Chicago Bears: Joe Anderson

Special teams call goes against Bears

October, 20, 2013
10/20/13
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LANDOVER, MD -- Chicago Bears assistant head coach/special teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis appearance in the FedEx Field visitor’s locker room on Sunday after the Bears’ 45-41 loss to the Washington Redskins said it all.

Although the Bears prohibit assistant coaches from speaking to the media following games, DeCamillis’ foul mood can likely be attributed to a controversial fourth-quarter call that went against the Bears as the club attempted a surprise onside kick.

After a Robbie Gould field goal cut the Redskins’ lead to 38-34 with 8:44 left in the game, Gould executed a perfect onside kick that was recovered by Zack Bowman at the Bears’ 46 yard line.

However, the officials ruled that Bears’ special teams ace Eric Weems was offsides on the play, which negated the Bears’ recovery and forced Gould to re-kick. With the element of surprise no longer on the Bears’ side, Gould did not attempt a second onside kick.

Television replays of the Weems penalty appeared to be inconclusive.

Bears head coach Marc Trestman explained why the team called for the onside kick at that specific juncture of the game.

“We needed a possession back,” Trestman said. “We had planned for it. It’s something we had planned for during the week. Special situation football decisions are not made at that moment. It was evident that their offense was on the field too much.”

DeCamillis later called for another high-risk special teams maneuver when he instructed Devin Hester to lateral the football across the field to Joe Anderson during the Bears’ final kickoff return of the game. Anderson gained 25 yards on the play to give the Bears’ the football at their 38 yard line with 33 seconds left on the clock. But the Bears eventually ran out of time when Josh McCown got sacked on the final play of the game.

BE: Cuts expected to come a day early

August, 30, 2013
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CHICAGO -- The scene in the locker room minutes after the Bears concluded the preseason finale against Cleveland included several handshakes, pats on the back and man hugs saying goodbye.

Apparently the Bears don’t plan to waste time in cutting the 22 players needed to get down to the mandatory 53-man roster limit before Saturday’s 3 p.m. CST deadline.

“We’ll be at it bright and early tomorrow,” Bears coach Marc Trestman said. “(General manager) Phil (Emery) and I will sit down early in the morning, (and make decisions) based on the information we gathered from the tape and from the other coaches. It will be a collective process to make those decisions that work out to be the final 53.”

Several players made strong cases during Thursday night’s 18-16 loss to the Cleveland Browns. Others only reinforced decisions the club had already planned on making. Trestman mentioned that he didn’t think “anyone played themselves out of the roster tonight,” but the truth is quite a few didn’t exactly play themselves onto it, either. Over the next several hours, there’s a good chance the team will start bringing players into Halas Hall to begin cuts.

Here’s a sampling of what some of the on-the-bubble players had to say in pleading their respective cases.

RB Armando Allen: “To me, the reality is you don’t have control over the decision being made. So for me, it’s just I’ve just got to stay positive and keep my mind focused and in the right mindset for whatever comes next. Did I feel like I did enough? I’m probably one of my biggest critics. I feel like there’s a lot of things that I could have done better. If I was pitching myself, for me, it’s just simple. I come to work hard every day; great individual. I know the plays, (and) I’m a great special teams player. So, that’s about all I can say. My work speaks for itself.”

RB Michael Ford: “You can’t get into the coaches' head. You’ve got to let the coaches coach and do what they do. The only thing we can go out there and do is play and play hard. I gave it my all. I went into practice and gave it my all, and went into the games and gave it my all. I really can’t worry about it. When you give it your all and did everything you could, you can’t worry about it, because you know you gave 100 percent at what you did.”

WR Joe Anderson: “I’ve always felt confident. I believe in myself regardless of who else does. When you believe in yourself, you win. I believe in me. If you ask me, I believe I made this team. But you never know what someone else is thinking. So I just come to work every day and do my job. I control what I can control, (and) that’s what I do on the field. So upstairs, that’s their job. I’m gonna let them do their job, and I’ll do my job.”

