Pacquiao: 'Freddie has been a father to me'

April, 8, 2014
Apr 8
10:12
AM ET
Two years removed from the most controversial fight of his 19-year professional career, Manny Pacquiao is focused on getting a chance to set the record straight against Timothy Bradley Jr.

The rematch, set for Saturday in Las Vegas (HBO PPV), marks the first time the fighters will meet since their June 2012 bout -- won by Bradley via split decision -- which produced some of the most contentious scorecards in modern history.

Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38 KOs), 35, enters the bout one fight removed from a wide unanimous-decision win over Brandon Rios in November -- a fight that served as a comeback for Pacquiao following his December 2012 knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez.

Describe a typical day in and out the gym. Your relationship with your coach Freddie Roach. You dine together, watch film together?

I train Monday through Saturday every week of training camp. It is a strict schedule that allows my body to rest between morning and afternoon sessions so that I can perform my training at my best. Everything is geared to one goal, peaking physically and mentally on April 12 -- fight day.

At sunrise, I usually head over to one of three areas that I rotate and run several miles. I no longer run hills every day, and that has eliminated the leg cramps I had suffered from, beginning with my fight with Shane Mosley in 2011. After my run, Justin Fortune, who is my strength and conditioning coach, runs me though a series of drills that are designed to improve my speed and agility. By 8 a.m., I return home for breakfast with my camp and then a take a nap.

I usually arrive at Wild Card Boxing Club at 1 p.m. for a three-hour session with Freddie. Sparring takes place Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays while I work the mitts with Freddie every day. Then it’s a circuit on the double-end bag, the heavy bag, the speed bag, jumping rope and hundreds of situps. The session ends with strength drills with Justin. It’s during the afternoon session that Freddie and I interact and discuss, design and execute our strategy for defeating Tim Bradley. We know what we have to do to beat him.

After training we go to a Thai restaurant near the gym for lunch and then head back home where I relax, play chess with my friends or watch a movie a home, followed by dinner. After dinner I read the Bible or discuss it with my friends, and I’m usually in bed by 10 p.m.

Freddie has been a father to me, a brother and a best friend since the day we met. I cannot overstate his importance to me and how much he has impacted my life. I am a better person for having Freddie in my life. We are a team. In the gym, I call him Master Freddie. He is the boss and he is the teacher. And even though we do not spend as much time together as we used to, we will always have a special bond that will remain strong for the rest of our lives.

Bradley: Pacquiao 'lost the fire'

April, 8, 2014
Apr 8
10:12
AM ET
Unbeaten welterweight titlist Timothy Bradley Jr., 30, has done nothing but grow as a fighter in the two years since his controversial June 2012 victory over Manny Pacquiao.

Bradley (31-0, 12 KOs) survived a toe-to-toe war with Ruslan Provodnikov in March 2013 before outboxing slick counterpuncher Juan Manuel Marques in October.

A native of Palm Springs, Calif., Bradley returns Saturday (HBO PPV) for a second go-around with Pacquiao in Las Vegas. Bradley's split-decision victory in their first bout went down as one of the most controversial decisions in modern boxing history.

In what ways do you think Pacquiao has changed as a fighter during the two years since your first fight against him?

Manny Pacquiao has always been a great fighter and from what I have heard he is a great person, but I think in the last two years Manny has become a more compassionate fighter. I think he lost the fire that made him the No. 1 pound-for-pound fighter in the world.

That killer instinct that made Oscar De La Hoya quit on his stool and the fire that knocked out Miguel Cotto, Ricky Hatton and badly damaged Antonio Margarito are just no longer there.

I think his skill set is still there, but he just cannot turn it on like he used to anymore. In the Brandon Rios fight, I saw he had Rios up against the ropes and then he stopped throwing his punches. He took a couple steps back and let Rios out.

I think that Marquez KO gave him a lot to think about because Manny was turning it on there, and in my opinion he was a couple rounds away from stopping Marquez -- but then he just never saw Marquez's right hand coming and it was lights-out.

I hope come April 12 Manny can find that fire and be the Pacquiao of old because this is the hurt business. For those 36 minutes that we will be in the ring, I am not expecting any compassion from him.

He will get absolutely no compassion from me. In that ring it is all about my family eating or his family eating.

Manny Pacquiao will have to knock me out to stop my family from eating.

Cunningham rallies to outlast Mansour

April, 5, 2014
Apr 5
1:20
AM ET
Steve CunninghamRich Graessle/Main EventsSteve Cunningham rebounded from a pair of knockdowns in Round 5 to outpoint Amir Mansour.
With his family in need and his heavyweight future hanging in the balance on Friday, veteran Steve Cunningham was forced to dig deep against unbeaten brawler Amir Mansour.

Then, with the fight hanging in the balance entering the 10th and final round, the 37-year-old reached back for even more.

Cunningham, who was lucky to survive a pair of brutal knockdowns in Round 5, rallied to score one of his own in Round 10 to secure an exciting, unanimous-decision win over Mansour at the Liacouras Center on the campus of Temple University in Philadelphia.

Fighting in front of his home fans for just the second time in his career -- and first since 2003 -- Cunningham (27-6, 12 KOs) needed every bit of support to earn the victory, by scores of 97-90 and 95-92 (twice). ESPN.com also had it 95-92 for Cunningham.

The win was extra sweet considering the two-time cruiserweight titlist was fighting for money to help pay the medical bills of his 8-year-old daughter Kennedy, who was born with a congenital heart defect.

"I've got faith, it's all I have," Cunningham said. "I don't have strength, I don't have speed. I have faith in my God."

Fighting against big-name competition for the first time in his career, Mansour, 41, utilized his raw and aggressive style to land a series of wild left hands to take control of the early rounds. Mansour (20-1, 15 KOs) wobbled Cunningham in Round 2 and cut him on the bridge of his nose.

But it was Round 5 when Mansour appeared ready to end the fight. He floored Cunningham on a hard right hook to the chin and later added a second knockdown in the closing seconds following a flurry of right hands.

Referee Steve Smoger gave Cunningham every opportunity to beat the 10 count, and he was lucky to make it out of the round.

"I was all right. I've been down before and got up and won," Cunningham said. "I got lackadaisical because I was really doing my thing. I won't make that mistake again."

Fighting on wobbly legs in Round 6, Cunningham courageously began to bank rounds behind his boxing ability as he made an increasingly wild Mansour miss repeatedly before countering with his right hand.

