. “The school work is as hard as any college and the lacrosse is about as good as any college level as well. Between balancing lacrosse and schoolwork I have grasped a sense of time management that I can carry with me for the next four years in college.”

2013 Season: French and Finigan are two members of a 2013 squad that currently sits atop, with Brunswick School (Conn.), of the WNE Conference D1 with an overall record of 12-1.

Deerfield has three games remaining against three of their toughest competitors in Avon Old Farms, Salisbury, and Phillips Exeter in their quest for another WNE conference D1 championship. Davis knows all too well that it will not be an easy feat.

“We are coming into the home stretch of our season with three games to play,” Davis said. “All three teams are very good teams and we always have competitive games with all three.”

Deerfield is averaging 12 goals a game this season and is holding teams to an impressive six goals against on average. Davis attributes much of this season’s success to experience and leadership.

“We have two outstanding captains this season in attack Adam Philie (Dartmouth commit) and defender J.R. Mastro (Trinity),” Davis said. “Both came to Deerfield as sophomores, both are good friends and are outstanding, mature leaders.”

After suffering a two-goal opening game loss to Brunswick, Deerfield has ripped off 12 consecutive wins and has improved with each win this season.

“The style of lacrosse that we are playing is unselfish by nature,” Davis said. “I knew we had a lot of talented kids this year so we have had to manage their expectations about playing time and they have bought into the selfless mindset.”

Deerfield, along with all of the NEPSAC lacrosse programs, does not participate in any post-season tournaments due to the nature of the spring athletic season and the limits with end-of-year scheduling. While many would like to see some sort of tournament Davis embraced the current state while acknowledging the difference with the public school tournament format.

“It gives each game its own importance,” Davis said. “If you lose a game that may not feel like a big rivalry game it may come back to bite you. Too often times we do not live in the moment.”

Askew among locals on track for USHL

May, 6, 2013
5/06/13
11:55
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While South Boston native Cam Askew already had been selected in the United States Hockey League's Draft last year, the Cushing Academy forward was tied to the top of Phase 1 of the 2013 Draft.

Holding the top pick in Monday's draft proceedings, the Indiana Ice decided to forego using their pick, instead signing a tender with the Boston University commit. Indiana had selected Askew with the 89th overall pick last May.

This is the second year of the tender system by USHL rules. All players signed to tenders guarantee that they will play in a minimum of 50 percent of their teams games in the upcoming season.

Here's a look at all the skaters with local connections who were selected during Monday's proceedings:

Round 1, Pick 11: Ryan Dmowski (Oakdale, Conn.), C , The Gunnery - Des Moines

Round 3, Pick 5: Charlie Kelleher (Longmeadow), F, Boston Junior Bruins - Cedar Rapids

Round 3, Pick 15: Spencer Young (Brentwood, N.H.), D, Phillips Exeter - Dubuque

Round 4, Pick 3: Austin Rook (Shrewsbury), D, Rivers - Des Moines

Round 4, Pick 5: Cal Burke (Boxborough), C, Noble & Greenough - Cedar Rapids

Round 5, Pick 3: Callum Booth (Montreal, PQ), G, Salisbury - Muskegon

Round 5, Pick 15: Lincoln Griffin (Walpole), F, Thayer Academy - Dubuque

Round 6, Pick 5: Erik Foley (Mansfield), F, Tabor Academy - Cedar Rapids

Round 6, Pick 10: Liam Darcy (South Berwick, Maine), D, Berwick Academy - Green Bay

Round 7, Pick 15: Elijah Harris (Haverhill), G, Austin Prep - Dubuque

NEPSAC: Cushing 1, Avon Old Farms 0

March, 3, 2013
3/03/13
4:28
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SALEM, N.H. -- Cushing Academy coach Rob Gagnon doesn't root against Avon Old Farms – his alma mater – very often, but he did Sunday.

That's when Gagnon watched his Cushing team punctuate it season with a 1-0 victory over Avon to win the New England Prep School's Martin/Earl Tournament in the second of three NEPSAC championship games at the Icenter.