OL Eben Britton: “I feel good about it. I feel really good about it. Yeah, I feel like (I made this team). I’m not the type of guy to beat my chest too much, but I was really proud of myself just about how I approached the whole camp, and what I got out of it. I feel the best I’ve felt in years. It was a great training camp for me, and I feel really good about the future. Now, I feel like I do things without even thinking about it anymore. It’s just starting to become natural because that’s what (offensive coordinator Aaron) Kromer has taught us every day. Even since back in April, I just kept working on the techniques we were taught in the run game and the pass game, stayed focused, and I just feel really good about how far I’ve come since getting here.”
  • Considering the limited prep time given recently signed quarterbacks Jordan Palmer and Trent Edwards, the duo performed fairly well against Cleveland, especially Palmer. He completed 11 of 17 for 11 yards and a touchdown to finish with a passer rating of 102.8.“I’ve prepared for this game as much as I’ve ever prepared for a game,” Palmer said. “It was a lot of fun to go out there, and I feel like we moved the ball and did some good things.”Trestman has said his preference is to keep three quarterbacks on the 53-man roster. So if that holds true over the next two days, ESPNChicago.com colleague Jeff Dickerson says it would be hard to imagine the Bears cutting ties with Palmer.
  • Rookie cornerback Demontre Hurst didn’t hurt his cause, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Hurst probably didn’t help it much, either. Last year, former seventh-round pick Greg McCoy ran back an interception for a touchdown in the preseason finale at Cleveland, but still wound up among the final cuts. But to Hurst’s credit, his preseason was better than McCoy’s in 2012. In addition to the interception, Hurst posted five tackles in addition to forcing Brian Hoyer into an intentional grounding penalty.
  • Brad Biggs says the Bears are interested in quarterbacks who have practice squad eligibility remaining, and one of them is former Vanderbilt quarterback Jordan Rodgers, the younger brother of Green Bay signal caller Aaron Rodgers.
  • Inconsistency has been the story of training camp for tight end Fendi Onobun. The Bears have a difficult decision to make here, and it will likely take place Friday.Trestman explained that “when the light switch goes on” for Onobun, “he’s got a chance to be a very good player. We have some tough decisions to make, and certainly Fendi is going to be in the mix when we make these decisions because of what he showed tonight again, and what he’s shown in practice.”What I saw was merely another up-and-down performance.
  • Here's my take on J'Marcus Webb from Thursday night's game. Not good, not bad, just mediocre, which likely won't be good enough for him to make this team. Obviously, everyone wanted to speak with Webb after the game. But once officials opened the locker room, Webb was already gone, his locker cleaned out.

Rapid Reaction: Browns 18, Bears 16

August, 29, 2013
8/29/13
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CHICAGO -- Here are a few quick thoughts from the Chicago Bears18-16 loss Thursday night to the Cleveland Browns in the exhibition finale:

What it means: It’s finally time for real football. The Bears showed gradual improvement over three games before sitting the starters for the finale. Now it’s time to cut down to the final 53-man roster, a process that begins Friday morning.

Palmer shines: Recently signed quarterback Jordan Palmer put together a sharp performance despite just one week of practice. Signed to replace Matt Blanchard, Palmer connected on 11 of 17 passes for 111 yards and a touchdown to finish with a passer rating of 102.8.

“It says a lot about his preparation,” Bears coach Marc Trestman said. “He has learned a lot of offense and spent a lot of time on his own trying to assimilate all of it. I’m happy for him. He came out and played very efficiently.”

If the Bears keep three quarterbacks, Palmer likely makes the team.

Rookie starters on right side? Every uninjured starter suited up, but the distribution of repetitions may have told the story. Trestman refrained last week from naming rookies Kyle Long and Jordan Mills starters. But the fact they didn’t play against the Browns means the Bears wanted to eliminate the prospect of injury, which likely means they’re the starters for the Sept. 8 opener.

Long made his first preseason start on Aug. 15, as did Mills. The rookies started again in the third preseason game, which is typically the team’s most important game in assessing personnel.

With Long and Mills and the other starters, the Bears likely will keep three reserve linemen for a total of eight. Perhaps it’s telling that James Brown didn’t play, nor did Eben Britton (until Corey Brandon was carted off with 2:13 left to play), while former starting right tackle J’Marcus Webb started.

Based on what took place, it’s likely the Bears keep the starting five along with Brown, Britton and Jonathan Scott -- who missed the game recovering from a knee procedure -- as the three reserves.

Anderson reappears: After catching two passes for 27 yards in the preseason opener against Carolina, receiver Joe Anderson disappeared, going without a catch in the next two games.

