Tournament Challenge: Day 1 in the books

March, 21, 2014
Mar 21
2:15
AM ET


There were just 18,741 out of the 11 million-plus ESPN Tournament Challenge brackets (or .17 percent) to get all 16 games correct on Thursday. An additional 178,258 got 15 of 16 correct. On the other end of the spectrum, 12 brackets got no games correct and 126 got just one correct.

The day was marked by four overtime games, some near-upsets, and actual upsets from 11-seed Dayton and 12-seeds Harvard and North Dakota State. Here are some notable numbers on each of the upsets.

11-seed Dayton over 6-seed Ohio State
  • Dayton was picked in 19.7 percent of brackets; 3.9 percent of brackets have the Flyers in the Sweet 16.
  • 25.4 percent of brackets had Ohio State in the Sweet 16; 2.3 percent had the Buckeyes in the Final Four.
12-seed Harvard over 5-seed Cincinnati
  • Harvard was picked in 31.4 percent of brackets; 2.7 percent of brackets have the Crimson in the Sweet 16.
  • 11.2 percent had Cincinnati in Sweet 16; 1.6 percent in Final Four.
12-seed North Dakota State over 5-seed Oklahoma
  • North Dakota State picked in 23.6 percent of brackets; 5.7 percent of brackets have the Bison in the Sweet 16.
  • 33.7 percent had Oklahoma in the Sweet 16; 1.6 in Final Four.

Brackets picking both Harvard and North Dakota State to win: 11.2 percent
Brackets picking Dayton, Harvard and North Dakota State to win: 4 percent

President Obama's bracket
The president went 14-2 on Thursday, hitting both 12-seeds in Harvard and North Dakota State, but missing on Dayton and Texas. He lost a Sweet 16 team when Ohio State lost to Dayton in the first game Thursday, but his two teams set to face off in the national finals, Michigan State and Louisville, both won on Thursday. His bracket is in the 98.2 percentile.

Looking ahead to Friday, Obama picked just one lower seed to win, No. 9 Oklahoma State, which was taken by the majority of Tournament Challenge brackets.

Chalk bracket
If you picked all the higher seeds Thursday, you would've gone 12-4 and be in the 67.7 percentile.

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