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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. -- Alabama coach Nick Saban would not apologize for signing Jonathan Taylor, but he did say Monday that he was "very, very sorry for the way this worked out."

Saban, athletic director Bill Battle and the Alabama administration gave Taylor what they called a "second chance" in January, a year after he was dismissed by Georgia following an arrest for felony aggravated assault and family violence. On Saturday night, the 6-foot-4, 335-pound defensive lineman was arrested again on a domestic violence charge. He was dismissed the following day.

"I'm not sorry for giving him an opportunity. I'm sorry for the way things worked out," Saban told reporters in Tuscaloosa. "I'm not apologizing for the opportunity that we gave him. I wanted to try to help the guy make it work. It didn't work. So we're sorry that it didn't work and we're sorry there was an incident and we're sorry for the people that were involved in the incident. But we're not apologizing for what we did and we're going to continue to create opportunities for people in the future and we'll very, very closely evaluate anyone's character that we allow in the program."

Taylor, 21, is charged with domestic violence third-degree assault and domestic violence third-degree criminal mischief in Tuscaloosa.

According to an incident report, Tuscaloosa Police Department officers responded to a call near the Alabama campus to speak with a woman who told police she was assaulted by her boyfriend. The 24-year-old victim had "minor injuries to her neck from the assault." Officers also noticed a bedroom door that had a "hole punched in it."

Taylor, who spent a year at a junior college before enrolling at Alabama, still faces a trial in Athens, Georgia, on two felony counts of aggravated assault. Three months before that alleged altercation with his girlfriend, he was one of four Georgia players arrested on misdemeanor charges of theft by deception for allegedly double-cashing meal-reimbursement checks from the athletic department.

Saban, who said "it's not always going to work out" giving players second chances, argued in favor of his decision to sign Taylor. At times defensive, he tried to emphasize the success stories he's had with troubled athletes and turn the attention to the other players on the roster who have not run afoul of the law.

"He did everything we asked him to do here," Saban said of Taylor. "He had a lot of psychological profiling, a lot of psychological counseling. He never missed a session. He did everything he was supposed to do. We're sorry there was an incident. We levied the consequences. I think that's all there is to talk about when it comes to that. We have 125 other players on our team that are doing really well. There's really nothing else to talk about. Jonathan Taylor came here, we gave him an opportunity, it didn't work out, he failed, we're sorry, it's time to move on."

Battle said in a statement that "Violent conduct by any representative of the University of Alabama athletics department will not be tolerated."

"I believe in second chances. I still do," he wrote Sunday. "However, being successful in that second chance requires responsibility and accountability. In Jonathan's situation, the University and the Department of Athletics set forth very clear standards of accountability and expectations of conduct. Jonathan was afforded a chance to successfully overcome the difficulties that resulted in his departure from the University of Georgia. Unfortunately, it appears that he was unable to do so, in spite of extensive efforts to assist him."

Saban said that in spite of what's happened with Taylor, he still hopes he can help him in the future.

"I still think he's a good person," he said. "I think he has a problem and a circumstance and a situation that is not acceptable, and that is his problem. And he has been certainly dealt with relative to this problem."

As far as the punishment facing defensive back Geno Smith


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Jonathan Taylor dismissed by Bama

March, 29, 2015
Mar 29
2:11
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Alabama Crimson Tide defensive lineman Jonathan Taylor has been dismissed from the team after he was arrested again on domestic violence charges in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

"This will still need to go through the legal process, but when he was given an opportunity here, it was under strict guidelines and we made it clear there was a zero-tolerance policy," coach Nick Saban said in a statement.

The 6-foot-4, 335-pound Taylor was arrested Saturday night and charged with domestic violence third-degree assault and domestic violence third-degree criminal mischief, according to the Tuscaloosa Police Department.

According to an incident report, police officers responded to a call near Alabama's campus to speak with a woman who told police she was assaulted by her boyfriend at approximately 6 p.m. Saturday.

After speaking to the woman about an altercation that took place at her residence, officers located the suspect at the residence and spoke to him about the incident. Officers found probable cause to arrest the suspect.

The 24-year-old woman had minor injuries to her neck from the assault, according to the police report. The officer also noted in the report damage to a bedroom closet door with a hole punched in it.

Taylor was held on $1,000 bond and placed on a mandatory 12-hour domestic violence hold.

"Representing this University is a privilege that none of us can take for granted," Alabama athletic director Bill Battle said in a statement. "As I noted in my comments when the decision was made to allow Jonathan Taylor to attend the University on a football scholarship, I believe in second chances. I still do.

"However, being successful in that second chance requires responsibility and accountability. In Jonathan's situation, the University and the Department of Athletics set forth very clear standards of accountability and expectations of conduct. Jonathan was afforded a chance to successfully overcome the difficulties that resulted in his departure from the University of Georgia. Unfortunately, it appears that he was unable to do so, in spite of extensive efforts to assist him."

University spokeswoman Deborah Lane said Sunday that Taylor has been referred to judicial affairs.

Saban and Battle both said Taylor warranted a second chance when he signed in January as part of the Crimson Tide's 2015 class. On signing day, Saban called it a "university decision" and said it was determined "that he was the kind of guy that deserved a second chance."

Taylor had been kicked off the Georgia Bulldogs


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Bama's risky decision backfires

March, 29, 2015
Mar 29
12:43
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When defensive lineman Jonathan Taylor enrolled at Alabama in January, Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban said he was the "kind of guy that deserved a second chance."

