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Friday, December 27, 2013
Toews fixes scoring issue quickly

By Scott Powers

CHICAGO -- Chicago Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews spoke of his desire to score more goals around 11:30 a.m. on Friday in the team's dressing room.

Less than 12 hours later, Toews was back in the dressing room talking about the two goals he scored in the Blackhawks' 7-2 win against the Colorado Avalanche. Toews came into the game with only one goal in his past 14 games and none in his previous five games.

Toews was pleased he put his words into action so quickly, and he now plans on keeping them in action.

"I think I'll continue that the next little while," Toews said. "I think it should be part of my game to go out there with that intent to be a little more determined. I don't want to be selfish sometimes, but to put pucks on net more often than not.

"Whether we score or not, there's going to be second opportunities. I feel like I was thinking about that tonight, and it was nice to see a couple go in. It helps the confidence for sure."

Toews began the night with a nightmarish miss. Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith created an open net for Toews by faking a shot in the left circle and passing the puck quickly to Toews on the right side in the game's first minute. Toews saw the play unfold and was ready, but his shot still went wide left.

"Yeah, that didn't feel good," Toews said with a laugh. "It's not a great way to start the game when you have a great opportunity like that. Duncs made a great pass. I was expecting it all the way and just try to get it on net, but didn't do a very good job of that, I guess."

Toews made up for the miscue later in the period when he scored on a rebound. Toews added his second goal of the night and his 15th of the season in the second period.

Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville said Friday morning he wasn't worried about Toews' scoring, and he said it again on Friday night.

"Guys like that, they go in for you eventually by doing the right things," Quenneville said.