Print and Go Back ESPN.com: Chicago Bears [Print without images]

Wednesday, October 9, 2013
Despite losses, offense trending positively

By Michael C. Wright
ESPN.com

LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Chicago Bears offensive coordinator Aaron Kromer took exception Wednesday to the perception that the club has struggled in the running game and at adequately protecting quarterback Jay Cutler.

The Bears gave up three sacks in their first 12 plays from scrimmage Sunday in a loss to the New Orleans Saints, and the ground game churned out 94 yards with the offense in pass mode due to the club falling behind 20-7 at the break.

"Right now, if you look at statistically where we are -- and that's what a lot of people do; we're seventh in the league in rushing yards per carry, and we're sixth in the league in sacks given up," Kromer said. "So we have had one [bad] quarter and everyone panics that we can't play football in Chicago anymore. I say they're wrong."

Kromer's partially correct in his assessment.

The Bears rank 11th in the NFL in total offense (368.6 yards per game), are tied for sixth in rushing average (4.6 yards per carry) and are tied for fifth in sacks allowed as just one of seven teams in the league to surrender fewer than 10 through the first five games.

Chicago's offense is also No. 3 in the NFL in scoring (29 points per game).

Perhaps the offense's two most pronounced areas of deficiency are third-down conversion percentage (36) and average time of possession (29:10), two areas in which the team is 21st in the NFL. Last week's game skews Chicago's overall time of possession stat somewhat, given the offense possessed the ball for just 24 minutes while the Saints maintained possession for 36.

So despite the Bears losing two in a row, the club knows the season hasn't gotten away; that they're still trending upward offensively in terms of development.

"I think the key is you keep doing the things you know are right. You keep working on the things to make the corrections. You stay even-keeled," Bears coach Marc Trestman said. "You don't lose your mind. You try to have common sense about it. You know it's a long road. It's a long journey and anything can happen, and you try not to reach and do things that others think you maybe should be doing. You try to be real pragmatic about it. We continue to grade ourselves, critique ourselves and try to find ways that we can detail our work and get better."

At this point, that's all the team should be doing to ensure they've developed sufficiently enough that during the playoff push in November and December they're able to deliver.