But with Mansour's eyes badly swollen and his balance and technique gone by Round 10, Cunningham sealed his comeback by dropping his exhausted opponent with a flush overhand right.

"I was getting in there and talking to him and using mind tricks," said Cunningham, who outlanded Mansour 117 to 110, according to CompuBox. "He wasn't built for 'USS' Cunningham."

Stevens stops Johnson in final round



Trailing on all three scorecards, hard-hitting Curtis Stevens entered the final round against unbeaten Tureano Johnson in need of something dramatic.

He got it.

[+] EnlargeCurtis Stevens
Larry Levanti/Main EventsCurtis Stevens rescued victory from the jaws of defeat with a 10th-round TKO.
In a stay-busy fight that had quickly turned into a nightmare, Stevens provided a dramatic finish to a sure-fire fight of the year candidate by rallying to score a TKO over Johnson at 2:09 of Round 10.

Both fighters had repeatedly traded heavy punches at close range for nine grueling rounds. But Stevens (27-4, 20 KOs) was finally able to break a determined Johnson by badly hurting him with a left hook in the final round.

Stevens responded with a flurry of punches, including a hard right hand as Johnson was pinned against the ropes, causing referee Gary Rosato to jump in and wave off the fight. The stoppage elicited a series of boos from the Philadelphia crowd, which felt it was too early.

Johnson (14-1, 10 KOs), 30, who forced Stevens to fight at a breakneck pace from the opening bell by smothering him and attacking to the body, was ahead by scores of 87-84 and 89-82 (twice) at the time of the stoppage.

"I was looking for the knockout so much I never set it up the way I was supposed to," Stevens said. "But it came, better late than never. He smothered me a lot. He did what he was supposed to.

"But I got the knockout late and did what I was supposed to do."

Stevens hurt Johnson with a series of heavy right hands in Round 5 but was unable to take over the fight at any point. Johnson, who set the tone in Round 1 by attacking and turning the fight into a brawl, showed a tremendous chin by trading toe-to-toe with Stevens throughout and simply outworking his opponent.

Bradley: 'I will be hungrier than Pacquiao'

April, 1, 2014
Apr 1
10:53
AM ET
In the two years since his controversial June 2012 victory over Manny Pacquiao, unbeaten welterweight titlist Timothy Bradley Jr. has done nothing but grow as a fighter.

Bradley (31-0, 12 KOs), 30, survived a toe-to-toe war with Ruslan Provodnikov in March 2013 before outboxing slick counterpuncher Juan Manuel Marques in October.

But the native of Palm Springs, Calif., returns April 12 in Las Vegas (HBO PPV) for a second go-around with Pacquiao. Bradley's split-decision victory in their first bout went down as one of the most controversial decisions in modern history.

Juan Manuel Marquez had to knock out Pacquiao to get a definitive result. Is that what you need to do? How do you accomplish this? How do you beat Pacquiao?

Marquez was in a little bit of a bigger hole when he knocked him out. He had fought him three times and was not able to secure a win in any of the first three fights. He had tried everything and had failed, so a knockout was the only way he would win.

I am in a slightly different position than Marquez was. I have already beat Pacquiao once, and that was on my first try. I don't think I have to knock him out to get a definite result, but, if the knockout presents itself, I will take advantage of it.

The first fight, I injured my foot in the second round and by the fourth round my ankle on my other foot was also messed up. The second half of the fight, I was coming on strong with two bad feet.

I didn't have the movement that I normally have, and I was outworking him. I was fighting all three minutes of every round and not just the last thirty seconds of every round.

This second fight against Manny Pacquiao, I will pick up right where I left off the first fight. This will just be rounds 13 through 24.

I was able to show my boxing ability against Marquez with two good feet, so this will be no different. I will be faster than Pacquiao, I will have better defense than Pacquiao, I will be hungrier than Pacquiao.

I have been in the ring with Pacquiao, so I know exactly what to expect. There are a few adjustments that I will make and with two good feet under me, and, at the end of the night, I will be victorious again!

And still...




Bradley: 'This is my chance at redemption' (Posted on March 26)


Talk about the frustration of winning the biggest fight of your life (first fight against Pacquiao) and not getting the recognition that goes with that.

Well, as many know, the first Pacquiao fight I was just supposed to be another opponent for the great Manny Pacquiao. Not many people gave me a chance to come out victorious, especially not after the type of winning streak that he had been on. His previous seven fights, Pacquiao had beaten and/or destroyed Juan Manuel Marquez, Sugar Shane Mosley, Antonio Margarito, Joshua Clottey, Miguel Cotto, Ricky Hatton and Oscar de la Hoya.

No one thought I had what it took to beat Manny Pacquiao. So, when I did edge out the decision, I never got the credit I deserved. I busted my butt in training camp, as I always do for any fight, but this was the biggest fight in my career, so I pushed that much harder to prove to the world that I could beat Manny Pacquiao.

When the decision was announced that I had done enough to beat Manny, no one could believe what had happened -- and hardly anyone knew the physical conditions that I had gone through during the fight.

Beating Pacquiao was supposed to be the turning point in who Timothy Bradley really is, but instead it became a very dark point and time in my life. The boos turned into hatred and then hatred turned into death threats. I felt I had done enough to beat Pacquiao, but everyone was out to prove that I hadn't.

This was supposed to be my night, but instead it turned into a night where an icon not only lost but was also "robbed" by me. Everyone sat there in shock without realizing that I had just done what I set myself to do. No one stopped for a second and acknowledged my accomplishment.

Although I am certain I won the fight, it is now time to once again show the world who Timothy Bradley really is. On April 12, we will settle for once and for all the uncertainty of boxing followers and those of the fans.

This is my chance at redemption, and I promise I will make the most of it.




Bradley: 'Nothing can stop me' (Posted on March 20)


Discuss 2013 and how your fights against Provodnikov and Marquez solidified you as one of the top pound-for-pound fighters in the world.

The year 2013 was a great one for me. I started out the year fighting a guy who wasn't very well known outside the boxing community by the name of Ruslan Provodnikov. You might have heard of him by now since our fight was voted fight of the year by the Boxing Writers of America. Ruslan has also gone on to win a junior welterweight title and has moved into many people's top 10 pound-for-pound lists.

My second fight of 2013 was against a current top five pound-for-pound guy that had just come off of the knockout of the year against Manny Pacquiao, the future Hall of Famer Juan Manuel Marquez. This fight, unlike the Provodnikov fight, was a chess match and I believe I gave Juan Manuel Marquez a boxing lesson.

