Chicago Bears: Mike LeShoure

NFC North second quarter Stock Watch

November, 7, 2012
11/07/12
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As we noted last month, we've done away with the weekly Stock Watch post and instead will hit it after every quarter of the season. Here's what we posted after every NFC North team had played four games, and below is our assessment now that everyone has played at least half of the games on their 2012 schedule. I'm such a happy guy that I went crazy and shifted a slot from our "Falling" category to "Rising" to reflect the fact that all four of our teams are at least .500 at the moment. The glass is half-full up in here.

FALLING

[+] EnlargeChristian Ponder
Stephen Brashear/Getty ImagesChristian Ponder has thrown six interceptions in the past four games, three of them losses.
1. Minnesota Vikings' vision: The most important task facing the Vikings this season was not challenging for a postseason spot, something a 5-3 record through eight games put them in position to do. Instead, it was developing and cementing quarterback Christian Ponder as their long-term answer at the position. Ponder made clear progress during training camp and played efficiently in the Vikings' conservative structure early this season. But a slump has now extended to five games, lowlighted by a pair of sub-70 yard efforts, and raised an uncomfortable specter. If Ponder can't straighten himself out, his second NFL season will be a failure. The Vikings' long-term plan centers around his successful development. Would they give him an unchallenged third season to prove himself? Or would they need to start considering contingency plans? NFL franchises are lost without a quarterback, putting the Vikings at a critical point under their current leadership.

2. Health in Green Bay: Nearly half of the Green Bay Packers' Week 1 lineup has missed at least one game because of injuries. All told, the Packers have lost 40 starts from players who were either listed as the starters on the team's opening depth chart or moved into that role as a result of other injuries. They face a post-bye landscape without receiver Greg Jennings, right tackle Bryan Bulaga, running back Cedric Benson, linebackers Nick Perry and Clay Matthews, and cornerback Charles Woodson, for various periods of time. Receiver Jordy Nelson's status is uncertain. Optimists recall the Packers won the Super Bowl two years ago with 15 players on injured reserve. A realist would wonder how likely it is to repeat that feat under such circumstances.

RISING

1. Cornerbacks in Chicago: Even in a passing league, NFL teams have devalued the cornerback position in favor of pass rushers in recent years. Conventional wisdom has suggested that rules inhibiting aggressive coverage made pressure a better defensive weapon. But the Chicago Bears have proved otherwise this season, getting dominant performances from cornerbacks Charles Tillman and Tim Jennings both in coverage and playmaking. Their coverage has helped the Bears' pass rush compile an NFL-high 21 sacks from a standard four-man alignment, and as playmakers they've contributed a combined eight interceptions, three touchdowns, 21 defensed passes and seven forced fumbles. Oh, and they're combining to earn $6.55 million this season. That might have to change between now and the start of the 2013 season.

2. Scott Linehan, Detroit Lions offensive coordinator: The Lions have faced considerable criticism for not forcing more downfield passes against defenses who are blatantly aligned to stop those plays. That strength-on-strength argument sounds good around the water cooler, but it's a suicidal long-term approach. Linehan and coach Jim Schwartz understood that and, from the beginning, have insisted on a traditional antidote: The running game. Personnel shortages made that difficult earlier this season, but the emergence of Mikel Leshoure and Joique Bell provide hope for the second half of the season. The two combined for 149 yards on 29 carries last Sunday against the Jacksonville Jaguars, and Leshoure scored three touchdowns. Linehan deserves credit for maintaining a sane thought process amid early season panic around the team. A successful running game might not force radical defensive changes, but it will give the Lions a reliable way to move the ball and score if they don't.

