Chicago Bears: Michael Ford

Slimmed-down Lynch ready to compete

July, 24, 2014
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BOURBONNAIS, Ill. -- Making the move from quarterback to running back at the NFL level is daunting.

But that is the challenge awaiting former Northern Illinois standout and Heisman Trophy finalist Jordan Lynch, a fan favorite who lost 15 pounds since the Chicago Bears' rookie minicamp in May to weigh in at 205 pounds when players reported to Bourbonnais on Wednesday.

“I know Chicago has my back. But I have to go out there and do the work,” Lynch said on Thursday.

“I’m going out there and giving it everything I got. That’s how I made it this far. I’m going out there to prove that I can play running back in this league, and I can play some special teams. So I’m going to do whatever the coaches ask me to do and I’m going to bust my tail. At the end, I’m going to try and make a roster spot.”

With a minimum of three roster spots often reserved for running backs, Lynch finds himself in direct competition with Ka'Deem Carey, Michael Ford, Senorise Perry and Shaun Draughn to earn one of the reserve backfield spots behind Pro Bowl tailback Matt Forte.

A well-rounded quarterback/athlete in college, Lynch, an undrafted rookie free agent, gained 4,344 rushing yards for the Huskies and passed for 51 touchdowns while posting a 24-4 record as a starter in two seasons.

Lynch believes that kind of versatility can only aid his cause when cuts begin to trickle down later next month.

“The more you can do, the better in this league,” Lynch said. “I think my versatility is one of the things that stand out. When it comes down to the last cuts, the more you can do, the better you are.

“Heading into my first professional camp, I feel kind of anxious. But I’m going to go all out and give everything I have.”
Overview: Matt Forte racked up a career-high 1,933 yards from scrimmage last season, which ranked as the fifth most in franchise history, and he did it in a new offense. In Year 2 in Marc Trestman’s offense, Forte figures to put up similar numbers as the staff refines the scheme to focus on the club’s strengths.

Forte
Forte
“Last year, we had to figure out what we were gonna be good at,” Forte said, “and I think that’s just being balanced between the run and the pass. We kind of started out heavy pass early last season, and kind of sprinkling in runs. Then we found out what kinds of runs the O-line likes to block and were good at with the tight ends. Then we started doing different types [of runs]. [Offensive coordinator Aaron] Kromer is good at mixing them up between runs. Being balanced this year and already knowing with the offensive line likes to block is gonna give us a little head start.”

Battle to watch: Forte’s got the top spot locked up, obviously. So the most intriguing competition at this position at training camp will involve rising second-year man Michael Ford and rookie fourth-round pick Ka’Deem Carey. Team officials and coaches typically mention that money doesn’t play into personnel decisions, but that’s not always the case. The Bears paid Carey $443,380 in a signing bonus, while Ford, last season received $3,500. So it’s likely Carey will be given more opportunities than Ford to win the backup job behind Forte. But Carey’s got to win the position as the team simply won’t just hand it to him.

“I don’t feel any pressure. I like to have fun, and when I have fun, I play my best,” Carey said. “If I get worked up about trying to compete and trying to show what I’ve got, then I will just show out bad. I want to perform how I know how to perform. I walk around with a smile, and I have fun, and I perform.”

Ford, listed at 5-foot-10, 216 pounds is bigger than Carey. But the latter is considered more a grinder between the tackles as Ford seems to be more of a scat back type with impressive quickness. Carey was a contributor on special teams last season, which should help his cause.

Dark horse: Undrafted rookie Jordan Lynch probably won’t receive a real opportunity to see any playing time next season, and it’s going to be difficult for him to make the team. But the coaching staff likes Lynch, a former quarterback at Northern Illinois, and he could impress in the preseason if given the opportunity. Trestman has mentioned on multiple occasions that the former quarterback doesn’t look out of place playing running back, and he doesn’t. At NIU, Lynch rushed for 1,815 and 1,920 yards in back-to-back seasons. So there’s no question he can tote the pill. Lynch’s background as a quarterback likely means he’ll absorb Chicago’s playbook quickly enough to really open eyes in the preseason, provided he’s given a legit shot to play.

“I spent a lot of time in the film room in past years [as a quarterback], and I feel that work ethic is going to carry over to running back, and always watching film and trying to pick up on little things,” Lynch said. “I’m a football player. I love football, and I’ll do whatever it takes to stay in the NFL.”