With these two fights I was able to show that I can outbox a top-five pound-for-pound boxer and I could also go toe to toe with one of the most feared punchers in the sport. I was able to show the fans that I am a versatile fighter and can box and brawl as needed. I believe that being a top pound-for-pound fighter means that you have to do whatever it takes to win whether it's outbox your opponent or fight your opponent blow for blow in the center of the ring. I am out to prove that I am one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the sport, if not the best.

In my two fights in 2013 I was able to show that I can do it all in the sport of boxing. This next fight will be no different in helping me show the fans that I am top pound for pound in the world. I have a lot to prove and nothing can stop me on my way to being No. 1 in the world.

Pacquiao: 'I intend to prove I'm the best'

April, 1, 2014
Apr 1
10:34
AM ET
Two years removed from the most controversial fight of his 19-year professional career, Manny Pacquiao is focused on getting a chance to set the record straight against Timothy Bradley Jr.

The rematch, set for April 12 in Las Vegas (HBO PPV), marks the first time the fighters will meet since their June 2012 bout -- won by Bradley via split decision -- which produced some of the most contentious scorecards in modern history.

Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38 KOs), 35, enters the bout one fight removed from a wide unanimous-decision win over Brandon Rios in November -- a fight that served as a comeback for Pacquiao following his December 2012 knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez.

How did you deal with the bad decision after the fight? How long does it take to get over that? What's different in training this time around knowing you can achieve revenge?

That is boxing. It is part of the game and you cannot let yourself get too upset over it or else it will consume you. Judges are human. You cannot expect them to be perfect.

In the first fight against Tim Bradley, I was over it before I returned to the dressing room. To Freddie Roach and me, and apparently everyone else who watched the fight -- except for two [judges] -- I won the fight. The first thing I said to Freddie when we saw each other in the dressing after the fight was, ‘He [Bradley] ran just like we knew he would.’ We never discussed or debated the decision because it was so obvious that I had won the fight and nearly every round.

It never felt like a loss to me and no one treated me any differently. I was treated as the winner. I just moved forward and began training for my next fight, which was against Juan Manuel Marquez.

There is something different in this training camp. There are a lot of people who doubt I can fight the same way I fought when I knocked out Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Erik Morales and Marco Antonio Barrera. I want to prove to them that I am the best. I am inspired. I am the challenger. I know I will need to outbox and outspeed Bradley. And that is what I will do. This is the first time I have challenged for a world title that I lost. Do I want it back? You bet I do. And I want it back from Tim Bradley.




Pacquiao: 'I love competition, I love to win' (Posted on March 26)

At 35, how has your motivation to compete changed from earlier in your career?

My motivation is the same now as it was when I started my boxing career. I love competition and I love to win. When that stops, so does my professional boxing career. But I don't see that happening for a long time.

Because I am facing Tim Bradley again I am extra motivated for this fight. I may not have won the decision the first time we fought but I know I did not lose that fight. I want the world title he won from me back around my waist. I want to prove I am the better fighter.

Freddie Roach and Justin Fortune are asking more from me in this training camp than I have ever given before and as hard as that is to do, I am giving them everything they have asked of me. Too much is at stake for me and for my country. I want to end my career on a winning streak and against the best fighters.

No one has ever defeated Tim Bradley during his professional career. I want to be the first name in his loss column. It will not be easy. Nothing at the world championship level is easy. I still have the hunger and the desire to win and I appreciate Tim Bradley giving me this rematch to prove it. Unfortunately for him, on April 12, I will not be able to repay him that favor with kindness.




Pacquiao: 'I intend to win all the rounds' (Posted on March 20)


The perception is that you sacrificed punching power against Rios in favor of speed in order to outbox him. How much did the result of the Marquez fight impact your strategy against Rios? What will be your strategy against Bradley?

I was very happy with my performance against Brandon Rios. Speed has always been a major weapon for me and I used it throughout the fight against Rios for one simple reason -- it was working. The power is still there and I used it effectively against Rios to keep him off balance. [Trainer] Freddie [Roach] and I came up with the game plan to mix things up against Rios. I would utilize my speed and foot movement in boxing him to keep him off balance. Then when he would come in out of frustration I would land the power punches.

The one thing I learned from my fight against Marquez was patience. When I had him teetering I became reckless and went in to finish him. I was careless and he landed the perfect punch. That was learning a lesson the hard way. But I learned it. I still have the killer instinct. I am not afraid to use my power and go for the knockout. But I will remember the lesson I learned from my last fight with Marquez. Knockouts need to come naturally, you should not force them. But Freddie likes knockouts and I like to make Freddie happy.

I won at least 10 rounds against Tim Bradley the first time we fought. I intend to win all the rounds against him this time regardless of the length of the fight. He said I have lost my hunger and that my time is over. Everything I am doing in training camp is aimed at proving to him just how wrong he is. I have all the respect for Bradley and what he has accomplished but I have no fear of him. He has inspired me to exceed my previous performances inside the ring. If Bradley wants to meet the fighter who stopped Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Erik Morales and Marco Antonio Barrera, he's going to get his wish on April 12.

Boxcino lightweights enter semifinals

March, 27, 2014
Mar 27
8:26
PM ET
With a pair of explosive semifinals bouts on tap Friday in the 2014 Boxcino lightweight tournament, one can expect plenty of action at the 4 Bears Casino in New Town, N.D.

A pair of eight-round bouts will headline ESPN's "Friday Night Fights" (ESPN, 9 p.m. ET) as Chris Rudd meets Petr Petrov and Miguel Gonzalez squares off with Fernando Carcamo.

All four fighters were victorious in the Boxcino quarterfinals held Feb. 21 in Laughlin, Nev., with Carcamo scoring the lone stoppage win.

Chris Rudd (13-1, eight KOs) vs. Petr Petrov (33-4-2, 15 KOs)

Both fighters advanced to the semifinal round after winning extremely hard-fought battles in bouts in which neither was the prohibitive favorite coming in. In Rudd's case, he needed an extra round to pull through as his bout with Ghana's Yakubu Amidu was ruled a draw after six full rounds, sending the fight to a one-round "drawbreaker." Rudd, who had fought just once in the previous two years entering the bout, showed plenty of courage after absorbing heavy punishment in the opening round. He went on to rally in the fourth round as the bout turned exceedingly into an all-action affair.

