Chicago Colleges: Max Shortell

Poll: Big Ten QB with most to prove?

March, 1, 2013
3/01/13
1:30
PM CT
We've examined all the major quarterback competitions around the Big Ten entering spring practice. Now it's time to identify the quarterback who has the most to prove in the spring.

For that, we need your help.

SportsNation

Which Big Ten quarterback has the most to prove this spring?

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    45%
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    10%
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    6%
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    21%
  •  
    18%

Discuss (Total votes: 5,127)

Several Big Ten quarterbacks with starting experience find themselves in the middle of competitions. Some are dealing with new head coaches and/or new coordinators. Two are coming off of major injuries. Who has the most to prove this spring?

Here are the options:

Andrew Maxwell, Michigan State: Maxwell completed just 52.5 percent of his passes in his first season as Michigan State's starting quarterback. He averaged 200 pass yards a game and finished with 13 touchdowns and nine interceptions, but Michigan State's offense struggled to find the end zone or consistently move the ball. Maxwell started all 13 games in 2012, but was replaced by Connor Cook in the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl against TCU. He has to re-establish himself as Michigan State's top option at quarterback and impress new coordinator Jim Bollman.

Philip Nelson, Minnesota: The Gophers accelerated their future by taking the redshirt off Nelson midway through the 2012 season. He started the final seven games at quarterback following injuries to MarQueis Gray and Max Shortell. Nelson showed some flashes early, struggled mightily down the stretch in Big Ten play, and then had two touchdown strikes in the bowl game against Texas Tech. Another offseason could really help his progress, but he'll face competition this spring from redshirt freshman Mitch Leidner.

Tre Roberson, Indiana: After becoming the first true freshman quarterback to start in team history, Roberson entered 2012 as the Hoosiers' top option and looked good in the first five quarters of the season before suffering a broken leg against Massachusetts. He's fully cleared for spring practice and has looked good in winter workouts, but he has to beat out Cameron Coffman and Nate Sudfeld for the starting job. Coffman started IU's final 10 games after Roberson's injury and finished second in the league in passing average (248.5 ypg), and Sudfeld performed well at times.

Nathan Scheelhaase, Illinois: It's odd to see one of the nation's most experienced quarterbacks (36 career starts) included in this group. But after a solid performance in the 2010 Texas Bowl and a strong start to 2011, Scheelhaase, like his team, has struggled for the past year and a half. Every starter is on notice after Illinois finished 119th nationally in both scoring and total offense last season. Reilly O'Toole could push Scheelhaase this spring, and Scheelhaase has to prove himself to new coordinator Bill Cubit.

Joel Stave, Wisconsin: The Badgers' piano-playing, Train-loving signal caller rejoins a crowded mix at quarterback this spring. Stave entered the starting lineup as a redshirt freshman last season and was making significant strides before suffering a broken collarbone against Michigan State. He showed good accuracy at times despite limited pass-catching options, and grades high in pass efficiency, a hallmark for Wisconsin quarterbacks. But Stave has to win over a new coaching staff and separate himself from a pool of quarterbacks that includes Curt Phillips, Danny O'Brien, Bart Houston and junior-college arrival Tanner McEvoy.

Northwestern survives as defense responds

October, 13, 2012
10/13/12
3:55
PM CT

For the second consecutive week, Northwestern's defense looked to be on the ropes in the fourth quarter, trying to protect a lead on the road.

This time, the Wildcats stood their ground.

In a sloppy game where Northwestern's offense started fast on Saturday and then disappeared, the defense stepped up in the clutch and prevented Minnesota from scoring the potential game-tying touchdown. Northwestern survived 21-13 to improve to 6-1, becoming bowl-eligible for the sixth consecutive season. Minnesota (4-2, 0-2 Big Ten) dropped its second straight Legends Division game and remains two wins away from bowl eligibility.

Northwestern had no pass rush to speak of last week at Penn State, but the front four stepped up in the fourth quarter. Defensive end Tyler Scott had a pair of sacks, including a forced fumble on the game's final play, and fellow end Quentin Williams also stepped up with a pass deflection that led to an interception. Northwestern gave up more yards (327-275) and first downs (21-13) but not points.

