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Monday, July 19, 2010
Tim Abromaitis had an epic Friday night

By Eamonn Brennan

I saw a movie on Friday night. It was fun. It was considerably less fun -- and ultimately less risky -- then what Notre Dame standout Tim Abromaitis and incoming freshman Eric Atkins were doing in South Bend, Ind.

What were Abromaitis and Atkins doing? Partying. And maybe not doing so in the most responsible manner ever. From the Associated Press:
The son of former Notre Dame standout Joe Montana was among 11 Fighting Irish athletes arrested on misdemeanor charges of underage drinking at a party Friday night. A total of 44 people were arrested after city police responded to a call about a fight near a roadway and discovered the party, said St. Joseph County Police assistant chief Bill Redman. Two non-athletes face a misdemeanor charge of providing alcohol to minors. The arrests were handled by state excise police.

Eleven athletes is a pretty high arrest hit-rate for a college party, even in South Bend, where parties often seem flooded with large, athlete-looking types. (Few schools have Notre Dame's reverence for athletes and a student body small enough to know everyone by their first name; the combination leads to some pretty interesting invite lists.) This probably goes double for the summer, when athletes are among the few students on campus. This party had to be filled with gigantic people, many of whom were ducking their heads in a smallish college house. You can just picture it.

That said, Abromaitis and Atkins weren't doing anything that most college students don't do all the time. If you get caught drinking underage in college, you usually get a ticket and some sort of deferred punishment, which allows cops to punish students without affecting their permanent records in serious ways. Hopefully, some equivalent happens with Abromaitis and Atkins, and neither player has to suffer too much for a rather mundane collegiate Friday. A few extra windsprints and a stern warning not to let it happen again should suffice.