But against the Browns, Anderson caught four passes for 64 yards, in addition to hauling in a 5-yard touchdown from Palmer in the second quarter.

What’s next: The Bears need to cut to the final 53-man roster by 5 p.m. CT on Saturday, and any players they want to add to the practice squad will need to clear waivers. After taking off the weekend, the Bears will return to Halas Hall on Monday to prepare for the opener against Cincinnati.

Bears' offensive starters vs. Cleveland

August, 29, 2013
8/29/13
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CHICAGO – Offensive starters for the Chicago Bears in tonight’s preseason finale against the Cleveland Browns:

WR – Joe Anderson
LT – Cory Brandon
LG – Edwin Williams
C – Taylor Boggs
RG – Derek Dennis
RT – J’Marcus Webb
TE – Kyle Adams
HB - Fendi Onobun
WR – Terrence Toliver
QB – Jordan Palmer
RB – Armando Allen

Melton, Bennett still out

August, 26, 2013
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LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- The Chicago Bears returned to the field to resume workouts Monday, but continued to hold out defensive tackle Henry Melton and receiver Earl Bennett as the duo works through the steps of the concussion protocol to return to the field.

Melton and Bennett attended the session inside the Walter Payton Center during the portion of practice open to the media, but it appears neither has been cleared to return to activity. Considering the starters aren’t likely to play much, if any, during the preseason finale against Cleveland on Thursday, there’s no rush for Melton and Bennett to return to the field.

“Henry is into (the) running (phase of the concussion protocol). Earl is day-to-day. I know (Bennett) was with some of the medical people this morning, I haven’t checked," Trestman said. "Henry ran today. He’s going to run tomorrow and Wednesday and pick up that running significantly. That’s where he is at this point."

The Bears have already begun preparations for the regular-season opener against the Cincinnati Bengals on Sept. 8, and the week leading into that outing would seem to be the target date for Melton and Bennett to rejoin the team for workouts.

As the club’s franchise player, Melton has already solidified his status as a starter. Bennett, meanwhile, is competing with Joe Anderson, Eric Weems, Terrence Toliver and rookie Marquess Wilson for one of the receiver spots behind Brandon Marshall and Alshon Jeffery. Bennett hasn’t practiced with the team since suffering the concussion on Aug. 3 at Soldier Field after a hard hit from safety Chris Conte.

Melton suffered his concussion in the first game of the preseason at Carolina.

In other injury news, the team held out quarterback Matt Blanchard (hand), linebacker D.J. Williams (calf), offensive tackle Jonathan Scott (knee), defensive tackle (Corvey Irvin) (ankle), cornerback Zack Bowman (hamstring) and linebacker J.T. Thomas (hamstring).

The projected starter at middle linebacker, Williams hasn't yet played in a preseason game, but he's into the running phase of his rehabilitation.

"If you saw him at the (Oakland) game, he was out working at the game," Trestman said. "He's day-to-day, but we'll see where it goes. We're optimistic he's gonna be close (to fully healthy by opening day). It's still day-to-day, but there is progress."

With Williams out of action, rookie second-round pick Jonathan Bostic has filled in at middle linebacker and put together some solid performances throughout the preseason. Still, Trestman wasn't ready to declare Bostic the starter in the middle.

"I am not going to use that term "starting middle linebacker,"" Trestman said. "He has started in the last couple games, and I think he has continued to grow and get better, and (has) shown he can be a very good player in this league. I think he's getting better. He is fitting in. If he happens to be the guy who is that guy Game 1 or Game 2, or whatever it is, I think he can grow into the position and be a more than sufficient middle linebacker in this league."

In other news, fullback Harvey Unga (ribs), defensive end Cheta Ozougwu (hamstring), and long snapper Patrick Mannelly returned to the practice field Monday after missing last week’s game at Oakland.

Melton, Bennett (concussions) on the mend

August, 20, 2013
8/20/13
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LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Defensive tackle Henry Melton and wide receiver Earl Bennett remained sidelined on Tuesday due to concussions, but both players watched practice from the sidelines for the first time since the Chicago Bears concluded the Bourbonnais portion of their training camp on Aug. 13.

However, Melton and Bennett have still not passed the NFL concussion protocol to return to action, and therefore both continue to be off-limits to the media, per league rules.