Petrov, meanwhile, a native of Russia who fights out of Spain, entered his quarterfinal bout against countryman Fedor Papazov having been most remembered for being knocked out Marcos Maidana in 2011. But those who expected to see him end up on the canvas against Papzov, whose nickname is "Mr. Knockout," were surprised by the outcome, as Petrov walked through heavy punishment to land precision counter shots. He went on to claim a victory by unanimous decision.

Friday's semifinal bout is expected to be an attractive clash of styles. Rudd, the more aggressive fighter, has won six of his past 10 fights by knockout and will surely be active from the outset. But Petrov, a former world-title challenger at 140 pounds, brings with him 14 years of experience and is better equipped than Rudd from a technical standpoint.

Miguel Gonzalez (23-3, 16 KOs) vs. Fernando Carcamo (16-5, 13 KOs)

This battle of southpaws has the potential for an uncertain outcome. Carcamo, 23, of Mexico, lived up to his reputation as a hard puncher in the quarterfinal round by stopping unbeaten Samuel Neequaye of Ghana. Carcamo overwhelmed his opponent from the start with relentless pressure until referee Jay Nady mercifully stopped the fight in the second round. The marked the sixth in a row for Carcamo by way of stoppage.

Gonzalez, of Cleveland, had to work harder in his opening bout to overcome Miguel Mendoza by majority decision. The victory confirmed Gonzalez is on the right track in his career as he was forced to overcome a late surge from Mendoza, who refused to quit after falling behind early.

Carcamo, an aggressive fighter, will enter the fight with a decided advantage in punching power. He will likely look to set the pace from the start and try to finish the fight early. However, he should take precautions, or he could run into a surprise.

Pacquiao: 'I love competition, I love to win'

March, 26, 2014
Mar 26
2:06
PM ET
Two years removed from the most controversial fight of his 19-year professional career, Manny Pacquiao is focused on getting a chance to set the record straight against Timothy Bradley Jr.

The rematch, set for April 12 in Las Vegas (HBO PPV), marks the first time the fighters will meet since their June 2012 bout -- won by Bradley via split decision -- which produced some of the most contentious scorecards in modern history.

Pacquiao (55-5-2, 38 KOs), 35, enters the bout one fight removed from a wide unanimous-decision win over Brandon Rios in November -- a fight that served as a comeback for Pacquiao following his December 2012 knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez.

At 35, how has your motivation to compete changed from earlier in your career?

My motivation is the same now as it was when I started my boxing career. I love competition and I love to win. When that stops, so does my professional boxing career. But I don't see that happening for a long time.

Because I am facing Tim Bradley again I am extra motivated for this fight. I may not have won the decision the first time we fought but I know I did not lose that fight. I want the world title he won from me back around my waist. I want to prove I am the better fighter.

Freddie Roach and Justin Fortune are asking more from me in this training camp than I have ever given before and as hard as that is to do, I am giving them everything they have asked of me. Too much is at stake for me and for my country. I want to end my career on a winning streak and against the best fighters.

No one has ever defeated Tim Bradley during his professional career. I want to be the first name in his loss column. It will not be easy. Nothing at the world championship level is easy. I still have the hunger and the desire to win and I appreciate Tim Bradley giving me this rematch to prove it. Unfortunately for him, on April 12, I will not be able to repay him that favor with kindness.




Pacquiao: 'I intend to win all the rounds' (Posted on March 20)


The perception is that you sacrificed punching power against Rios in favor of speed in order to outbox him. How much did the result of the Marquez fight impact your strategy against Rios? What will be your strategy against Bradley?

I was very happy with my performance against Brandon Rios. Speed has always been a major weapon for me and I used it throughout the fight against Rios for one simple reason -- it was working. The power is still there and I used it effectively against Rios to keep him off balance. [Trainer] Freddie [Roach] and I came up with the game plan to mix things up against Rios. I would utilize my speed and foot movement in boxing him to keep him off balance. Then when he would come in out of frustration I would land the power punches.

The one thing I learned from my fight against Marquez was patience. When I had him teetering I became reckless and went in to finish him. I was careless and he landed the perfect punch. That was learning a lesson the hard way. But I learned it. I still have the killer instinct. I am not afraid to use my power and go for the knockout. But I will remember the lesson I learned from my last fight with Marquez. Knockouts need to come naturally, you should not force them. But Freddie likes knockouts and I like to make Freddie happy.

I won at least 10 rounds against Tim Bradley the first time we fought. I intend to win all the rounds against him this time regardless of the length of the fight. He said I have lost my hunger and that my time is over. Everything I am doing in training camp is aimed at proving to him just how wrong he is. I have all the respect for Bradley and what he has accomplished but I have no fear of him. He has inspired me to exceed my previous performances inside the ring. If Bradley wants to meet the fighter who stopped Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton, Erik Morales and Marco Antonio Barrera, he's going to get his wish on April 12.

Bradley: 'This is my chance at redemption'

March, 26, 2014
Mar 26
2:06
PM ET
In the two years since his controversial June 2012 victory over Manny Pacquiao, unbeaten welterweight titlist Timothy Bradley Jr. has done nothing but grow as a fighter.

Bradley (31-0, 12 KOs), 30, survived a toe-to-toe war with Ruslan Provodnikov in March 2013 before outboxing slick counterpuncher Juan Manuel Marques in October.

But the native of Palm Springs, Calif., returns April 12 in Las Vegas (HBO PPV) for a second go-around with Pacquiao. Bradley's split-decision victory in their first bout went down as one of the most controversial decisions in modern history.

Talk about the frustration of winning the biggest fight of your life (first fight against Pacquiao) and not getting the recognition that goes with that.

Well as many know the first Pacquiao fight I was just supposed to be another opponent for the great Manny Pacquiao. Not many people gave me a chance to come out victorious especially not after the type of winning streak that he had been on. His previous seven fights Pacquiao had beaten and/or destroyed Juan Manuel Marquez, Sugar Shane Mosley, Antonio Margarito, Joshua Clottey, Miguel Cotto, Ricky Hatton and Oscar de la Hoya.

No one thought I had what it took to beat Manny Pacquiao. So when I did edge out the decision I never got the credit I deserved. I busted my butt in training camp as I always do for any fight but this was the biggest fight in my career so I pushed that much harder to prove to the world that I could beat Manny Pacquiao.