It was the third time Gagnon has coached against Avon. The teams skated to a 4-4 tie last season, and a 2-2 tie in December.

“Anytime you play your alma mater and win it makes it more special, but it's not about me – it's about my kids,” Gagnon said. “I'm proud of the way we competed.”

Junior forward Shane Kavanagh scored the game's lone goal 24 seconds into the contest. A shot from the point hit Kavanagh, who collected the loose puck and beat Avon goalie Cody Doyle with a shot from the right faceoff circle.

“It was a faceoff and we didn't execute defensively,” Avon coach John Gardner said. “We missed a defensive assignment. It happens. They're not pros.

“I thought there might be a lot of numbers [on the scoreboard] after that start, but the Cushing goalie played particularly well.”

Cushing senior Mike Dion made 31 saves. Doyle stopped 20 shots.

“The team played really good defense,” Dion said. “They kept everything to the outside. They didn't have many good scoring chances. It was a good way to go out.”

Gagnon said he thought it was Dion's best game in a Cushing uniform.

“His rebound control was very good,” Gagnon said. “In the first period he juggled some pucks, but swallowed everything after that. I expected this to be a 3-2 or a 4-3 game, but you never know – that's why you play.”

Third-seeded Avon was playing without two of its top forwards: senior Vincent Russo (high ankle sprain) and junior Daniel LaFontaine (broken collarbone).

Avon, which beat sixth-seeded Choate (8-0) and second-seeded Thayer Academy (3-2) to reach the championship game, completed it season with a 16-9-4 record.

“We didn't get done what we wanted to this season, to be honest with you,” Gardner said. “We battled through a lot of injuries. We have a lot of tough kids.”

The victory raised top-seeded Cushing's record to 21-7-4. Cushing posted victories over eighth-seeded Governor's Academy (4-2) and fifth-seeded Phillips Exeter (6-3) earlier in the tournament.

“We wanted to prove to the critics that we are a good team,” Gagnon said. “We wanted the kids to come together at the end – and that's what they did. It's great to bring a championship back to Cushing.”

Bangor hockey coach reacts after resignation

December, 21, 2012
12/21/12
12:57
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Denis Collins says he didn't think anything of the comment at the time. He coaches high school kids, and he made a joke they thought was funny.

The bus trip that followed led to an investigation, and the investigation led to Collins resigning in his third season as Bangor High School hockey coach, just two games into the regular season and less than 12 months after being named Class A Ice Hockey Coach of the Year.

On Dec. 11, Bangor had a road game at Presque Isle. Even for Bangor, the northern-most team in Maine Class A football, Presque Isle is a long trip. The bus ride is about three hours each way.

"A couple of nights before we left for Presque Isle," Collins said, "I told the kids, 'We need to watch how we hydrate ourselves. It's going to be a long trip. We're going to try not to stop.'"

Collins said he added, jokingly, "It looks like a pee jug trip for us."

As the bus trip approached, Collins said a rest stop was not possible. The team had to be on the ice at 4:45 p.m., and he says the bus didn't get on the highway until around 1:15. Stopping along the way in Millinocket or Houlton would have meant getting off the interstate, and another 15 or 20 minutes. Collins was worried about the Rams receiving a bench minor for not taking the ice in time.

"Nobody asked to stop," Collins said. "But I guess, on the way there, someone urinated into a jug."

Collins said players stood up on the bus when one of them began urinating. The players standing up caught his eye, so he looked back and saw someone apparently relieving himself.

"I turned around and said, 'Hey! Hey! We can't have any of that! Stop!" Collins said. "And it ended."

According to Collins, there was one female on the bus, who sits next to him, behind the bus driver. Collins said she did not react, and she "absolutely" could not have seen the player urinating.

"There were too many guys there," Collins said.

Two nights later, Collins was in Bangor to watch his son, Andrew, who plays for Brewer. He says some Bangor players told him they were asked about what went on during that bus ride.

"I knew right then and there, there was going to be some problems," Collins said.

