Grantland: Speaking the Patriots' language

January, 16, 2013
1/16/13
4:59
PM ET
In a heavy-on-the-X's-and-O's piece now posted on Grantland.com, Chris Brown of SmartFootball.com explains how the Patriots run their offense. Specifically, he writes of how the Erhardt-Perkins system of play-calling has driven the success of the Patriots' offense even as personnel and schemes have changed. Here's an excerpt:

New England’s offense is a member of the NFL’s third offensive family, the Erhardt-Perkins system. The offense was named after the two men, Ron Erhardt and Ray Perkins, who developed it while working for the Patriots under head coach Chuck Fairbanks in the 1970s. According to Perkins, it was assembled in the same way most such systems are developed. “I don’t look at it as us inventing it,” he explained. “I look at it as a bunch of coaches sitting in rooms late at night organizing and getting things together to help players be successful.”

The backbone of the Erhardt-Perkins system is that plays — pass plays in particular — are not organized by a route tree or by calling a single receiver’s route, but by what coaches refer to as “concepts.” Each play has a name, and that name conjures up an image for both the quarterback and the other players on offense. And, most importantly, the concept can be called from almost any formation or set. Who does what changes, but the theory and tactics driving the play do not. “In essence, you’re running the same play,” said Perkins. “You’re just giving them some window-dressing to make it look different.”
Read the full piece HERE.

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