When the decision was announced that I had done enough to beat Manny no one could believe what had happened -- and hardly anyone knew the physical conditions that I had gone through during the fight.

Beating Pacquiao was supposed to be the turning point in who Timothy Bradley really is but instead it became a very dark point and time in my life. The boos turned into hatred and then hatred turned into death threats. I felt I had done enough to beat Paquiao but everyone was out to prove that I hadn't.

This was supposed to be my night but instead it turned into a night where an icon not only lost but was also "robbed" by me. Everyone sat there in shocked without realizing that I had just done what I set myself to do. No one stopped for a second and acknowledge my accomplishment.

Although I am certain I won the fight it is now time to once again show the world who Timothy Bradley really is. On April 12 we will settle for once and for all the uncertainty of boxing followers and those of the fans.

This is my chance at redemption and I promise I will make the most of it.




Nothing can stop me (Posted on March 20)


Discuss 2013 and how your fights against Provodnikov and Marquez solidified you as one of the top pound-for-pound fighters in the world.

The year 2013 was a great one for me. I started out the year fighting a guy who wasn't very well known outside the boxing community by the name of Ruslan Provodnikov. You might have heard of him by now since our fight was voted fight of the year by the Boxing Writers of America. Ruslan has also gone on to win a junior welterweight title and has moved into many people's top 10 pound-for-pound lists.

My second fight of 2013 was against a current top five pound-for-pound guy that had just come off of the knockout of the year against Manny Pacquiao, the future Hall of Famer Juan Manuel Marquez. This fight, unlike the Provodnikov fight, was a chess match and I believe I gave Juan Manuel Marquez a boxing lesson.

With these two fights I was able to show that I can outbox a top-five pound-for-pound boxer and I could also go toe to toe with one of the most feared punchers in the sport. I was able to show the fans that I am a versatile fighter and can box and brawl as needed. I believe that being a top pound-for-pound fighter means that you have to do whatever it takes to win whether it's outbox your opponent or fight your opponent blow for blow in the center of the ring. I am out to prove that I am one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the sport, if not the best.

In my two fights in 2013 I was able to show that I can do it all in the sport of boxing. This next fight will be no different in helping me show the fans that I am top pound for pound in the world. I have a lot to prove and nothing can stop me on my way to being No. 1 in the world.

Fresh start for Martirosyan on FNF

March, 19, 2014
Mar 19
7:03
PM ET
Former U.S. Olympian and world title challenger Vanes Martirosyan sets forth to begin a new chapter in his career Friday when he faces Mexican knockout artist Mario Alberto Lozano.

The 10-round junior middleweight bout headlines ESPN's "Friday Night Fights" (ESPN2, 9 p.m. ET) from the Morongo Casino Resort & Spa in Cabazon, Calif.

Much has changed for Martirosyan (32-1-1, 20 KOs) since last November when he lost by split decision in a 154-pound title bout to fellow unbeaten Demetrius Andrade. The loss sent Martirosyan, 27, into depression and ended his long relationship with Top Rank.

Martirosyan, based in Glendale, Calif., decided to make a change and signed with promoter Dan Goossen, along with his promoter and trainer Joe Goossen. Martirosyan has been outspoken in how pleased he is with the move after his frustration during his Top Rank tenure with then-trainer Freddie Roach, who sometimes left him to care for other pupils, thus undermining their training camps. Martirosyan said he now feels at home and with a team 100 percent dedicated to his preparation.

However, he'll need to show off the benefits of this change when he faces Lozano (28-4, 22 KOs), 26, a power puncher from Chihuahua, Mexico, who has won nine of his past 10 bouts.

Lozano, who is one fight removed from a debated decision defeat to hometown fighter Charles Hatley in Dallas, was named the opponent for Martirosyan after the first option, Argentine Luciano Cuello, abandoned the fight due to economic differences.

For Martirosyan, a native of Armenia, the fight is expected to be a real test due to his opponent's aggressive style. Lozano sets the pace with a jab that he often surprises with by transforming it into a hook.

While Lozano employs an orthodox guard, he effectively uses both hands for his power shots, especially on hooks from the outside. Martirosyan's advantages appear to be his speed and wingspan. Look for him to attack early from distance with his jab before releasing hooks and overhand shots from multiple angles.

In the co-main event, a 10-round lightweight bout, Anthony Peterson (32-1, 21 KOs) faces Dominican Marcos Jimenez (20-4, 13 KOs). Peterson, brother of junior welterweight titlist Lamont Peterson, suffered his only loss in 2010 against former titlist Brandon Rios.

Glazkov holds off Adamek's last stand

March, 16, 2014
Mar 16
12:11
AM ET
Vyacheslav "Czar" Glazkov rose to the occasion throughout most of the night in the biggest fight of his career.

But it took the unbeaten heavyweight prospect holding off a late rally from determined veteran Tomasz Adamek to secure Saturday's title eliminator.

[+] EnlargeGlazkov
Rich Graessle/Main EventsUnbeaten heavyweight Vyacheslav Glazkov used a heavy jab to outwork veteran Tomasz Adamek.
Glazkov (17-0-1, 11 KOs) fought past 10 rounds for the first time in his career and scored a unanimous decision (117-110, 117-111, 116-112) at the Sands Casino Resort in Bethlehem, Pa. ESPN.com scored the bout 115-113 for Glazkov.

"I wasn't surprised because I felt I was controlling all of the fight and winning every single round," Glazkov said, through an interpreter. "I didn't have experience to go into 12 rounds, which was missing in my game plan, but I learned during this bout."

Glazkov, 29, dominated for the majority of the bout with a punishing jab that caused severe swelling around the right eye of Adamek (49-3, 29 KOs) in Round 2. The 2008 Olympic bronze medalist from Ukraine continued to walk down and impose his size on Adamek, landing consistently with counter right hands.

"This is boxing, you know, sometimes it happens," said Adamek, of a badly swollen and bloody right eye that affected him throughout. "I have broken my nose in my career. This is boxing -- you never know what is going to happen."

Adamek, 37, was staggered by a hard right hand in Round 8 before getting hammered with power shots throughout most of Round 9. But the native of Poland never quit and posted a heroic final stand. Adamek produced his finest work in Round 12, connecting with a series of right hands on a fading Glazkov, whose left eye was swollen and bruised.

In the final two rounds, according to CompuBox, Adamek outlanded Glazkov 55-38 in total punches and 32-22 in power shots.