According to Collins, he sat down with an administrator the following day and was told he should not have made the "pee jug" comment. During the meeting, Collins said he was going to resign in the best interests of the team, but he says he was talked out of it.

On Monday, there was another meeting. Collins will not get into specifics of that meeting.

"Things had changed, major," he said. "There was a resignation, but I'm just going to leave it at that."

Collins said he will not discuss that meeting because he is meeting today with Dr. Betsy Webb, the school superintendent.

"I definitely have to meet and give the superintendent an opportunity to see if there was a fair investigation, and if I was fairly treated," Collins said.

Since the investigation became public, Collins said he has received tremendous support. including contact from New York Islanders coach Jack Capuano (who played at the University of Maine) and current UMaine coach Tim Whitehead.

Kyle Alexander, who now plays for Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, wrote about Collins on Facebook, "Like him or not, he's the best coach I've ever played for. He put countless hours into the sport of hockey, and youth hockey specifically. I played for him for at least 7 years, and he found a way to keep each year interesting. He was one of the few youth coaches I had that was focused on developing quality hockey players as well as developing good young men in the process."

"That brought tears to my eyes," Collins said. "My wife was crying. My kids were crying."

Former assistant Quinn Paradis is now coaching Bangor, and Collins said he would love to come back and coach the Rams.

"I've been with these kids forever," he said. "This is a state championship team. They can do it. They have all the elements: Good kids, good character, hard-working. I've known the parents since before their kids were born. These kids are like my own."

Recruiting Notes: Prep's Bavaro set for Dartmouth

November, 23, 2012
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Lucas Bavaro called it the toughest decision he's ever made, but in the days leading up to the deadline the choice became clear: He was going to play college football at Dartmouth.

Recruiting NotebookBavaro, a senior at St. John's Prep, received an offer from Dartmouth after attending a football camp there last summer. An offer from Colgate was also on the table, but the Dartmouth coaches asked Bavaro to give them a decision no later than early November.

“It really came down to Colgate and Dartmouth,” Bavaro said. “They wanted me to go early decision, so I think they needed an answer by November 5, but I didn't even need the deadline. Every day I became more and more confident with my decision.”

Bavaro, who plays tight end and an outside linebacker/strong safety hybrid position for St. John's Prep, committed to the Big Green earlier this month. He will play safety in college.

Several other Ivy League schools showed interest in Bavaro, as did FBS schools like Boston College and Connecticut. Bavaro said BC asked him to attend prep school for a year before enrolling, but he had no interest in going that route. He said Ivy League football – and an Ivy League education – had a special appeal.

“My dad [former NFL tight end Mark Bavaro] said football is not forever,” Bavaro said. “I was also thinking about life after football.”

Bavaro, an 18-year-old Boxford resident, will join former Everett High School quarterback Jonathan DiBiaso at Dartmouth next season. DiBiaso is currently attending Phillips Exeter Academy.

“When [Dartmouth] made the offer I was ecstatic,” Bavaro said. “Location was one of the factors. It's like a six-hour ride to Colgate. Dartmouth is about two hours.

“I thought about this decision every day. It feels great to get it over with.”

PINKERTON'S RISING STAR
Pinkerton Academy (Derry, N.H.) running back Manny Latimore will likely be the top-rated recruit in New Hampshire next season.

Latimore ran for 177 yards and scored two touchdowns – one on a 78-yard punt return – in Saturday's 31-21 loss to Exeter in New Hampshire's Division I championship game. Latimore rushed for 1,477 yards and 27 touchdowns during his junior season.

Latimore also starts in the defensive backfield for a Pinkerton team that has reached the Division I title game in each of the last three seasons.

“I think I've been around this long enough to know if a kid can play in college, and football is in Manny's future,” Pinkerton Academy coach Brian O'Reilly said. “I think he'll be a running back. He can run inside and he can run outside. He can also catch the ball.”

Matt Jordan (UMass), Ryan Mihalko (Notre Dame) and Joe Segreti (Holy Cross) are among the Pinkerton Academy running backs who have played in college.