It could have been a different ending had Minnesota quarterback MarQueis Gray remained healthy. Gray returned from a high-ankle sprain that had kept him out two games and performed well in the first half, but he re-injured his left knee on a third-quarter run and didn't return. Max Shortell never really got in a rhythm, starting the game but exiting quickly for Gray before re-entering in the second half. He missed several open receivers, including Isaac Fruechte in the end zone, and held the ball way too long in crunch time.

The game looked like a shootout early, as Northwestern scored on the first play from scrimmage on a Venric Mark touchdown run after Minnesota fumbled the opening kickoff. Mark was masterful once again, racking up 151 rush yards and two touchdowns on 11 carries in the first half. Northwestern scored 21 points in the first 18 minutes but then began stumbling, committing a host of penalties and curious play calls. The quarterback rotation that worked well earlier in the season seemed to fizzle Saturday, as Northwestern couldn't convert third downs (1-for-9), its former trademark, and offensive coordinator Mick McCall didn't trust Kain Colter on any downfield throws. Colter certainly looked like the better option Saturday, going 10-for-10 on pass attempts and adding 26 rush yards and a touchdown.

Mark finished with 182 rush yards on 20 carries.

Northwestern definitely went conservative at the end, taking a delay of game penalty on third down, clearly concerned about the weather. While the approach paid off against a Minnesota team that made too many mistakes, it likely will cost the Wildcats down the line.

It rained for most of the game, and the outcome came down to key mistakes. Minnesota had two first-half turnovers that Northwestern converted for touchdowns. The Wildcats, while committing an uncharacteristic 11 penalties, didn't have a turnover.

Northwestern remains very much alive in the Legends Division race and returns home for two division contests (Nebraska and Iowa). The Wildcats need to be a lot better than they were Saturday but can take some positives with Mark and the defense.

Minnesota is a different team with Gray on the field and hopes the senior can return for next week's rivalry game at Wisconsin.

Big Ten power rankings: Week 6

October, 1, 2012
10/01/12
9:00
AM CT
The Big Ten still is a mostly muddled mess after the first Saturday of league play. While Penn State made a statement and Iowa showed it shouldn't be counted out, few other squads looked truly impressive in Week 5. Wisconsin looked better than it has but still fell at Nebraska, and while Michigan State came close against Ohio State, the Spartans still haven't turned the corner on offense.

There's no shuffling at the top and very little separation throughout the rankings. Although both Wisconsin and Michigan State fall, while Penn State rises, you can slide a sheet of paper between these teams. Ohio State remains at the top but will be tested this week by Nebraska.

Let's get to the rundown ...

1. Ohio State (5-0, 1-0 Big Ten, last week: 1): It's not easy to overcome three turnovers on the road, but the Buckeyes received enough magic from quarterback Braxton Miller and solid play along both lines at Michigan State. Linebacker Etienne Sabino stepped up in a big way for the defense. Urban Meyer's team has its flaws, but it can still win a lot of games in a flawed Big Ten. Ohio State showed it can win a big road game. Nebraska provides a nice test this week.

2. Nebraska (4-1, 1-0 Big Ten, last week: 2): After a miserable start against Wisconsin, Nebraska rallied from 17 points down in the third quarter to record a win it absolutely had to have. It tied the second-largest comeback in team history, and provided Taylor Martinez and the offense some confidence heading to Ohio State. The Huskers are loaded with offensive weapons and received terrific linebacker play from Will Compton, Alonzo Whaley and Sean Fisher. They still put the ball on the ground too much, though, and can't afford another slow start in Columbus.

3. Northwestern (5-0, 1-0 Big Ten, last week: 3): Thanks to Kain Colter, Northwestern remained perfect on the season and starts 5-0 for the third time in five years. The concern is that the Wildcats once again couldn't finish off a team after storming out to a 27-0 lead. No lead is truly safe with Northwestern, and while the defense has been very good most of the season, it needs to limit bad quarters like the third on Saturday. This is a young, maturing team that continues to win, but the tests get tougher beginning this week at red-hot Penn State.

4. Michigan (2-2, last week: 5): In this year's sputtering Big Ten, sometimes it pays off not to play. Michigan moves up in the rankings after Purdue struggled to hold off Marshall on Saturday. There's not much separating the Wolverines and the Boilers, and we'll find out the superior team this week when they meet at Ross-Ade Stadium. Michigan's defense took a nice step at Notre Dame, but as usual, the team's fortunes likely rest on how quarterback Denard Robinson performs.