While veteran Nate Collins has elevated his game filling in for Melton at defensive tackle, the picture at the No. 3 wide receiver spot is cloudier with Bennett out. Wideouts Joe Anderson, Marquess Wilson, Eric Weems, Terrence Toliver and Devin Aromashodu have all been given an opportunity to run with the first and second teams in recent weeks, but quarterback Jay Cutler said on Tuesday that he has no input on which specific player would fill the void left by Bennett if his absence continues to drag on.

"They don't give me an opinion so we'll see who they throw in there," Cutler said. "We'll see who Marc (Trestman), Phil (Emery) and those guys like. Whoever is out there I trust that they can get the job done."

In other injury news, quarterback Matt Blanchard (hand), fullback Harvey Unga (rib), defensive end Cheta Ozougwu (hamstring), linebacker D.J. Williams (calf), long snapper Patrick Mannelly (rib), offensive tackle Jonathan Scott (knee) and defensive tackle Corvey Irvin (ankle) were all held out of Tuesday's practice.

The news on Blanchard is encouraging. The second-year quarterback is expected to miss about a month, but could still have a role on the team in 2013 in some capacity. Blanchard also remains eligible for the practice squad.

Earl Bennett (concussion) remains away

August, 12, 2013
8/12/13
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BOURBONNAIS, Ill. -- Wide receiver Earl Bennett remained at home on Monday, nine days after he left the annual Family Night practice held at Soldier Field with a concussion. Bennett did not travel to Charlotte, N.C., last week for the Chicago Bears' preseason opener, and is day-to-day according to the team.

Coach Marc Trestman was asked on Monday if Bennett had experienced any setbacks since he began to go through the NFL's concussion protocol in order to receive the necessary clearance to resume football-related activities.

"I think he's just in the protocol," Trestman said. "He's at home and there's been no change from Sunday. I always walk in there and check to see where he's at and I generally text him after practice so there's no change from Sunday."

Bennett suffered a concussion last season versus the Seattle Seahawks and had to miss two games.

In other injury news, offensive tackle Jonathan Scott (knee), linebacker D.J. Williams (calf), fullback Harvey Unga (rib), long snapper Patrick Mannelly (rib), defensive tackle Henry Melton (concussion) and running back Armando Allen (hamstring) were all held out of Monday’s session.

Allen’s hamstring injury has been classified as “week-to-week” by the Bears.

Defensive end Cheta Ozougwu also hurt his hamstring and finished practice with his right left wrapped in ice.

Wide receiver Joe Anderson returned to practice after missing time with a bad shoulder, while Corey Wootton (calf) practiced without restrictions after being limited over the weekend. Linebacker Patrick Trahan rejoined the club after being excused on Sunday.
Marquess WilsonAP Photo/Nam Y. HuhMarquess Wilson impressed with four catches for 82 yards in the preseason opener on Thursday.
BOURBONNAIS, Ill. -- Chicago Bears special teams coach Joe DeCamillis reinforced the notion Monday that rookie receiver Marquess Wilson needs to show something in the third phase to provide the most optimal route toward making the 53-man roster.

Wilson wowed observers in the preseason opener at Carolina by catching four passes for 82 yards, including a 58-yarder. But to stand out in the competition for one of the final roster spots at receiver, Wilson needs to display versatility as a special teamer. Wilson also needs to show the staff he's not afraid to strike an opponent.

"We're going to put him out there and see what he can do," DeCamillis said. "We'd like to see what kind of a contact player he is."

Proving that he's indeed a contact player could prove difficult for Wilson, listed seemingly generously at 6-foot-4, 184 pounds.

"For the first time playing (special teams), it's fun. You never know what to expect," Wilson said. "(Playing special teams) gives everybody an extra opportunity. If you're a young guy, that's what you look to do. You look forward to that coming in because you have to play special teams."

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Wilson on spot to find special teams role

August, 11, 2013
8/11/13
7:35
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BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – Wide receiver Marquess Wilson's sole responsibility in three years at Washington State was to catch the football, a job the Chicago Bears’ 2013 seventh-round draft choice excelled at.

[+] EnlargeMarquess Wilson
AP Photo/Bob LeveroneThe Bears' Marquess Wilson, center, runs for a long gain after a catch against the Panthers on Friday.
Wilson left school as the Cougars’ all-time leader in receiving yards (3,207), while ranking second in school history in receptions (189) and touchdown catches (23). Those numbers look even more impressive when you factor in that Wilson played in only 33 career games with 27 starts before leaving the team last year after a fallout with WSU head coach Mike Leach.