“Manny has track speed and he has football speed,” O'Reilly said. “Sometimes that track speed doesn't always translate. A lot will depend on what camps he attends this summer.”

QUARTERBACK OPTIONS
As reported on ESPN Boston earlier this week, Tabor Academy quarterback Miles Wright received a scholarship offer from UMass last weekend.

Wright transferred to Tabor Academy from Boston Latin, and is repeating his junior year. UMass has one QB in its current recruiting class: Todd Stafford of The Brunswick School in Greenwich, Conn. Stafford, a three-star recruit, committed in March.

Wright is a dual-threat quarterback who scored 23 touchdowns (12 passing) in eight games for Tabor this season.

Information regarding high school or prep school players in New England can be sent to Roger Brown at rbrown@nhfootballreport.com.

Recruiting Notes: Coggins de-commits from BC

September, 26, 2012
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Strange as it may sound, David Coggins couldn't have been happier last Thursday when he learned that he would be ineligible for the first four games of the 2013 season.

Coggins, a three-star receiver from Sacred Heart High School in Waterbury, Conn., feared he would lose his entire senior season because of recruiting violations committed by representatives of Naugatuck High School. Instead he received a four-game suspension and is allowed to practice with his Sacred Heart team.

“It's a weight off my shoulders,” said Coggins, who committed to Boston College in July. “I was worried about my future.”

Earlier this month Naugatuck officials reported to the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference that former Naugatuck football coach Rob Plasky gave money to the parents and legal guardians of three Sacred Heart players – Coggins among them – who intended to transfer to Naugatuck.

Plasky resigned once the recruiting allegations surfaced, and all three players remained at Sacred Heart.

“I didn't know my legal guardian took the money,” Coggins said. “I wanted to transfer because I couldn't afford Sacred Heart. Some of that money was for tuition [past due]. Now I have my tuition [reduced].”

Coggins, who missed all of last season with an ankle injury, said he is no longer committed to Boston College.

“It's not out there yet, but I have de-committed from BC,” he said Tuesday night. “I wanted to keep my options open and see what else is out there.”

Coggins caught 78 passes for 1,427 yards and 13 touchdowns as a sophomore. He's made 139 receptions for 2,256 yards and 17 touchdowns in his two years of varsity football.

According to Coggins, Temple and Illinois are among the schools that have shown interest. He also has an offer from Central Connecticut State.

“BC isn't out of the picture,” Coggins said. “I'm hoping more schools call after the season.

On the rise: Anthony Davis is the rarest of the rare. He's a Division I football recruit from the state of Vermont.

Davis wasn't born and bred in the Green Mountain State, but he is spending a post-graduate year at Vermont Academy in Saxons River. After an injury-plagued senior season, he's hoping a year of prep school will increase his college options.

“He was heavily recruited as a junior, but did not play at all last year because he was injured, “ Vermont Academy coach Mike Atkins said. “Recruiting fell off, so he needed another year for that reason, and, academically, to prepare for college.”

Davis, a wide receiver/defensive back, has offers from Bryant and Elon, but Atkins said several Division I schools are showing interest.

“I just called Penn State [Friday] morning because they inquired about him,” Atkins said. “Athletically, he could be at that level, but he's not there yet. He fancies himself as a wide receiver, but I think he's a better defensive back. He's athletic enough where he could make a mistake and still recover from it.

“He will try out for the basketball team, which has five for six Division I-level kids, some who have already committed – that's the kind of athlete he is.”

Going Green: Former Everett quarterback Jonathan DiBiaso has guided Phillips Exeter Academy to a 2-0 start. DiBiaso, the Gatorade Player of the Year in Massachusetts last year, has committed to Dartmouth.

DiBiaso completed 9 of 13 passes for 179 yards and three touchdowns in Saturday's 34-13 victory over Worcester Academy.

“I've only been here a month and I've already learned so much,” DiBiaso said.

DiBiaso picked Dartmouth over Harvard. He also considered Pennsylvania and Holy Cross.