Who makes the cut: The Bears finished the season with three running backs (Michael Bush, Ford and Forte) and a fullback in Tony Fiammetta. It’s likely the Bears head into 2014 with Forte, Carey and Ford along with Fiammetta. The best-case scenario for Lynch appears to be a spot on the practice squad.

Bears draft focus: RB

May, 1, 2014
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The signing of veteran tailback Shaun Draughn last week eased some concerns about the Bears' lack of depth in their offensive backfield, but the team could decide to add another running back in the later rounds of next month's draft to compliment the current trio of Matt Forte, Michael Ford and Draughn.

One potential candidate is Wisconsin running back James White, the Badgers' fourth all-time leading rusher with 4,015 yards. White's 45 career rushing touchdowns ranks third in school history.

ESPNChicago.com reported in mid-April that the Bears had traveled to Madison, Wis. and conducted a private workout with White, who led all rushers with 11 carries for 62 yards and one touchdown at the 2014 at the 2014 Senior Bowl.

Oregon's De'Anthony Thomas reportedly made a pre-draft visit to Halas Hall.

Both White and Thomas are listed at 5-foot-9.

While Forte handled almost all of the snaps at running back last year in Marc Trestman's offense, the Bears do need to have a plan in place in case Forte is forced to miss time or a game due to injury. The club released veteran Michael Bush prior to the start of free agency.

Ford is a promising second-year player out of LSU, but he did not carry the ball in 2013. However, he is expected to compete for the No. 2 job in the preseason.

Since the general consensus in the NFL is that running backs can be found almost anywhere, the Bears should have a large group of players to choose from if they want to invest one of their final picks in the position.

Five potential targets:
1. James White, Wisconsin

2. De'Anthony Thomas, Oregon

3. Isaiah Crowell, Alabama State

4. Marion Grice, Arizona State

5. James Wilder Jr., Florida State

The next five: 6. Jerick McKinnon, Georgia Southern; 7. Rajion Neal, Tennessee; 8. Tyler Gaffney, Louisville; 9. Senorise Perry; 10. Storm Johnson, UCF.

Position grade: C

Bears sign RB Shaun Draughn

April, 23, 2014
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The Chicago Bears signed running back Shaun Draughn to a one-year contract, the team announced.

Draughn
Draughn played in 20 games for the Kansas City Chiefs and Baltimore Ravens from 2011-13. His best season came in 2012 when he carried the ball 59 times for 233 yards and two touchdowns and caught 24 passes for 158 yards for the Chiefs.

Draughn also returned 23 kickoffs for 537 yards that same year in Kansas City.

Bears general manager Phil Emery served as the Chiefs' director of college scouting when Draughn entered the league in 2011 as an undrafted rookie free agent out of North Carolina. Draughn originally signed with the Washington Redskins before eventually making his way to Kansas City.

The 6-foot, 205 pound tailback appeared in just three games and ran the ball only four times for two yards for the Ravens last season.

The Bears were looking to add depth in the backfield in the offseason after the club released veteran running back Michael Bush on the eve of NFL free agency in March. The team could still decide to draft a running back in the late rounds to compete with the likes of Draughn and Michael Ford for the reserve roster spots behind two-time Pro Bowl starter Matt Forte.

Bears keep tabs on RB James White

April, 14, 2014
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The release of veteran running back Michael Bush on March 10 left a hole in the Chicago Bears' backfield the team must eventually fill.

While the Bears do currently have second-year tailback/return man Michael Ford slotted behind two-time Pro Bowler Matt Forte on the depth chart, the team could use more depth and competition at the position.

That help could arrive next month if the Bears select a running back somewhere between the fourth and sixth rounds of the upcoming NFL draft, a reasonable target area given the priority in the early rounds will likely be safety, cornerback, defensive tackle and inside linebacker, in no particular order.

One backfield prospect to keep tabs on is former Wisconsin running back James White, who led all rushers with 11 carries for 62 yards and one touchdown at the 2014 Senior Bowl.

The Bears recently traveled to Wisconsin's campus in Madison to put White through a private pre-draft workout, according to a source with direct knowledge of the situation.

Although listed at 5-foot-9, 204 pounds, White finished his four-year career at Wisconsin as the Badgers' No. 4 all-time leading rusher with 4,015 yards and ranks No. 3 in school history with 45 rushing touchdowns.

White ran for 1,444 yards and 13 touchdowns and caught 39 passes for 300 yards and two scores for Wisconsin last season. He also returned kickoffs his first two years in Madison.