Wilson flashed in the Bears’ first preseason game with an impressive 58-yard catch in Carolina.

But one area Wilson did not contribute in college was on special teams, a phase of the game that almost every NFL reserve player must embrace in order to earn a spot in the 53-man roster. Wilson said the Bears are taking a look at him on the punt (gunner) and kickoff team.

“It was different coming from college where I never played special teams, Wilson said. “But (I’ll do) anything to get on the field.”

Bears head coach Marc Trestman stressed on Sunday the importance of Wilson making a mark on special teams. Otherwise, can the Bears afford to carry him on the 53-man roster?

“I think the truth of it is and the content of it is he’s shown he can do it (special teams) and then he’ll fall off and then we’ll have to pick him up again,” Trestman said. “He’s got to understand it’s so important for him to be a special teams player for us if he becomes a fourth or a fifth wide receiver and he is competing to be a fourth or a fifth wide receiver and you can see what Joe Anderson and Eric Weems do for us. That’s part of the job for a receiver that is not one of the top three, he’s got to be an active special teams player and give us the kind of play that Joe and Eric give us on special teams at this point.

“So, he’s just starting to understand the importance. I have seen him out there and when he’s active and when he’s focused he shows that he has the ability to do it. He’s a young player, he’s probably never done it before but he’s got to recognize how important it is because of where he would be on the roster presently to make special teams a priority as all the guys who are looking for roster spots who are not starters. We talk about that every day and I think it’s become clearer to him now and I think we’re going to see more because he’s shown flashes of it in practice.”

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Five things to watch: Bears-Panthers

August, 9, 2013
8/09/13
9:00
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Jay Cutler AP Photo/Nam Y. HuhJay Cutler is expected to play a series or two against the Panthers on Friday.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Here are five things to keep an eye on Friday night when the Chicago Bears face the Carolina Panthers at Bank of America Stadium.

1. OL blocking: It's likely the Bears go into this game with a starting five up front that you won't see once the club opens the regular season Sept. 8 against Cincinnati, mainly because of the calf strain suffered by starting left tackle Jermon Bushrod, who isn't expected to play. The plan is to play the starters just a few snaps. So in that limited amount of time it's important to see how well the group protects and opens the lanes in the ground game given all the changes made schematically. Count on a starting five of Roberto Garza, James Brown, Eben Britton, J'Marcus Webb and Matt Slauson. Rookie Kyle Long should see plenty of snaps, too, and is also a player to keep close tabs on. The only way skill-position players such as quarterback Jay Cutler, receiver Brandon Marshall and running back Matt Forte excel is for the offensive line to sufficiently do its job. If in limited duty, the starting offensive line performs similarly to the way the group played in 2012, it will be clear the group still needs extensive work.

2. Cutler's command of the offense: Cutler is in the midst of learning his fourth offense in five seasons with the Bears, and it would be unrealistic to expect him to operate flawlessly against the Panthers. But he does need to show some degree of command of the new system. So far during training camp practices, for whatever reason, the timing between Cutler and the receiving corps appears to be off. Some of that is a function of Chicago's defensive line bearing down hard on Cutler every play during training camp, and tipping many of his passes at the line of scrimmage. But in this game, the offensive line will have every tactic at its disposal to combat Carolina's pass rush. That should open up some passing lanes for Cutler to be able to find some type of rhythm. It's also worth it to watch how quickly the Bears get in and out of the huddle. The club unnecessarily burned timeouts too often last season, and Marc Trestman's system contains much more verbiage than some of the schemes Cutler has operated in the past.

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McClellin interception highlights practice

August, 6, 2013
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[+] EnlargeShea McClellin
Bradley Leeb/US PresswireShea McClellin said he feels faster, and it showed on a nice play Tuesday.
BOURBONNAIS, Ill. – In a practice filled with defensive highlights, defensive end Shea McClellin authored the play of the day on Tuesday when he sniffed out a screen pass and intercepted a hard-thrown ball from quarterback Jay Cutler in the flat.

McClellin initially rushed up field on the play from his end spot before anticipating the throw by Cutler and coming down with a difficult catch. If the sequence had occurred in a real game, McClellin would have scored an easy defensive touchdown.