5. Purdue (3-1, last week: 4): After storming out to a 42-14 halftime lead, Purdue had to hold on to win a shootout against Marshall and thus drop a spot. Although the Boilers won't face another passing offense quite like Marshall's this season, they have to be a bit concerned about their defense, which surrendered 439 passing yards and 534 total yards. Purdue faces another spread-ish offense -- and certainly a spread-ish quarterback in Michigan's Robinson -- this week in West Lafayette. The Michigan game begins a defining stretch for Danny Hope's crew.

6. Penn State (3-2, 1-0, last week: 9): The Big Ten's hottest team makes the biggest move of the week, rising three spots after another impressive win against Illinois. Linebacker Michael Mauti is leading a revived defense, while quarterback Matt McGloin continues to perform well in the new offense. You can't say enough about the job Bill O'Brien has done in his first season as Lions coach. Penn State faces its biggest test since the season opener this week against Northwestern before a challenging stretch with three of four on the road.

7. Michigan State (3-2, 0-1, last week: 5): The Spartans lost to Ohio State by only a point and were burned by a premature whistle that killed a potential fumble return for a touchdown. Then again, Michigan State had numerous opportunities to beat Ohio State and held a plus-3 turnover margin on its home field. The offense simply isn't coming together well enough, as good passing Saturday was offset by an invisible Le'Veon Bell. We still think the Spartans can make a run for the Big Ten title, but they haven't looked impressive in the early going.

8. Wisconsin (3-2, 0-1, last week: 8): For a half and change, it looked like Wisconsin would make a major move up the power rankings. The Badgers came out hot against Nebraska and took a big lead behind the inspired play of linebacker Chris Borland and the poise of quarterback Joel Stave in his first career road start. But the same problem that plagued the Badgers in the first four weeks -- flimsy offensive line play -- coupled with a defense that couldn't keep pace with Martinez led to a crushing defeat. Wisconsin still can take some pluses from Saturday night. It needs to take another step this week against Illinois before next week's showdown at Purdue.

9. Iowa (3-2, 1-0, last week: 11): Besides maybe Illinois, no team needed a win in Week 5 more than the Hawkeyes, and they delivered in a big way. Iowa took control from the get-go against Minnesota and brought home the bacon to fill its long-empty trophy case. Running back Mark Weisman continues to be one of the Big Ten's best early season stories, and the Hawkeyes' defense responded well from a poor performance against Central Michigan, receiving great play from the linebackers. An open week comes at a good time before Iowa resumes play at Michigan State.

10. Minnesota (4-1, 0-1, last week: 7): Week 5 brought a reality check of sorts for Minnesota, which never really challenged Iowa and lost the Floyd of Rosedale for the first time since 2009. As coach Jerry Kill said Sunday, the Gophers really need top quarterback MarQueis Gray (ankle) to get healthy, as backup Max Shortell had three interceptions at Iowa. More unsettling was the play of Minnesota's defense, which couldn't stop Weisman. The Gophers can regroup during the bye week before their league home opener against Northwestern.

11. Indiana (2-2, 0-1, last week: 10): Credit the Hoosiers for fighting back at Northwestern and making it a one-possession game in the fourth quarter. Indiana has some serious talent at wide receiver with Kofi Hughes and Cody Latimer, both of whom made circus catches Saturday. The Hoosiers also saw some good signs in their run game. But again, the defense continues to struggle mightily, surrendering more than 700 yards to the Wildcats. Until IU can defend like a Big Ten team, it won't win a Big Ten game.

12. Illinois (2-3, 0-1, last week: 12): Oy vey. If we could drop Illinois to 13th, we would. Tim Beckman's program is in complete disarray just five weeks into his first season. From the turnovers to the special teams miscues to a supposedly elite defense showing cracks each week, Illinois is in a tailspin. The Illini really needed to build some confidence at home. Instead, they're going to have to get it together on the road against Wisconsin and then Michigan. There's a lot of talent in Champaign, but once again, it doesn't seem to matter.

What we learned in the Big Ten: Week 4

September, 23, 2012
9/23/12
8:51
PM CT
Five lessons from the week that was in Big Ten football.