Keep in mind, the Bears require a versatile running back that is capable of not only picking up yards on the ground if called upon, but also a player that can catch the ball out of the backfield. Utilizing the tailback in the passing game is a key component of Marc Trestman's offense, and one of Forte's greatest strengths since entering the league in 2008.

In addition to White, there should be an ample supply of running backs for the Bears to choose from in the later rounds if the organization decides to fill that need via the draft.

Other names to consider are Alabama State's Isaiah Crowell, Oregon's De'Anthony Thomas (the Bears reportedly hosted Thomas on a top-30 pre-draft visit at Halas Hall), Tennessee's Rajion Neal, Stanford's Tyler Gaffney, Louisville's Senorise Perry, Arizona State's Marion Grice and Florida State's James Wilder, Jr., among others.

Grice suffered a lower leg injury last year and had to wait until last week to work out in front of scouts at his personal Pro Bowl. Representatives from 17 NFL teams were in attendance. The Bears were not present, but the 6-foot, 207 pound Grice did catch 91 passes out of the backfield for the Sun Devils over the last two seasons.

The Bears also worked out a handful of veteran free agent running backs last week at Halas Hall.

Can Bears maximize Michael Bush?

February, 21, 2014
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INDIANAPOLIS -- It’s hard to blame the Chicago Bears for signing veteran tailback Michael Bush to a four-year, $14 million contract in 2012 that included $7 million in total guarantees.

With starting running back Matt Forte locked in a contract dispute with the club after receiving the franchise tag following the 2011 regular season, the Bears needed to protect themselves in case Forte and the team were unable to reach a long-term agreement. Forte had also missed the final four games that year with a knee injury.

[+] EnlargeMichael Bush
Ron Schwane/USA TODAY SportsMichael Bush had a career-low 63 carries in 2013.
In the end, Forte and the Bears reached an accord on a four-year deal and Bush spent the last two seasons as a part-time player in the Bears’ offense.

Last year, despite eating up $3.550 million worth of salary-cap space, Bush carried the ball a career-low 63 times for 197 yards (3.1 yards per rush) and caught the ball just four times for 48 yards.

Can the Bears get more bang for their buck out of Bush, who is scheduled to count $3.850 million against the cap in 2014?

“I think, No. 1, it was very difficult to take Matt off the field, and it was very impressive that he had the endurance to do what he did this year,” Bears head coach Marc Trestman said at the NFL combine. “There were times that we just felt we had a plan to play Michael more, the defense may have been on the field, and Matt had a good enough rest so we kept Matt out there and didn’t get Michael on as much as we would’ve liked to. We had a plan but we didn’t execute it. A lot of that, going in, was Matt’s productivity.

I’ve experienced this in Oakland when we had Tyrone Wheatley and Charlie Garner. There’s a place, certainly, for that type of back. If you have a system of football that’s flexible enough, you can seamlessly make that transition and still be just as effective.”

If the Bears decide to cut ties with Bush, the organization would still be on the hook for $2 million worth of dead salary cap space -- the remaining balance of Bush’s prorated $4 million signing bonus. But it’s unclear whether the Bears believe second-year running back Michael Ford is ready to assume the role as the team’s No. 2 tailback. The 5-foot-10 Ford played on special teams last year where he appeared in 12 games and returned five kickoffs for 37 yards and made five special-teams tackles. Ford’s 2014 salary cap number is projected to be $496,166.
2014 free agents: None.

Forte
Forte
The good: Matt Forte earned his second Pro Bowl berth after finishing the season ranked No. 2 in the NFL with 1,339 rushing yards, third in yards from scrimmage (1,933), third in first downs (97), fourth in receiving yardage by running backs (594) and tied for No. 6 in rushing touchdowns (nine). The rushing yardage and yards from scrimmage were career bests for Forte. In all, Forte ranked in the top 10 in eight statistical categories, while also serving as a crucial component of the protection schemes. Forte’s primary backup, Michael Bush, finished second on the team in rushing with 197 yards.

Bush
Bush
The bad: As well as Forte played in 2013, he can’t do it all by himself. So the Bears need to explore the possibility of bringing in a complementary back. Bush averaged just 3.1 yards per attempt, and ran seven times for minus-five yards in a Nov. 24 loss at St. Louis. Given that Bush outweighs Forte by 27 pounds, it would seem logical he’d be a more viable short-yardage option. But that didn’t seem to be the case in 2013. The team’s 1,828 rushing yards ranked as the team’s lowest total in three years, and the 404 attempts were the club’s fewest since 2009. The Bears also finished last in the league in third-and-1 rushing situations, converting just 33.3 percent.