"I was just doing my job and reading my keys," McClellin said. "The ball was right there so I picked it off. I was just doing my job. I feel faster out there than I did in the spring after I lost eight pounds. I still feel like I get a little heavier, but I'll work on that after camp.

McClellin has been in a groove the last week, routinely winning one-on-one battles with offensive lineman in individual and team drills. The likely plan for the former first-round pick is to move him around the defensive front, lining him up in a two-point or three-point stance depending on the defensive call or the matchup, while sometimes requiring that he cover a tight end or guard the flat on passing downs.

The Bears asked McClellin to do some of that last year as a rookie, but expect to see more of it in 2013. That's because McClellin should receive a significant boost in play-time in the Bears' three-man starting defensive end rotation that also includes Julius Peppers and Corey Wootton.

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Jonathan BosticAP Photo/Nam Y. HuhRookie linebacker Jon Bostic drew positive reviews for his play-calling on Thursday.
BOURBONNAIS, Ill. -- The Chicago Bears held out linebacker Lance Briggs (rest) for Thursday's practice, thrusting rookie second-round pick Jon Bostic -- who was filling in for injured middle linebacker D.J. Williams -- into the role of playcaller on defense.

Bostic drew positive reviews for his first day making the calls.

"He did very very well," defensive end Julius Peppers said. "We're going to need him. We hope Lance doesn't go down, but he could. All of us could go down. So whenever somebody goes down, the next player has to be up. So we've got to get him ready because we might need him one of those games."

The Bears could wind up needing Bostic sooner than originally anticipated. The club drafted Bostic with the expectation he would spend 2013 learning behind Williams, a 10-year veteran, who at one time was considered one of the NFL's most talented middle linebackers. Williams suffered a strained right calf on Wednesday, and the prognosis given by the team has been "week to week," which means the injury could linger.

"I really don't look at it as getting thrown in the fire," Bostic said. "I'm out there with a lot of guys I've pretty much watched on TV the last 10 or 12 years, however long I’ve been watching football. To be in there with them, I’ve got to pick it up. I've got to go out there and make sure I'm in my playbook off the field so I'm not making any mistakes when I'm out there."

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BOURBONNAIS, Ill. -- Pro Bowl cornerback Tim Jenning's excused absence on Wednesday bumped Zack Bowman up to the first team defense, a spot the veteran used to occupy on a full-time basis in 2009 and parts of 2010.

The Bears let Bowman leave via free agency in the spring of 2012, but eventually re-signed him in October of that year. Bowman went on to become one of the best special teamers on the roster, recording a career-high 11 special teams stops in just 11 games. That performance was good enough for Bowman to earn another one-year contract from the Bears in free agency in March.

Although Bowman has played sparingly on defense the past two seasons, he appears to be entrenched as the Bears' No. 3 cornerback behind starters Jennings and Charles Tillman, not including Kelvin Hayden, who has been playing inside at the nickel back position.

"Things are going well," Bowman said. "You know this is my sixth year in the system so I feel comfortable coming out here every day. For me, it's about executing my assignment, alignment and technique. Those are the three things I focus on every day."

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WSU WR Wilson a low-risk proposition

April, 27, 2013
4/27/13
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LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- It’s impossible to predict if wide receiver Marquess Wilson will land on the Chicago Bears' final 53-man roster after the way his college career unraveled at Washington State.

[+] EnlargeMarquess Wilson
James Snook/US PresswireMarquess Wilson's decision to walk away from Washington State cost him in the draft.
Wilson quit the team last year and accused Cougars head coach Mike Leach of abuse, a story he eventually recanted.

But the damage was done.

Wilson’s decision to walk away from Washington State for the final three games of 2012 and the subsequent controversy with Leach overshadowed what been a productive college career. The wideout posted back-to-back seasons of 1,000-plus receiving yards in 2010 and 2011, catching a career-best 82 balls for 1,388 yards and 12 touchdowns his sophomore season.

Wilson made 52 catches for 813 yards and five touchdowns last year before he pulled the plug. He still left Washington State as the school’s all-time leader in receiving yards with 3,207, the ninth-most in Pac-12 history.

Wilson had 14 100-yard games.

From a pure talent standpoint, Wilson deserved to be drafted higher, but his stock plummeted for obvious reasons.

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