“Once I went on my official visit [to Dartmouth] I was pretty much sold,” he said.

Footnotes: Boston College-bound quarterback Tim Boyle passed for 276 yards and three touchdowns to help Xavier (Middletown, Conn.) defeat North Haven 49-12 last weekend. Xavier, the top-ranked team in Connecticut, has won 28 games in a row. … Bedford (N.H.) senior Will McInerney, a 6-foot-7, 275-pound tackle, has taken on an assistant coach's role this season. McInerney will not play this fall because he had surgery on each knee earlier this year. According to Bedford coach Kurt Hines, the four schools that have made scholarship offers – New Hampshire, Fordham, Wagner and Colgate – have said they will honor those scholarships as long a McInerney passes a physical in the spring.

Recruiting information regarding high school or prep school football players in New England can be sent to Roger Brown at rbrown@nhfootballreport.com.

Cleaning the ice: Summertime hockey notes

August, 8, 2012
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The dog days of summer are upon us, but local rinks are still hopping through August with plenty of great tournaments going on in and around the Boston area.

So we thought we’d take the opportunity to catch up with some of the happenings of local skaters during the offseason, along with a smattering of other notes collected in our notebook during the last month or so.

CLEARING THE CREASE
Bailey MacBurnie burst onto the MIAA hockey scene last season, helping lead St. Mary’s of Lynn to a second seed in the Super 8 tournament. All the while, the Beverly native backstopped the Spartans with a measly 1.66 GAA, placing him among the state leaders.

During the summer, MacBurnie has skated with the New England Thrashers. He and his Thrasher teammates had a solid showing in the recent Chowder Cup College Open championship, finishing fourth in a field of 56 teams while facing teams that largely were comprised of older players.

We caught up with the sophomore netminder to talk about his offseason, how practicing yoga has helped his game and his upcoming season at Brewster Academy:

Q: What kinds of things do you do in the offseason away from the rink to keep you sharp for the upcoming season?

A: “I’ve started doing yoga, it’s my first year doing it. I go to classes at Merrimack College. And then I do on-ice work with Brian Daccord, who’s my goalie coach.”

Q: How do think yoga might help your game?

A: “I’ve found that it’s already made me more flexible. It definitely helps out and gets you in shape.”

Q: What other elements of your game have you wanted to work on this offseason?

A: “Puck handling, definitely. I want to be more confident playing the puck and quicker with making decisions with the puck. And skating, you can always be a better skater.”

Q: Your team had a great showing at the Chowder Cup recently. How did that team come together?

A : “I played with a lot of guys I knew, like [Central Catholic’s] Mike Kelleher, Lloyd Hayes, Zack Cote, Jake Donahue and [former St. Mary’s teammate] Jarrod Fitzpatrick. We had a good tournament. First, we played the Nordiques, beat them 3-1, then we played Mass Attack and beat them, 7-2, and then Team One, 4-2. We played some Canadian teams in the playoffs. We did well though, especially because we were playing a lot of teams that had older players. We thought we should’ve went further, but we were playing against teams that he players that were mostly 92s and 93s [birth dates] and we were mostly 95s.”

HERE AND THERE
  • On the rise: A bumper crop of New England prospects were scooped up earlier this summer during the NHL Draft and the region’s best have continued to crop up during the summertime months. Four players with New England roots were chosen for the U.S. Hockey National Junior Evaluation Camp. Three of those players had their names called in the most recent draft, including goaltender Jon Gillies (South Portland, Maine),defenseman Matt Grzelcyk (Charlestown) and forward Jimmy Vesey (North Reading). Former St. John’s Prep star and 2011 ESPN Boston Mr. Hockey Colin Blackwell (North Reading) also made the final cut for tournament play. Former Phillips Exeter standout and recent Tampa Bay Lightning draft choice Brian Hart was among those participating in camp practices at Lake Placid last week.
  • One to watch: Junior Robby Devaney helped Reading on a late-season Super 8 push last season, while leading the Rockets in scoring during the regular season. While catching Devaney play in both the Bay State Games and the Chowder Cup this summer, he looks like an early candidate for most improved player honorifics – if there were such an award. In the small sample size, he showed good speed, but also exhibited attention to detail, playing solid neutral zone defense in the summertime – something that’s usually missing from offseason tournaments. Of course, we all know how well those Rockets are coached defensively.
  • Comings and goings: One of the more telling aspects of summertime tournaments is often found just looking at team rosters. Players are often listed with their corresponding schools next to their name, and that can often signify changes in locales. One of the more prominent changes listed was that of former Billerica standout Ross Olsson. The Northeastern commit played at Williston Northampton last year, but will move to the USHL, joining the Lincoln Stars, the team that drafted him in May’s entry draft.