The money (2014 salary-cap numbers): Forte ($7.5 million), Bush ($3.85 million), Tony Fiammetta ($730,000), Michael Ford ($496,616). The cap numbers are manageable, but the Bears might look into upgrading in Bush’s spot given that his contributions aren’t commensurate to the $3.85 million cap figure. Perhaps the Bears will give Ford an opportunity to win the No. 2 job during training camp. Ford excelled during training camp and tied with Forte for the team lead in preseason rushing, but he’ll have to improve at pass protection for the team to feel comfortable enough to increase his role.

Draft priority: Low. The Bears would be fine going into the season with Bush as the primary backup to Forte. But it wouldn’t be a bad idea to see whether they can upgrade there because Forte, while healthy in 2013, has missed time in the past. Teams are increasingly going to a running back-by-committee approach, but in Chicago, Forte has shouldered the majority of the workload. That just doesn’t seem to be a sustainable plan moving forward.

BE: Cuts expected to come a day early

August, 30, 2013
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CHICAGO -- The scene in the locker room minutes after the Bears concluded the preseason finale against Cleveland included several handshakes, pats on the back and man hugs saying goodbye.

Apparently the Bears don’t plan to waste time in cutting the 22 players needed to get down to the mandatory 53-man roster limit before Saturday’s 3 p.m. CST deadline.

“We’ll be at it bright and early tomorrow,” Bears coach Marc Trestman said. “(General manager) Phil (Emery) and I will sit down early in the morning, (and make decisions) based on the information we gathered from the tape and from the other coaches. It will be a collective process to make those decisions that work out to be the final 53.”

Several players made strong cases during Thursday night’s 18-16 loss to the Cleveland Browns. Others only reinforced decisions the club had already planned on making. Trestman mentioned that he didn’t think “anyone played themselves out of the roster tonight,” but the truth is quite a few didn’t exactly play themselves onto it, either. Over the next several hours, there’s a good chance the team will start bringing players into Halas Hall to begin cuts.

Here’s a sampling of what some of the on-the-bubble players had to say in pleading their respective cases.

RB Armando Allen: “To me, the reality is you don’t have control over the decision being made. So for me, it’s just I’ve just got to stay positive and keep my mind focused and in the right mindset for whatever comes next. Did I feel like I did enough? I’m probably one of my biggest critics. I feel like there’s a lot of things that I could have done better. If I was pitching myself, for me, it’s just simple. I come to work hard every day; great individual. I know the plays, (and) I’m a great special teams player. So, that’s about all I can say. My work speaks for itself.”

RB Michael Ford: “You can’t get into the coaches' head. You’ve got to let the coaches coach and do what they do. The only thing we can go out there and do is play and play hard. I gave it my all. I went into practice and gave it my all, and went into the games and gave it my all. I really can’t worry about it. When you give it your all and did everything you could, you can’t worry about it, because you know you gave 100 percent at what you did.”

WR Joe Anderson: “I’ve always felt confident. I believe in myself regardless of who else does. When you believe in yourself, you win. I believe in me. If you ask me, I believe I made this team. But you never know what someone else is thinking. So I just come to work every day and do my job. I control what I can control, (and) that’s what I do on the field. So upstairs, that’s their job. I’m gonna let them do their job, and I’ll do my job.”

