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Friday, April 22, 2011
Jim Calhoun could lose NCAA title bonus

By Diamond Leung

Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun could lose a lucrative bonus for winning the national championship if the team's NCAA Academic Progress Rate score doesn't meet standards.

From the New Haven Register:
UConn should learn in a few weeks whether it meets APR standards, but it’s a virtual certainty that the program will fall short of the standard score of 925.

That means Calhoun could suffer a double-whammy: Not only could his bonus be kept from him, but per his contract, he must also donate $100,000 to UConn’s general scholarship fund if the men’s hoops program fails to meet APR standards. Calhoun’s total loss would be $187,500.

Calhoun was not available for comment Thursday.

The Huskies would also lose at least one, and most likely two scholarships for next season (on top of the scholarship they’ve already been docked by the NCAA committee on infractions).

According to the new five-year contract Calhoun signed in May, winning the national championship was a bonus of three months of his base salary, which was $350,000 this season. The contract also states, "These payments will only be made if the NCAA Academic Progress Report ("APR") standard for the men's basketball team has been met for both the most recently completed academic year and the last reported four-year rolling average."

The New Haven Register also notes that the Nate Miles situation once again could come back to haunt Calhoun because of the APR hit.
For the 2008-09 season, for instance, the Huskies had an APR of 844, but a four-year average of 930 -- barely above the 925 standard, but enough to avoid penalties.

What will hurt the Huskies this time around is the amount of players who left the program ineligible, and not on track to earn their degree. Once again, the program will get burned by Nate Miles, who was expelled from the school in fall 2008. His departure has counted against UConn’s APR score for the last two academic years, and will continue to do so for the next two.