Morning stripes: Short-term memory

September, 12, 2013
9/12/13
8:00
AM ET
Good morning, everyone. Guess what day it is?

It isn't Sunday, and it isn't quite yet Monday, so make sure you don't ask Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Terence Newman to look back to his previous game to dissect what went wrong in it. Why? Well, since today is Thursday he simply can't remember quite that far back. If he tries to recall the events of last weekend in Chicago, all he sees is fog.

"What happened this past week?" he'll reply on a Wednesday if you ask him about what happened the previous Sunday.

After a few other leading questions, Newman will finally admit why he doesn't recall the events of three, four or five days ago: "I don't know what you're talking about. ... I'm a DB, I have short-term memory."

Indeed, now that the Bengals are fully into Week 2 mode and preparing for their next opponent, the events of Week 1 are completely behind them. So, in that respect, let's move our own minds forward and focus on what's on the horizon for Cincinnati on Monday night:
  • Today's morning stripes kicks off with this notebook from Bengals.com's Geoff Hobson. It begins with Newman's short-term memory mantra and his explanation for why the stakes are a little bit higher and the stage is a little bit brighter for this particular "Monday Night Football" game. A former Dallas Cowboys defensive back, Newman played his share of Monday night games that featured the Cowboys and Eagles or the Cowboys and Redskins. There's nothing quite like playing a divisional opponent in prime time, he said. Also within that notebook are quotes from Pittsburgh coach Mike Tomlin on his former linebacker, James Harrison. The intimidating Bengals player whom Newman calls a "little tank" will be facing his old team for the first time.
  • Sticking with Bengals.com, Hobson has a story on how the players involved may change over the years, but the Pittsburgh-Cincinnati rivalry has, for the most part, stayed the same. One reason the Steelers have been so physical and dominating on defense in recent years is because of their defensive coordinator, Hobson writes. With Dick LeBeau at the helm, Cincinnati knows it has to be prepared for a battle. Last year's game at Heinz Field didn't even have a touchdown. Recently, those types of ballgames have been more common than blowouts and shootouts. More of the same could be in store Monday night, particularly with a Bengals defense that's out to prove it can rush the passer after not getting a sack all last game. (Or maybe it isn't out to prove anything based off last week. I already forgot: short-term memory loss)
  • On offense for Cincinnati, left tackle Andrew Whitworth told reporters Wednesday that he actually had a second procedure performed on his injured knee after he reinjured it early in training camp. The Cincinnati Enquirer's Joe Reedy outlines the procedure and how it led a once-healthy Whitworth to suddenly being sidelined. We also looked at Whitworth's injury on the ESPN NFL Nation blog and outlined why Cincinnati will be OK, even if the Pro Bowl tackle has to miss his second straight game this weekend.
  • Per Reedy, as well as the guys at CincyJungle.com, we learned late Wednesday night that former Bengals Pro Bowl right tackle Willie Anderson was among those listed for first-year eligibility in next year's Pro Football Hall of Fame class. The class won't be announced until next spring.
  • We referenced Tomlin's comments on Harrison a little earlier in today's stripes, but if you want to hear for yourself exactly what the coach told reporters about the "social" Harrison, as well as his own thoughts on HBO's "Hard Knocks," take a listen to the audio provided by the Dayton Daily News' Jay Morrison. Tomlin's conference call certainly was as funny online as it was in person.

Now, after reading all of that, do you remember anything?

Coley Harvey

ESPN Cincinnati Bengals reporter

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