OL Eben Britton: “I feel good about it. I feel really good about it. Yeah, I feel like (I made this team). I’m not the type of guy to beat my chest too much, but I was really proud of myself just about how I approached the whole camp, and what I got out of it. I feel the best I’ve felt in years. It was a great training camp for me, and I feel really good about the future. Now, I feel like I do things without even thinking about it anymore. It’s just starting to become natural because that’s what (offensive coordinator Aaron) Kromer has taught us every day. Even since back in April, I just kept working on the techniques we were taught in the run game and the pass game, stayed focused, and I just feel really good about how far I’ve come since getting here.”
  • Considering the limited prep time given recently signed quarterbacks Jordan Palmer and Trent Edwards, the duo performed fairly well against Cleveland, especially Palmer. He completed 11 of 17 for 11 yards and a touchdown to finish with a passer rating of 102.8.“I’ve prepared for this game as much as I’ve ever prepared for a game,” Palmer said. “It was a lot of fun to go out there, and I feel like we moved the ball and did some good things.”Trestman has said his preference is to keep three quarterbacks on the 53-man roster. So if that holds true over the next two days, ESPNChicago.com colleague Jeff Dickerson says it would be hard to imagine the Bears cutting ties with Palmer.
  • Rookie cornerback Demontre Hurst didn’t hurt his cause, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Hurst probably didn’t help it much, either. Last year, former seventh-round pick Greg McCoy ran back an interception for a touchdown in the preseason finale at Cleveland, but still wound up among the final cuts. But to Hurst’s credit, his preseason was better than McCoy’s in 2012. In addition to the interception, Hurst posted five tackles in addition to forcing Brian Hoyer into an intentional grounding penalty.
  • Brad Biggs says the Bears are interested in quarterbacks who have practice squad eligibility remaining, and one of them is former Vanderbilt quarterback Jordan Rodgers, the younger brother of Green Bay signal caller Aaron Rodgers.
  • Inconsistency has been the story of training camp for tight end Fendi Onobun. The Bears have a difficult decision to make here, and it will likely take place Friday.Trestman explained that “when the light switch goes on” for Onobun, “he’s got a chance to be a very good player. We have some tough decisions to make, and certainly Fendi is going to be in the mix when we make these decisions because of what he showed tonight again, and what he’s shown in practice.”What I saw was merely another up-and-down performance.
  • Here's my take on J'Marcus Webb from Thursday night's game. Not good, not bad, just mediocre, which likely won't be good enough for him to make this team. Obviously, everyone wanted to speak with Webb after the game. But once officials opened the locker room, Webb was already gone, his locker cleaned out.

Webb mediocre, Onobun struggles

August, 29, 2013
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CHICAGO -- J'Marcus Webb's fortunes seemingly turned as quickly as the defensive ends in recent years rounding the corner past him for sacks.

Having started 32 consecutive games at left tackle, Webb entered training camp as the first-team right tackle. In a matter of days, though, Webb could be among the team’s cuts as it whittles down to 53 players.

After taking a demotion and a pay cut recently, Webb was among the bottom-of-the-roster types featured Thursday night in Chicago’s 18-16 loss to the Browns, struggling in a last gasp to make the team. With the starters sitting to prevent injury, Webb started at right tackle, and played every snap.

His performance seemed underwhelming. Officials called Webb for false start on third and 6 in the opening quarter. That moved the Bears from the Cleveland 33 to the 38, and after a failed third-down conversion, Robbie Gould kicked a 52-yard field goal.

Webb later gave up a pressure when he and right guard Derek Dennis were bull-rushed into Jordan Palmer.

The performance wasn’t all bad, but it likely didn’t convince the Bears to keep Webb.

Here’s a look at a couple other performances by on-the-bubble players battling for some of the final roster spots:

TE Fendi Onobun: After a training camp filled with drops and inconsistency, Onobun seemed poised for a rebound. Onobun caught the first pass thrown his way, but was later called for holding with eight minutes left in the second quarter. Onobun caught a 4-yarder the very next play. But in the second quarter, he dropped a slightly underthrown ball from Palmer. In the third quarter, a catchable Trent Edwards pass skipped off Onobun’s hands, resulting in an interception by James-Michael Johnson. Onobun did pull in a 20-yard reception in the third quarter. But the negatives outweighed the positives. It would be a surprise if Onobun makes the roster.

Allen vs. Ford: In this battle of the running backs, Michael Ford, an undrafted rookie out of LSU, seemed to emerge the victor. Ford ran for 48 yards on nine attempts, while Armando Allen, his main competition for the No. 3 running back job, gained 39 yards on 10 attempts. Allen was at a disadvantage coming into Thursday because he had missed time due to a hamstring injury.

S Brandon Hardin: Perhaps the long layoff was too much to overcome. Going into last season, Hardin hadn’t played in a football game since 2010. Then, last preseason, he suffered a neck injury on Aug. 26 that landed him on the injured reserve.

Hardin played the entire game Thursday, and didn’t make enough plays to turn heads. Hardin also gave up a 14-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter.

Bears roster battles to watch vs. Browns

August, 29, 2013
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Here are three positional battles to monitor heading into the Chicago Bears’ preseason finale versus the Cleveland Browns:

1. Running back: Undrafted rookie Michael Ford is making a strong push to grab one of the final spots on the 53-man roster after returning a kickoff 100 yards in the second preseason game against San Diego, then following up that performance with 58 rushing yards and a touchdown on nine carries last week in Oakland. If the Bears decide to keep just three tailbacks, it means either Ford or veteran Armando Allen has to go. Allen played well last season for the Bears, appearing in 15 games and recording seven special-teams tackles. But Allen has been working his way back from an injury the past couple weeks, which has opened the door for the less expensive rookie out of LSU to showcase himself in these preseason games. Both figure to receive ample playing time tonight at Soldier Field.