The loss snapped Adamek's five-fight winning streak since his 2011 title loss to Vitali Klitschko and dealt a major blow to any future hopes of contending for a belt. Because of that, Adamek openly considered retirement after the bout when asked if he plans on continuing.

"No, I have to stop," Adamek said. "I lose my chance and title shot is impossible. I don't know right now."

The victory proved to be a breakthrough one for Glazkov, who showed strong poise and confidence against a fighter with much more experience.

"This is a passing of the torch," said Main Events CEO Kathy Duva, who promotes both fighters. "Glazkov did everything he absolutely had to do to win this fight against a very tough and very accomplished opponent. Tonight he announced his arrival to everyone that he belongs among the top five heavyweights. Adamek is someone who has been a top 10 heavyweight for the last six to 10 years. I am really at a loss to say who amazed me more."

Chilemba handles Grachev

Light heavyweight contender Isaac Chilemba was simply too slick for the hard-charging Denis Grachev in the co-main event and cruised to a wide unanimous decision.

[+] EnlargeChilemba
Rich Graessle/Main EventsLight heavyweight Isaac Chilemba relied on movement and accuracy to outpoint a determined Denis Grachev.
Chilemba (22-2-2, 9 KOs), 26, did the majority of his damage by working off of his quick jab and countering on the inside with his right hand. The native of Malawi, who fights out of South Africa, was victorious by scores of 100-90 and 99-91, twice. ESPN.com also had it 100-90 for Chilemba.

Grachev (13-3-1, 8 KOs) persevered through cuts above and below his left eye, along with bleeding from his nose, to make it an exciting fight over the second half of the scheduled 10 rounds. The 31-year-old native of Russia, who fights out of San Diego, was simply unable to land a sustained amount of power shots.

The light-hitting Chilemba, who suffered a small cut above his right eye in Round 6, fought in a much more exciting style than he has become known for and did well to trade with Grachev on the inside at key moments.

Adamek looks to get back into title picture

March, 12, 2014
Mar 12
6:43
PM ET
As Tomasz Adamek enters Saturday’s title eliminator against unbeaten Vyacheslav “Czar” Glazkov, it’s fair to speculate whether the rugged veteran is coming or going as a heavyweight contender.

It’s no secret Adamek (49-2, 29 KOs) is navigating the twilight of an exciting 15-year career as he enters Saturday’s crossroads fight (NBC Sports Network, 9 p.m. ET) at the Sands Casino in Bethlehem, Penn.

But the key question staring him in the face after multiple -- and often memorable -- ring wars is simple: At 37, how much does Adamek have left?

On one hand, the former light heavyweight and cruiserweight titlist is 5-0 since being stopped in a 2011 heavyweight title loss to Vitali Klitschko and maintains a glossy résumé featuring just two defeats (he lost his 175-pound title to unbeaten Chad Dawson in 2007).

But digging a little deeper on his recent run exposes a different theory regarding Adamek’s current state. He not only received the benefit of the doubt on the scorecards in contentious 2012 decision wins over Eddie Chambers and Steve Cunningham, he went life-and-death for five rounds before stopping journeyman Travis Walker.

Regardless of which version of Adamek enters the ring against Glazkov (16-0-1, 11 KOs), a victory places the native of Poland, who fights out of Jersey City, N.J., firmly back into the title picture. But despite the must-win scenario he faces on Saturday, Adamek isn’t concerned about what a loss means to his future.

“I never think about losing, because I’m a warrior,” Adamek said. “If you start thinking about it, you better not go to the ring. Every fight is very important. If you want to be a challenger for title fights, you have to win every fight.”

[+] EnlargeTomasz Adamek
George Jimenez/MSportsimages.com A victory for Tomasz Adamek, right, over unbeaten Vyacheslav "Czar" Glazkov will put him back into the title picture.
The fight was originally scheduled for last November but was called off days before, when Adamek came down with the flu. What that meant for the typically active Adamek, who fought four times in a nine-month span in 2012, was a long layoff. He will enter Saturday’s fight having fought just once -- an August 2013 decision win over Dominick Guinn -- in the past 16 months.

Adamek’s trainer, Roger Bloodworth, looks at Adamek’s time away as a blessing instead of a curse.

“I’m not concerned,” Bloodworth said. “He’s a fighter with a lot of experience, and if you notice, most of your world champions don’t fight every month. I think as a fighter gets more years on him and gets more experience on him, he needs rest. Rest is as important as work.”

An added wrinkle to the storyline for Saturday’s fight is that Glazkov, 29, not only once served as a sparring partner for Adamek, he reportedly hurt the veteran fighter and gave him all he could handle.

“My feelings is sparring is sparring. A fight is a different story,” Adamek said. “You have small gloves and no hat and many people are watching you. It’s a different game. I’m looking for not what once was in sparring, I’m looking for the future and how I can show my class and my experience and win this fight.”

For a fighter like Adamek, whose best defense has always been his offense, predicting Saturday’s heavyweight tilt will be an all-action affair isn’t much of a stretch. In fact, Adamek was upfront regarding his thoughts on the topic when he said: “I’m ready for war.”

But that’s where the debate regarding Adamek’s true stock comes back into play. As an undersized heavyweight, will his experience and unrivaled toughness be enough to overcome yet another hungry young fighter in a likely action bout?

For Bloodworth, his focus is centered more on Adamek’s evolution away from that of a full-time brawler to more of a well-rounded fighter, who he said is just as good at 37 as he ever was.

“He’s just as dedicated. He wants to learn. He keeps improving,” Bloodworth said. “If you remember when he was fighting at light heavyweight and cruiserweight, he mainly just stood in front of you and threw punches. It was last man standing. I think he showed in his last bout [against Guinn] that he is becoming a boxer and a bit of a puncher. We’ve been practicing that, and we will see what happens [on Saturday].”

Angulo: 'We have worked on everything'

March, 5, 2014
Mar 5
3:03
PM ET

OAKLAND, Calif. -- Alfredo "El Perro" Angulo opened camp in Northern California with the same cordiality as always when talking about the preparation for his next fight.

The Mexican will lock horns with countryman Canelo Alvarez on Saturday at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas in a fight that will match two opponents who are coming off defeats.

Angulo looked relaxed and in a good mood as he remarked that he liked his camp, meticulously run by Virgil Hunter.

"All has gone perfectly," Hunter said. "We are already waiting for the preparation phase to get behind us so that we can then go to Vegas and fight."

Angulo avoided stressing any specific area of focus, but said he is ready for everything.