New England Roundup: New Hampshire

June, 27, 2012
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Fundraising totals between the teams competing in the inaugural New Hampshire East-West High School Football All-Star Game couldn't have been much closer.

New HampshireThe game itself? That's a different story.

West's all-stars – widely considered underdogs for the June 23 contest at the University of New Hampshire – proved too tough. The combination of overpowering offense and dominant defense led to a 33-point halftime lead and 44-12 final score.

Thaddeus “Junior” Brown was toughest to cover. Manchester Central High's 6-foot 3-inch, 180-pound receiver made all four of his catches for 87 yards in the first half. Three receptions went for touchdowns, including a 50-yard down-the-right-seam dagger that helped Team West build a 37-6 halftime lead.

“This means a lot. I worked hard for it,” Brown, the game's first Bo Dickson MVP, said of the trophy he was handed for his efforts. “The coaches helped me out a lot. I just busted my butt for 10 days. The outcome was this MVP.”

Off the field, the outcome of Brown's efforts, as well as the 73 other all-stars, was even more impressive.

Teams East and West combined to raise $51,301.21 for Children's Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock (CHaD) in Lebanon.

Team East was designated the home team. It earned use of UNH football's locker room for winning the head-to-head fundraising contest. Coach Bill Raycraft's players raised $25,751.21 – a mere $201.21 more than West's standouts.

In total, $301,000 was raised for CHaD.

HS All Star Game
BASCTBD by editorial
“These kids came together and did a heck of a job for a great cause,” said Team West coach Keith Jones, whose 6-year-old son, Harris, a CHaD patient, participated in the pre-game coin toss.

Harris was involved in a freak snowmobile accident three years ago. His father has said many times if not for CHaD, right-leg amputation would have been required.

On gameday, the soon-to-be first-grader made an appearance in Team West's locker room prior to warm-ups. It gave the players an additional boost, which carried over to kickoff.

Several playmakers fueled Team West's 37-point first half.

Brown caught a pair of 9-yard TD passes from Manchester West High's Aaron Martin, who also used his speed to sneak inside the left pylon for a 2-yard rushing score.

Merrimack High's Jackson King returned an interception 19-yards for a TD.

Nashua South's Johnny Bieren was crucial to posting a second-quarter safety. He also forced and recovered a fumble on one of his three quarterback sacks.

Central's Stephen Grzywacz – who raised a players-best $5,965 for CHaD – converted five extra points (6-for-6 overall).

East's all-stars committed five of the game's eight turnovers. The favored squad fell behind, 30-0, before Salem High's Jerickson Fedrick returned a kickoff 96 yards to paydirt.

Fedrick, and Pinkerton Academy of Derry stars Kevin Davies and Emmitt Smith, were all neutralized. Combining to rush for 4,649 yards and 57 TDs last fall, the trio managed 99 yards – 28 through two quarters.

Conor Donovan of Division VI cooperative team Inter-Lakes-Moultonborough scored East's second TD early in the third. Derek Paradis of Nashua South answered with an up-the-gut run.

“The first series, I thought we did pretty well. We stopped them (but) right away turned the ball over,” Raycraft said. “That's not the way you want to start an all-star game. From there, we pressed a little bit more than we probably should have and, because of that, created more turnovers.