3. Adrian Peterson, Vikings running back: Exactly 315 days ago, Peterson's left knee was a mangled mess. We've already noted his stunning comeback, but it's worth updating after his 182-yard performance last Sunday against the Seattle Seahawks. In his past three games alone, Peterson has amassed 458 yards and four touchdowns, including breakaway runs of 74 and 64 yards. He leads the NFL in rushing yards (his total of 957 this season is 163 more than the NFL's next-most productive running back), yards from scrimmage (1,107), yards per carry (5.7), yards after contact (515) and runs of at least 20 yards (11). His comeback has been no less impressive than that of Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, and his recovery came in less than half the time.

4. Jay Cutler, Bears quarterback: From this vantage point, Cutler made substantial progress on multiple fronts over the past month. We got to the point where Cutler's quirks and sideline exchanges became a matter of course rather than cause for personality debates. We acknowledged how good he has been in clutch situations. And now we should note that the Bears are 12-1 in Cutler's past 13 starts dating to last season. Since the start of the 2010 season, in fact, the Bears have a .750 winning percentage in his starts (24-9). For reference, the Packers have a .769 winning percentage under quarterback Aaron Rodgers in that same span.

Kiper projects strong Illini draft day

March, 10, 2011
3/10/11
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Mikel LeShoureThomas Campbell/US PresswireMikel Leshoure may be the second-best every-down back in the draft behind Mark Ingram.
ESPN draft analyst Mel Kiper figures that by the end of the second round three Illinois juniors could be off the board.

That's a product of former Fighting Illini defensive tackle Corey Liuget, running back Mikel LeShoure and linebacker Martez Wilson all getting "hot at the right time," Kiper said, with strong workouts last month at the NFL Combine.

"They're all guys that are hot right now," Kiper said. "LeShoure is getting a lot of positive commentary, Liuget's been hot through the process, and certainly Wilson has as well. They're all kind of peaking at the right time in terms of the interest and the momentum they're gaining.

"So when the second round has ended, three players from the Fighting Illini are gonna be off the board."

Liuget is projected to go first, followed by LeShoure, who is considered a late-first to early-second-round prospect, and Wilson -- a Simeon grad and second-round prospect -- who is considered the best of what Kiper called "a bad inside-linebacker group".

Liuget compares favorably to former Bears defensive tackle Tommie Harris because of his quick, penetrating style of play, and he finished his three-year career at Illinois with 125 tackles -- including 25.5 for lost yardage -- and 8 1/2 sacks.

"A lot of people like this kid for good reason: He's got a ton of talent," Kiper said. "He's a guy right now [who as the] 14[th pick] to St. Louis would make sense."

Kiper considers LeShoure to be the second-best every-down running back of the 2011 draft class behind Alabama's Mark Ingram. LeShoure set school records for points (122) and touchdowns (20) in a season, and broke Illinois' single-game rushing record with a 330-yard effort against Northwestern at Wrigley Field.

Leshoure also tied for sixth in career rushing (2,557 yards) at Illinois ahead of former Illini stars Pierre Thomas and Rashard Mendenhall. Kiper doesn't think Leshoure is as talented as Mendenhall, but still worthy of a look in the first round.

"I like Leshoure, but I like him as a late 1, early-to-mid 2," Kiper said. "I think he's a borderline first-round pick specifically after the workout. I think Leshoure is no worst than a two."

Wilson, meanwhile, is considered the best among a weak 2011 class of inside linebackers "by a significant margin," Kiper said.

Wilson ran the fastest time (4.49 seconds) in the 40-yard dash among linebackers at the NFL Combine, and is coming off a junior season in which he finally justified all the hype thrust upon him coming out of high school.
After underperforming his first two seasons and suffering a neck injury in 2009, Wilson rebounded in 2010 to post 112 tackles (including 11.5 for lost yardage), and four sacks in addition to forcing three fumbles, deflecting four passes and blocking a kick.

"He really stepped forward this year," Kiper said. "He had all that hype coming out of high school. Then finally this year, I thought he really took it to a new level after being a relative disappointment early on. He had the injury, and then he comes back from it and he's playing lights-out football, and he's had great workouts. He's got a chance to be an early-to-mid second-round pick."

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