"We have truly worked on everything, including the slightest detail that could concern us," he said. "I think that we have done a phenomenal all-around preparation."

For Angulo, this will not be just another box office fight in his career. It will be the chance to avenge his last loss to Erislandy Lara, when he was unable to continue due to an injury.

"I think everyone saw what happened," he said. "My eye was completely swollen. Nothing could be done, and they stopped the fight. We'll keep working."

The fight against Lara was high profile, with the Cuban boxer hitting the canvas and Angulo kissing the mat one time on his own before having to withdraw in Round 10 due to a fracture of his left orbital bone.

Nevertheless, the Mexicali native said the fight was a learning experience.

[+] EnlargeAlfredo Angulo and Erislandy Lara
Tom Hogan/Hoganphotos/Golden Boy PromotionsAgainst Canelo Alvarez on Saturday, Alfredo Angulo (left) will attempt to leave his defeat to Erislandy Lara in the past.
"I think that you learn something from every fight, especially in the fights in which I did what was necessary to win and make the audience happy and emotional," he said.

His next opponent will basically be the opposite, given that Alvarez is a much more offensive boxer.

"These are two totally different boxers," he said. "One is an elusive fighter, a boxer, and the other has good, fast hands."

Despite this, Angulo acknowledges that, at the moment, Lara is the better fighter.

"I think Lara is a fighter with a lot of experience on both the amateur and professional levels," Angulo said. "I think that the fight with Lara will serve us well for this fight."

Angulo said he doesn't pay attention to the betting line that pegs his opponent as the favorite.

"Anyone can name anyone a favorite, but the only ones who will climb into the ring, the only ones stepping on the canvas, will be Canelo Alvarez and me," he said.

Regarding the progression of the fight and reading between the lines, it's clear that Angulo wants to have a battle.

"I would like to imagine a certain type of fight, but sincerely, I don't know," he said. "The fight is being called toe-to-toe, and if Canelo wants to honor this, then I'd be happy to oblige. But if not, we are ready. Don't worry."

Despite this, the former Mexican Olympian said that nothing would surprise him.

"The way 'El Perro' will fight, he will be the winner on fight night," Angulo said. "We have done excellent preparation for winning the 12 rounds, and that is all."

Regarding his opponent, Angulo agrees with the majority of experts and fans about Alvarez's performance against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

"I think that [Alvarez] fought a match that disillusioned a lot of people," Angulo said. "I think that many people expected more from Canelo Alvarez that night but unfortunately it wasn't to be."

Despite Mayweather's dominant performance, Angulo lamented not being able to use aspects of the American's strategy due to the stark difference in styles.

"I really doubt it because Floyd Mayweather and I have two totally different styles," he said. "If I were a boxer like Mayweather it would work for me, but we are totally different. He likes more punching. I've seen him fight live, and I can remember it perfectly."

Angulo (22-3) also hoped Alvarez wouldn't suffer from a loss of confidence in the aftermath of suffering his first loss, wanting instead to face the best that Alvarez has to offer.

"Each mind is its own world," Angulo said. "I hope he is 100 percent recovered so we can put on a good show for the people."

Boxcino middleweight tourney kicks off

February, 27, 2014
Feb 27
12:24
PM ET
After a successful debut last Friday to the 2014 Boxcino lightweight tournament, the middleweight bracket gets its turn this time around.

The four six-round, single-elimination quarterfinal bouts scheduled will feature eight fighters competing for the right to advance to the April 18 semifinals.

Friday's middleweight pairings certainly look appealing, with names such as Donatas Bondorovas, Vitaliy Kopylenko, the powerful Sena Agbeko and Brandon Adams headlining the ESPN "Friday Night Fights" card (ESPN2, 9 p.m. ET) from the Horseshoe Casino in Hammond, Ind.

Donatas Bondorovas (18-4-1, 6 KOs) versus Willie Monroe Jr. (15-1-0, 6 KOs)

A native of Lithuania now based in Chicago, Bondorovas is an aggressive fighter who sets the distance with his jab and feels plenty comfortable exchanging punches at close range. Bondorovas has won six of his past seven bouts, with the lone loss coming against Bryan Vera on FNF. Monroe, meanwhile, is a promising prospect born into a family of fighters of the same name. Not only was his father, Willie Monroe Sr., an outstanding middleweight from 1985 to 2000, his great uncle, Willie "The Worm" Monroe, is remembered for his three battles against the legendary Marvin Hagler, whom he defeated in their first bout in 1976 before dropping the other two by knockout. Monroe, who has won his last five fights, aims to go further than his predecessors and hopes the Boxcino 2014 becomes his ticket to a title shot.

Vitaliy Kopylenko (22-0, 12 KOs) versus Cerresso Fort (17-2-1, 11 KOs)

Kopylenko, 30, of the Ukraine, will be making his debut on American soil after a fantastic 2013 that featured three victories by knockout. He is a consistent fighter with good technique who likes to work from a distance, relying on his wingspan and movement. Fort is hoping to rebound from a stoppage defeat against Caleb Truax in September. The native of St. Paul, Minn., is an opponent who sets the pace with his aggressiveness, but he lacks consistency on the offensive side, often leaving him exposed to the counter attack.

Sena Agbeko (15-0, 15 KOs) versus Ray Gatica (13-2, 8 KOs)

Expect fireworks in this pairing between two warriors with plenty of power. Agbeko, of Ghana, will attempt to extend his impressive knockout streak while making his first appearance in the U.S. Gatica, of Austin, Texas, looks to recover from a controversial defeat to Fernando Guerrero in November. Gatica is a fighter constantly on the move, looking to control the pace with quick combinations.

Brandon Adams (12-0, 8 KOs) versus Daniel Edouard (23-4-2, 14 KOs)

Adams, 24, of Los Angeles, has opened his career with 12 straight wins, albeit against relatively soft competition. He will match himself against the veteran Edouard, of Haiti, who returns to the ring following a three-year absence. At 33, Edouard has plenty of experience against the likes of Peter Manfredo, Alfonso Mosquera and Jermain Taylor.

Vazquez retains title; Zou scores TKO

February, 22, 2014
Feb 22
8:26
PM ET
Miguel Vazquez, Denis Shafikov Chris Farina/Top RankMiguel Vazquez, left, defended his lightweight belt against Denis Shafikov in Macau.
You can say what you will about Miguel Vazquez’s fighting style, but make sure you remember to include how difficult it is to beat.