“But, like I told the kids, I had a blast these last (10) days,” he added. “I couldn't have asked for a better group of kids. It's going to be fun watching where they go from here. The score will fade, but they set the tone for fundraising.”

BASEBALL CHAMPS
Division I: Dillon Emerson's extra-inning hit snapped two droughts, including a lengthy one for Concord High.

The senior's single down the right-field line scored Pat Cannon and gave the top-seeded Crimson Tide a 5-4 walk-off win over No. 3 seed Merrimack High in the state final June 16 at Northeast Delta Dental Stadium, home of Double-A baseball's New Hampshire Fisher Cats.

Emerson's hit snapped an 0-for-4 skid in the title game and earned Concord (18-4) its first crown since 1980. The Tide lost the state final in 2011.

“I was in the dugout upset over all the missed opportunities I had when coach [Scott Owen] came up to me and said, 'Stick with it. You'll get your at-bat and you'll come through.' He was right,” Emerson told the New Hampshire Sunday News.

(Read full post)

Locals taken during Day 2 of NHL Draft

June, 23, 2012
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Day 2 of the NHL Draft took place Saturday morning, and while there weren't any locals taken in Friday's first round, a host of New Englanders had their named called in the subsequent rounds.

Here's a rap sheet of those with New England roots who've been taken:

2ND ROUND
53. Tampa Bay Lightning - Brian Hart, Phillips Exeter, RW
56. St. Louis Blues - Sam Kurker, St. John's Prep, RW
59. New York Rangers - Cristoval "Boo" Nieves, Kent School, C

3RD ROUND
66. Nashville Predators - Jimmy Vesey, South Shore Kings (Belmont Hill), LW
75. Calgary Flames - Jon Gillies, Indiana Ice (USHL, South Portland, Maine), G
79. Chicago Blackhawks - Chris Calnan, Noble and Greenough, RW
85. Boston Bruins - Matt Grzelcyk, U.S. NTDP (Charlestown, Mass.), D

4TH ROUND
98. Minnesota Wild - Adam Gilmour, Noble and Greenough, C
106. Ottawa Senators - Tim Boyle, Noble and Greenough, D

5TH ROUND
125. New York Islanders - Doyle Somerby, Kimball Union (St. Mary's of Lynn), D
136. Ottawa Senators - Robbie Baillargeon, Indiana Ice (USHL, Enfield, Conn. via Cushing Academy), C
138. San Jose Sharks - Danny O'Regan, St. Sebastian's, C

7TH ROUND
189. Carolina Hurricanes - Brendan Collier, Malden Catholic, LW
The NHL Draft commences tonight in Pittsburgh and there is a host of New England-based high school, prep school and junior league players who hope hear their name called in the next two days.

Sam Kurker
Scott BarbozaMalden Catholic forward and ESPN Boston Mr. Hockey award winner Brendan Collier could be a sleeper in this weekend's NHL draft.
More than 20 local players were represented on the NHL Central Scouting’s final draft rankings, released in April. So we took the task to the Northeast regional scouts of an Eastern and a Western Conference team to give their evaluations of some of New England’s best and brightest.

The region is moving into somewhat of a renaissance. Folks might like to wax about the good ole days, but there’s plenty of talent to be found around the local ponds right now. That fact was not lost on Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli, who earlier this week during his annual pre-draft media availability, spoke about this year’s bumper crop.

“It is fairly deep,” Chiarelli said. “It’s the deepest that I’ve seen since I’ve been here and that’s a good sign. It’s a good sign that the registration numbers – usually, it means they’re going up – and obviously the quality of players for the NHL is increasing, too.”

So here’s a look at some of the local skaters to watch out for and their scouting evaluation.

(Players appear by NHL Central Scouting ranking among North American skaters.)

27. Cristoval "Boo" Nieves, Kent School, C
Scout’s take: “He’s an incredible skater, a tall, rangy kid. He’s more of a playmaker than a goal-scorer and finisher, but that’s what his role is, a playmaking-center man. His skating ability is as good or as close to as good as you’ll find in this draft.”