1. Bring on the conference season ... please: There's no way to sugarcoat it. The Big Ten's nonconference schedule (which has two more inconsequential games left) has been a disaster. The league's 33-13 record doesn't begin to tell the story of the train wreck that included losses to three MAC teams, an 0-3 record against Notre Dame, a 1-3 mark against the Pac-12, a loss to Louisiana Tech and several very close calls to non-power-league teams. Michigan State's squeaker over a Boise State team replacing most of its starting lineup remains the Big Ten's signature victory, and Northwestern and Minnesota helped saved the day with a combined 8-0 record, including four wins over BCS AQ teams that won't be in the national title conversation anytime soon. Michigan flopped in its two spotlight games against Alabama and Notre Dame. Michigan State also got clobbered by the Irish, while UCLA ran all over Nebraska. The Big Ten is a national punchline right now, a status it has earned with possibly the worst start in the history of the conference. The good news? League play starts next week, and these teams are all so flawed that it should be as exciting a conference race as there is anywhere. For the Big Ten, it can't start soon enough.

[+] EnlargeMichigan's Denard Robinson
Jonathan Daniel/Getty ImagesMichigan, Denard Robinson and much of the Big Ten took a beating during the nonconference schedule.
2. The I's have it ... rough: It was a disheartening day for Iowa and Illinois. While Iowa has ebbed and flowed during Kirk Ferentz's tenure as coach, has it ever been this bad in Hawkeye Country? It's hard to imagine a lower point for Iowa since 2002 or so than Saturday's 32-31 loss to a weak Central Michigan team at Kinnick Stadium. If it's not the offense for Iowa, it's a defense that couldn't stop Chippewas quarterback Ryan Radcliff. And in the end, Iowa's special teams let it down on an onside kick recovery. We knew Iowa would have some growing pains with a young team and new coordinators, but the Hawkeyes have struggled against two MAC teams and lost to rival Iowa State at home. Hawkeyes fans always have high expectations, especially for their extremely well-compensated coach. The program has completely lost momentum from the 2009 season, and it can only hope Saturday was rock bottom. Meanwhile, Tim Beckman is just starting his program at Illinois, but it's off to a bad start. After a promising opening win over Western Michigan, the Illini have gotten completely waxed by both Arizona State and, in Saturday's home implosion, Louisiana Tech. (The Charleston Southern game was worthless). We knew that Illinois lacked playmakers for Beckman's spread, but it's shocking how easily other spread teams have shredded the once-proud Illini defense. Beckman has a lot of ground to make up in Champaign.

3. Buckeyes, Spartans have work to do before showdown: The Ohio State-Michigan State game in East Lansing looks like the main event of the first Saturday of Big Ten play, but both teams need work in the next six days. Ohio State struggled on its home field for the second straight week Saturday, committing special teams blunders and surrendering 22 first downs and 402 yards to UAB. That might not matter much to Buckeyes assistant Everett Withers, but it's a concern for a unit that had been pegged as one of the Big Ten's best. Then again, Ohio State isn't facing a juggernaut with Michigan State, which needed three and a half quarters to reach the end zone against an Eastern Michigan team that entered the game allowing an average of more than 40 points. Le'Veon Bell is a work horse for the Spartans, but they continue to struggle to stretch the field with the passing game. These teams played a game that made our eyes bleed last year in Columbus. Although this year's contest figures to be more entertaining, both Urban Meyer and Mark Dantonio have a lot to fix.

4. Claims of Penn State's demise were premature: After Penn State dropped its emotionally charged season opener against Ohio and kicked away a sure win at Virginia, many felt the Lions had reached their breaking point after a nightmarish offseason. Predictions of three-win seasons rolled in. Instead, Bill O'Brien's squad has made a nice turnaround and recorded convincing wins against Navy and Temple. The offense is clearly better under O'Brien's leadership, and senior quarterback Matt McGloin looks much more comfortable and efficient. The defense can be dominating at times and bottled up Temple's rushing attack Saturday. Penn State still has its flaws -- too many penalties Saturday -- but so does every Big Ten team. The Lions are starting to hit their stride under O'Brien, and they could make things very interesting in the wide-open Leaders Division.

5. Minnesota could go bowling: Break up the Gophers. They're 4-0 for the first time since 2008 and could make the postseason for the first time since 2009. The biggest difference for this team is on the defensive end, where Minnesota is finally getting a strong pass rush up front with D.L. Wilhite and Ra'Shede Hageman leading the charge. The defense paved the way for a 17-10 win over Syracuse that wasn't as close as the score. Donnell Kirkwood has provided the offense a solid running attack, and the team has proved it can win with either MarQueis Gray or Max Shortell at quarterback. Minnesota isn't a powerhouse yet, and the schedule is going to get a whole lot tougher. But Jerry Kill has guided this program to five straight wins since the end of last season and only needs to match last year's 2-6 Big Ten record to qualify for a bowl. In fact, the Gophers probably will be favored this week at Iowa.