Vazquez, the long-armed, 5-foot-10 lightweight titlist from Mexico, employed a typical amount of frustrating tools within his arsenal in Saturday’s title defense against Denis Shafikov.

But in between the running and holding that has long frustrated the majority of fight fans, Vazquez (34-3, 13 KOs) did what he normally does -- land more punches than his opponent thanks to his awkward style while taking away their biggest offensive weapon by controlling the pace.

Vazquez made the sixth defense of his 135-pound title by scoring a unanimous decision (115-113, 116-112, 119-109) over Shafikov (33-1-1, 18 KOs), a southpaw from Russia, at the Venetian Resort’s Cotai Arena in Macau, China.

The victory brought an end to a 14-month layoff for Vazquez, 27, who took all of 2013 off after pulling out of a scheduled title unification bout with Ricky Burns of Scotland. It also, like most of his victories, wasn’t the most pleasing to the eyes -- to both the viewers at home and the fighters, who were each cut thanks to a series of accidental head-butts.

But it’s hard to argue with the success of Vazquez, who has remained on top since winning an interim title from Ji-Hoon Kim in August 2010 and has endured all three losses against top competition. Vazquez, who has never been stopped, lost to Timothy Bradley Jr. in 2007 and twice to Canelo Alvarez, including once at welterweight in 2008 and once in Vazquez’s pro debut by split decision.

Vazquez controlled the early rounds Saturday by landing punches while circling away from Shafikov, turning the bout into a sparring session. But action picked up in Round 4, when a head-butt opened up a gash above Vazquez’s left eye, giving room for Shafikov to land heavy shots on the inside.

His success, however, was short-lived thanks to a key adjustment from Vazquez, who used his long reach to land a series of uppercuts from distance each time Shafikov got low and prepared to rush forward. From there, the bout devolved into a clinchfest initiated by Vazquez, who consistently beat Shafikov to the punch by darting inside, landing combinations and tying him up.

Blood began to flow from the right eye of Shafikov in Round 7, leading to some of Vazquez’s best moments offensively with a series of uppercuts and sidearm punches on the inside.

Vazquez might not be as exciting or as naturally talented as some of the biggest names at or around 135 pounds, but it’s hard to argue against him being in possession of the division’s best résumé. While getting past him will be no easy task for any of his fellow titlists, Vazquez remains a necessary hurdle to clear for any lightweight hoping to declare himself the best in the world.

Zou Shiming scores first knockout of career

Two-time Olympic gold medalist Zou Shiming of China remained unbeaten and scored the first stoppage victory of his career on Saturday.

[+] EnlargeShiming, Kokietgym
Chris Farina/Top RankZou Shiming scored another impressive win, stopping Yokthong Kokietgym in seven rounds.
Zou (4-0, 1 KO), 32, scored three knockdowns en route to a 7th-round, TKO win over Thailand’s Yokthong Kokietgym while headlining another main event in Macau.

While it’s no question Zou’s fame has progressed faster than his in-ring ability, the victory over Kokietgym (15-4, 11 KOs) was another positive step forward. Zou was as flashy and offensive-minded as ever, but he also sat down well on his punches and eventually hurt his determined, yet overmatched, opponent.

Zou caught Kokietgym with a short right hand that floored him in Round 7 before going on to score two more clean, and particularly destructive, knockdowns on hard and flush shots before the fight was stopped.

The questions regarding Zou’s chin and punching power likely won’t go away any time soon, meaning it might be tough to hail him as a future title threat until you see him in that spot with your own eyes. But he’s certainly an attraction, competing in a division with a number of equally exciting and fan-friendly names.

FNF kicks off Boxcino lightweight tourney

February, 20, 2014
Feb 20
10:30
AM ET

It's tourney time on ESPN's "Friday Night Fights" as the quarterfinals of the 2014 Boxcino lightweight tournament kick off this week at the Edgewater Hotel & Casino in Laughlin, Nev.

The Boxcino tournament, which kicks off its middleweight edition on Feb. 28, gets underway Friday (ESPN2, 9 p.m. ET) with four six-round single elimination bouts in the lightweight division. The network had previously broadcast a Boxcino tournament in 1997, won by future four-time world titlist Acelino "Popo" Freitas.

The career path of each of the fighters competing in the lightweight bracket have created a huge anticipation about the quality of bouts we are expected to see.

Yakubu Amidu (21-4-2, 19 KOs) vs. Chris Rudd (12-1, 8 KOs)

Amidu, 29, of Ghana, has held regional titles in Africa and is fresh off a win against Rynell Griffin in November. He has good technique and has already faced top level opponents such as Ali Funeka, Ricky Burns and Juan Carlos Burgos. Rudd, meanwhile, is a fearsome puncher who is coming off the first defeat of his career in November against William Jackson. The clash of styles -- technique versus aggression -- should produce a close and attractive battle.

Petr Petrov (32-4-2, 15 KOs) vs. Fedor Papazov (14-0, 9 KOs)

This bout between Russian fighters promises an entertaining pairing of experience against conviction. Petrov, 30, who was born in Ryazan and now resides in Spain, is a 14-year pro most known for his 2011 knockout loss to Marcos Maidana in an interim junior welterweight title bout in Argentina. Papazov, 28, who is known as "Knockout Man," has yet to face first-class opposition the way Petrov has. In his last bout, held in Krasnodar, Russia, Papazov won a 10-round decision against Sergio Javier Escobar.

Miguel Gonzalez (22-3, 16 KOs) vs. Miguel Angel Mendoza (21-2-2, 21 KOs)

Expect a firefight between aggressive Mexican fighters in this one. Gonzalez, 28, who fights out of Cleveland, ended the 12-fight win streak of Brazilian Josenilson Dos Santos by knockout last July. Mendoza, 30, has not only stopped all 21 opponents he has defeated, he has faced higher opposition than Gonzalez, including a 2011 defeat against Rey Bautista.

Fernando Carcamo (15-5, 12 KOs) vs. Samuel Neequaye (21-0, 15 KOs)

Neequaye, of Ghan, puts his unbeaten record on the line against the Mexican southpaw Carcamo. In his last bout, Neequaye, 30, won a decision over Dorin Spivey last August. But he faces a tough test in Carcamo, 23, who is aggressive and has plenty of power behind his punches. Carcamo has stopped his last five opponents, the last two inside of two rounds, including a victory last September against former world title contender Vicente Escobedo.

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