2. Quarterback: The Bears’ offense is entirely in the hands of veteran quarterbacks Jordan Palmer and Trent Edwards after Bears head coach Marc Trestman announced last week that starter Jay Cutler and No. 2 Josh McCown would not see the field in the final preseason contest. If the Bears open the season with three quarterbacks, and that is still an if, the final spot could be determined by which of the two reserves has a better game against the Browns, plus what each accomplished on the practice field the past two weeks. The Bears got a brief look at just Palmer last week in the fourth quarter (1-for-1, five yards), but both quarterbacks will get an extended look tonight. Even if the Bears decide to go with just two quarterbacks to start the year, the team might still find themselves in need of another QB later in the season -- that’s why this is still an important game for Palmer and Edwards, regardless.

3. Offensive line: If the Bears retain eight offensive linemen, as offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer hinted earlier in training camp, then two spots might still be available. That means Jonathan Scott, Eben Britton, J’Marcus Webb and Taylor Boggs are probably the guys still alive to make the team, although sometimes these calls are already made before the final preseason game. Scott has actually pulled off the rare feat of improving his position on the team despite missing the past several weeks with a knee injury that required a procedure to clean it out. That’s because Webb has continued to struggle ever since being demoted to second-team left tackle. Webb is a mystery. He has all the physical gifts, but his inconsistency coupled with his strange behavior and apparent lack of passion toward the game, makes him a strong candidate to get cut. If Scott’s knee is OK for Week 1, then it might make sense to just keep him and Britton, try and sneak Boggs on the practice squad, and send Webb on his merry way. But if Webb wants to make one final stand, he better make the most his opportunities tonight.

Early returns on Hester are positive

August, 20, 2013
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LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- The early returns on Devin Hester's transition to full-time special teamer have been encouraging.

[+] EnlargeDevin Hester
AP Photo/Bob LeveroneDevin Hester has two kick returns for 68 yards during the preseason.
Without the responsibility of having to take a single rep at wide receiver, Hester has looked fresh and re-energized when given the opportunity to return kickoffs during the preseason. The NFL record holder for combined kick-return touchdowns with 17, Hester almost broke the opening kickoff last week against the San Diego Chargers, but he was tripped up after a 45-yard return.

"He was pretty close," Bears special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis said. "The kicker made a nice play and then also the safety from the back side. It was just good to get him some action, some real action. It was good to see those guys blocking the way they did, too, because there was definitely some holes out there, which was nice to see."

Hester also was credited with a 23-yard kickoff return in the Bears' preseason opener in Carolina when he decided to run the ball out after fielding it in the back of the end zone. The Bears have given Hester the green light on kickoff returns in both exhibition games. That aggressive style doesn't just help Hester, it allows the rest of the return team members to practice setting up their blocks.

"Even when Devin was having those big years, Devin had some big holes to go through," DeCamillis said. "We just got to do a better job of getting some holes for him at the start, and then, you know, he's gotta go and play better also. So it's a combination of all of those. I've got to help him schematically with what we're doing. Guys gotta block better, and he's gotta return better. That's what we've been working on all camp, and hopefully it starts to show up."

DeCamillis also has taken notice of undrafted rookie Michael Ford, who is fighting to earn a roster spot at running back. With Armando Allen sidelined last week due to a hamstring injury, Ford helped his cause with a 100-yard kickoff return against the Chargers. He finished the game with three returns for 160 yards.

"It would be tough not to like what you saw in a Michael Ford," DeCamillis said. "He did a great job. On his long one, that wasn't one of the better blocked returns that we had all night. He made a guy miss right in the hole. So that was a great run by him, and he did a better job on coverage, too. So he's making it tough. He's doing a good job of what we need to see from him, that's for sure."

Bears agree to terms with UFAs

April, 28, 2013
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The NFL Draft came to a close on Saturday, but the Chicago Bears remained hard at work on the phones in the aftermath as they attemped to sign undrafted rookie free agents.

The Chicago Bears agreed to terms with 10 players for their 2013 class of undrafted free agents.

Here’s the list:

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