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Friday, January 11, 2013
3-point shot: Franklin worth a second look

By Andy Katz

1. San Diego State coach Steve Fisher watched the Fresno State game on the bus ride home late Wednesday night and kept rewinding Jamaal Franklin's Dominique Wilkins-esque dunk over and over and over again. Franklin threw the ball off the backboard, caught his own rebound and flushed. “He’s a very, very aggressive player. He’s not afraid to take chances. He helps us be productive and it turned out to be a pretty spectacular play.’’ Franklin scored 20 points and grabbed 18 rebounds in the three-point MWC opening win. Meanwhile, Fisher is concerned about the injury to Xavier Thames, who sat out the Fresno State game with a back injury. Fisher started Winston Shepard in his place and he had seven assists and two turnovers. Meanwhile, forward JJ O'Brien took a tumble and was limited to 17 minutes. Fisher said he’s not sure about O’Brien’s availability either for Saturday’s game against Colorado State.

2. Boise State coach Leon Rice is in no rush to reinstate the four suspended players -- leading scorer Derrick Marks and reserves Michael Thompson, Kenny Buckner and Darrious Hamilton -- after the Broncos beat Wyoming on the road Wednesday night in Laramie. The Broncos don’t play again until Wednesday at home against New Mexico. Rice is letting the four practice. He said the suspension had nothing to do with drugs or violence, but he will not compromise on character decisions. Good for him.

3. The latest officiating controversy came during the Kentucky-Vanderbilt game when a shot-clock violation was missed by the officiating crew. The bucket scored by Nerlens Noel to give the Wildcats a 60-55 lead ended up being the difference in a 60-58 final. A shot-clock violation can’t be reviewed, despite the plea by Vanderbilt’s Kevin Stallings. This is yet another rule change that must be reviewed in the offseason. These kinds of calls need to be corrected. It may slow up the game but coaches, players and fans would rather the calls be right than clearly wrong when everyone but the officials has access to review the video.