Weekend rewind: Big Ten

September, 17, 2012
9/17/12
10:00
AM CT
Run it back ...

Team of the week: Penn State. No matter what you might think about the school and the football program after the Jerry Sandusky scandal, it was hard not to root for the current Nittany Lions players to finally get a win after so many obstacles. Penn State busted out with an easy, feel-good 34-7 win over Navy. The Midshipmen are hard to root against as well, but this one time was OK.

Game of the week: You might have missed it, because it ended late and was on at the same time as much bigger games. And, OK, it was Indiana. But the Hoosiers' game against Ball State was the most exciting Big Ten contest of the weekend. The teams traded touchdowns in the first half, with Ball State leading 25-24 at the break. Indiana looked done when it trailed 38-25 late in the fourth quarter and starting quarterback Cameron Coffman went out with a hip pointer. But freshman Nate Sudfeld threw a 70-yard touchdown pass and then led the team on another scoring drive with 49 seconds left. Ah, but the Hoosiers made the PlayStation mistake of scoring too fast. Ball State completed a controversial, hard-to-believe pass to the IU 25 with one second left, and Steven Schott booted the game-winner as time expired. It was a tough, tough loss for Kevin Wilson's team, but a fun game to watch.

[+] EnlargeBraxton Miller
Greg Bartram/US PresswireBuckeyes quarterback Braxton Miller tries to evade California linebacker Nathan Broussard on Saturday.
Biggest play: If it's late in a close game, the last thing a defense wants to see is Braxton Miller scrambling. The Ohio State quarterback burned Wisconsin with a long touchdown throw after things broke down last year, and he did so against Cal on Saturday with a 72-yard strike to an unbelievably open Devin Smith for the game with 3:26 left. Safeties have to respect Miller's explosive running ability, but they get can burned when they leave their receivers. That's why the Miller scramble is becoming one of the most dangerous late-game plays to defend.

Best call: Wisconsin was supposed to be in punt safe mode in the third quarter against Utah State, and its returners would usually call for a fair catch in the situation Kenzel Doe found himself in. But Doe, who was only returning punts because Jared Abbrederis was injured, saw a small opening on the sideline and decided to go for it. He was in the end zone 82 yards later, finally giving the Badgers the spark they needed to eventually beat the Aggies 16-14. Doe? More like Woo-Hoo!

Big Men on Campus (Offense): How about some love for the backups this week? Minnesota's Max Shortell stepped in for the injured MarQueis Gray and threw for 188 yards and three touchdowns, helping the Gophers fend off Western Michigan for a 3-0 start. And as Iowa's running back curse reached new, ludicrous heights, walk-on Mark Weisman came out of nowhere to run for 113 yards and three touchdowns as part of the Hawkeyes' much-needed win over Northern Iowa.

Big Man on Campus (Defense): Minnesota cornerback Michael Carter had an 18-yard interception return to set up a touchdown early. He also broke up Western Michigan quarterback Alex Carder's pass late to help preserve the 28-23 victory.

Big Man on Campus (Special teams): It's hard to run 99 offensive plays before scoring your first touchdown, but that's what Northwestern did against Boston College. Luckily, they had kicker Jeff Budzien, who made all five of his field goal attempts to give the Wildcats all the points they'd need in a 22-13 victory.

Worst hangover: Michigan State, by a mile. The Spartans were carrying the banner for the Big Ten for one week before they tripped, broke the pole and set the flag on fire against Notre Dame. Although Michigan State bounced back from a bad loss to the Irish last year, Saturday's offensive showing was so inept that it makes you wonder if this team can overcome those limitations going forward. Just a bad, bad performance on a national stage.

Strangest moment: Playing UMass is good for your offense, and just about everyone got involved in Michigan's 63-13 win. That included left tackle Taylor Lewan, who got to live out an offensive lineman's dream by recovering a Denard Robinson fumble for a touchdown. Or did he? At least one teammate claimed that center Elliott Mealer actually recovered the ball. And Robinson said Lewan was mad about his score because the play broke down and he didn't get to complete his block. But the box score says it was a Lewan touchdown, and that's something we probably won't see again.
Five lessons from the week that was in Big Ten football.