36. Sam Kurker, St. John's Prep, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got great size, a big strong kid. He’s a great straight-line skater up and down the wing. [He’s got a] big, hard shot and she shows a willingness to play in the hard areas in front of the net, in the corners on the wall.”

54. Brian Hart, Phillips Exeter, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got a huge shot. He’s real strong on the wall. He’s a very strong skater, in flight, he can really move.

Scout’s take on his soccer prowess as New Hampshire’s reigning Gatorade Player of the Year: “You know that overall athletes usually make the best players in whatever sport they decide on.”

69. Chris Calnan, Noble & Greenough, RW
Scout’s take: “Got better and better as the year went on. He started to play physical and use the body, which I think is everybody was waiting to see. He’s got a bomb of a shot. And he’s got a commitment to BC now, that was nice to see.”

Chiarelli’s take: “I mean there are some good kids in the prep leagues and the Calnan kid’s a good player – a big strong kid – very physically mature, power-forward type.”

76. Danny O'Regan, St. Sebastian's, C
Scout’s take: “He’s a smaller, undersized forward, but plays with a ton of hockey sense. He’s very strong on his skates and plays with a little bit of jam. His intelligence and hockey sense really stick out.”

77. Jimmy Vesey, South Shore Kings/ Belmont Hill, LW
Scout’s take: “The best player in the area. I don’t care where it’s at, 100 points is a 100 points [scored with the Kings last season]. He grew a few inches and he’s just coming into his own. Harvard stole him. BC and BU were sleepwalking on him. He slid through draft last year, but I thought someone would take a shot. Someone’s going to be happy with him this year.”

Chiarelli’s take: “You’ve got in the EJ [Eastern Junior Hockey League], you’ve got the Vesey kid’s a good player. He’s second time through the draft, but very skilled, had a breakout year there, can really make some really good plays with the puck, whether it’s shooting or passing.”

79. Devin Tringale, Lawrence Academy, LW
Scout’s take: “Talk about a vastly underrated player. I think he’s going to go later than he should, but someone’s going to get a steal in this draft. He’s going to be a big asset at Harvard when he gets there.”

88. Frank Vatrano, USA U-18 (East Longmeadow, Mass.), C
Scout’s take: “If you were to put him in the Catholic Conference or prep school hockey, he’s a 50-goal scorer. He’s got an NHL shot right now, he’s got such a quick release. He’s very hard to knock off the puck. He’s become a very good hockey player [with Team USA].”

99. Doyle Somerby, Kimball Union, D
Scout’s take: “He’s got great size, as a forward turned D-man, so he’s a pretty good puck mover. He’s more of a stay-at-home defenseman, but a big, rangy kid. Good smooth stride for a kid his size and good speed in flight.”

101. Adam Gilmour, Noble & Greenough, RW
Scout’s take: “He’s got high skill, sets guys up. He’s going to get stronger. He’s a tall lanky kid. He’ll go to BC and that’s his type of game, playing a type of run-and-gun game, he’ll do fine there.”

143. Brendan Collier, Malden Catholic, LW
Scout’s take: “We hear this about him, he’s just a pure hockey player. Goal line to goal line, he works so hard, got a good compete level. I think he’s going to be a great college player. He’s got some potential because he just works so hard.”

Chiarelli’s take: “A couple of interesting one’s, the Collier kid, [he is] kind of under the radar a little bit, but a real gritty kid.”

177. Matthew Grzelcyk, USA U-18 (Charlestown, Mass.), D
Scout’s take: "I love him. His hockey IQ is up there with kids who are taken in the top 15 in the draft. If had to pick one kid to make the right play getting out of the zone, it’s him. He thinks the game. He finds the seams. He’s a hockey player. I think he’ll be running the PP at BU last year. He’s that David Warsofsky, Matt Hunwick type of player.”

Chiarelli’s take: “You’ve got some kids that kind of went to the U.S. Development Program but are from the area. The Grzelcyk kid’s a very good, mobile defenseman. He’s later on down but he’s got a good head on his shoulders.”

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