[+] EnlargeRussell Wilson
Andrew Weber/US PresswireWisconsin's bid for a national championship, along with Russell Wilson's Heisman hopes, were all dashed in the Badgers' loss to Michigan State.
1. The Big Ten isn't coming to the BCS title party -- again: No Big Ten team has won a national title since Ohio State upset Miami in 2002. The league hasn't participated in the BCS title game since 2007. That drought will continue. Wisconsin was the league's best championship hope as its last undefeated team heading into Week 8, but the Badgers lost to Michigan State 37-31 in a thriller. It was the type of loss -- complete with a Hail Mary ending -- some teams can overcome and still get back to the top, and Wisconsin could still avenge the defeat in a Big Ten title game rematch. But the reality is that the Badgers were only No. 6 in the first BCS standings anyway, and they've got too much competition nationally to make it to New Orleans for the title game. Michigan State fans can think about what might have been if the Spartans hadn't lost to Notre Dame earlier this season. But for 2011 -- again -- the Rose Bowl will be the ceiling for the Big Ten. (Oh, and the league isn't bringing home a Heisman Trophy, either, as Russell Wilson's candidacy sleeps with the fishes).

2. Michigan State-Nebraska is extra important: Michigan State has some serious mojo going after beating Ohio State, Michigan and Wisconsin in three consecutive games. The Spartans' tests aren't over, as they'll have to find a way to win a fourth-straight, high-stakes showdown in Week 9 at Nebraska. This one is arguably even more important than the Wisconsin game because it's a division matchup. If the Spartans can prevail in Lincoln, they will be the overwhelming favorites to win the Legends Division, since their remaining games (Minnesota, at Iowa, Indiana, at Northwestern) look very manageable. On the flip side, the Cornhuskers will gain the inside edge on the division crown if they can derail Michigan State's momentum.

3. Wisconsin isn't guaranteed to get to Indy: Sounds weird to say, because the Badgers were so dominant in the first half of the season that everyone penciled them into the Dec. 3 league championship game. But right now, Wisconsin doesn't even lead the Leaders. Your new first place team in that division is Penn State, which remains undefeated in conference play and is 7-1 overall after Saturday's win at Northwestern. Many people still doubt the Nittany Lions, but they keep on winning. The long-dormant offense is showing signs of life, with the offensive line getting more physical and Silas Redd putting together four consecutive games of at least 125 rushing yards. The Nittany Lions' schedule is tough the next four weeks, and they'll have to find a way to beat Wisconsin in the season finale at Madison. But now it's the Badgers who are playing catch up. Heck, even Ohio State isn't out of the picture yet. If the Buckeyes win out and get another loss from Penn State, they can make it to Indy.

4. Boilers, Illini headed in opposite directions: A Purdue team seemingly headed toward another bowl-less season showed life last week against Penn State and then took a big step Saturday by beating No. 23 Illinois. The Boilers have discovered their quarterback in Caleb TerBush, who leads an innovative offense, and their defense pressured Illinois all day. While the schedule gets much tougher in the coming weeks, Purdue shouldn't be overlooked. Two more wins and the Boilers should go bowling for the first time since 2007. Illinois, meanwhile, is backsliding after its best start since 1951. The Nathan Scheelhaase-led offense has produced just 21 points in the past two weeks, and things don't get much easier next week at Penn State. Could Illinois be headed for a second-half collapse? Stay tuned.

5. Some quarterback clarity emerges: About half the league has been juggling quarterbacks this season, but the position appeared to come into focus in Week 8. Matt McGloin finally got a start for Penn State after outplaying Rob Bolden for several weeks, and McGloin went the distance in the Lions' 34-24 win at Northwestern. It's hard to see how Joe Paterno goes back to Bolden as his starter now. Purdue also stuck with one guy, playing TerBush all the way against Illinois instead of splitting his reps with Robert Marve. TerBush led the Boilermakers to the 21-14 win and was very efficient. Indiana used its third different starting quarterback of the season while turning to true freshman Tre Roberson. While the Hoosiers lost again, Roberson showed promise and an ability to move the team on long drives with his arm and legs. Minnesota also played MarQueis Gray exclusively against Nebraska instead of trying Max Shortell, though the Gophers have far more problems than who's under center. Perhaps the quarterback questions at all three places will stop -- at least until the next bad performance.

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