Alabama athletic director Bill Battle said: "Our coaches and I feel he is worthy of a second chance at completing his college football career."

After Taylor was arrested on domestic violence charges Saturday night, Alabama now has egg on its face.

When Taylor was admitted to Alabama, Saban, Battle and the university's administration were fully aware that he was a two-time loser at Georgia before Bulldogs coach Mark Richt kicked him off the team. Taylor was arrested twice in five months last year for allegedly double-cashing meal-reimbursement checks from the UGA athletic department, and then, worse, allegedly choking and striking his girlfriend with a closed fist during an altercation in his dorm room.

Now, Taylor is a three-time loser. He was arrested in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, on Saturday night on charges of domestic violence third-degree assault and domestic violence third-degree criminal mischief following an altercation with his girlfriend. According to Tuscaloosa police, Taylor's 24-year-old girlfriend had minor injuries to her neck. Police also found a bedroom closet door with a hole punched in it.


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[+] EnlargeJonathan Taylor
Cliff Welch/Icon SMI Jonathan Taylor was being held on $1,000 bond and was placed on a mandatory 12-hour domestic violence hold.

Alabama defensive lineman Jonathan Taylor, who was dismissed from the Georgia football team last year after being arrested on a charge of felony aggravated assault and family violence, has been arrested again on domestic violence charges in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

The 6-foot-4, 335-pound Taylor was arrested Saturday night and charged with domestic violence third-degree assault and domestic violence third-degree criminal mischief, according to the Tuscaloosa Police Department.

According to an incident report, police officers responded to a call near Alabama's campus to speak with a woman who told police she was assaulted by her boyfriend at approximately 6 p.m. on Saturday.

After speaking to the accuser about an altercation that took place at her residence, officers located the suspect at the the residence and spoke to him about the incident. Officers found probable cause to arrest the suspect.

The 24-year-old accuser had minor injuries to her neck from the assault, according to the police report. The officer also noted in the report damage to a bedroom closet door with a hole punched in it.


(Read full post)



NEW ORLEANS -- At 6-foot-7 and 314 pounds, Alabama defensive tackle commitment Raekwon Davis towered over the competition at Saturday's Opening Regional at Joe Brown Park in New Orleans. He also loomed large over his peers with his play.

Davis, who is from Meridian (Mississippi) High School and ranks as the nation's No. 243 player, earned an invitation to The Opening finals, which will be held from July 5-10 at Nike World Headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon. Davis took a little while to get going during drills, but by the time the one-on-ones arrived, he performed admirably, winning repetitions at defensive tackle, defensive end and even offensive tackle.

Best of the SEC: Front seven

March, 27, 2015
Mar 27
11:10
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OK, so we've gone over the fun and flashy offensive skill guys who put folks in the seats, and we've talked about the big uglies who protect those valuable commodities. Now, it's time to talk about the guys up front on the other side who want to make their offensive counterparts miserable.

As we continue to look at the best players in the SEC at different positions, we're checking out the SEC's best front-seven members. This league has always hung its hat on great defensive line play, and this season shouldn't be any different. And those linebackers ain't so bad either.

Here are the top players in the front seven in alphabetical order:

Defensive line

Derek Barnett, DE, Tennessee, So.

Tennessee had no problem playing a lot of freshmen last season, and it's a good thing the coaches decided to put Barnett on the field. The 6-foot-3, 268-pound punishing pass-rusher dominated up front for most of the 2014 season, finishing the year tied for fourth in the SEC in sacks (11) and second in tackles for loss (20.5). He set record-breaking numbers for a freshman at Tennessee, and the scary thing is he'll be older and wiser in 2015.

[+] EnlargeGarrett
Soobum Im/USA TODAY SportsTexas A&M's Myles Garrett posted 11.5 sacks as a freshman, but only three of them came in SEC play.

Myles Garrett, DE, Texas A&M, So.

Another fabulous freshman, Garrett led the Aggies in sacks (11.5) and tackles for loss (14). He also had 53 tackles and 10 quarterback hurries. However, there is a bit of a knock on Garrett and that's the fact he only had three sacks in conference play. That's a legitimate gripe, but if you go back and watch tape, Garrett missed a handful of sacks in SEC play. It's not like he took plays off. He was still a valuable force off the edge for A&M, but he didn't always finish what he started. Expect that to change from the physical freak.

Robert Nkemdiche, DT, Ole Miss, Jr.

Defensive tackle isn't a glamorous position, but it is very important for any defense to be successful. Nkemdiche didn't have flashy stats last season (he only had two sacks and four tackles for loss), but it was tough to find a more disruptive interior lineman in 2014. The ultra athletic Nkemdiche flew around opposing backfields and directed a lot of plays to others. That's what makes him so special. He might not make the play, but he'll make sure someone does by forcing the offense to change direction, and he collapses the pocket with ease.

A'Shawn Robinson, DL, Alabama, Jr.

The future NFL defensive lineman can play both nose guard and defensive end in Alabama's 3-4 defensive scheme. He's another guy who didn't wow you with his stats last season, but he was incredibly disruptive up front. He only had 6.5 tackles for loss last season, but had 49 tackles and really started to kick things into gear during the final stretch of the season. Robinson's ability to play multiple positions up front makes him that much more valuable for Alabama.

Linebacker

Kentrell Brothers, Missouri, RSr.

Brothers led Missouri and ranked second in the SEC in total tackles (122) last season, averaging 8.7 tackles per game. He also tied for second in the league with 64 solo stops. The Will linebacker was even better in conference play, averaging 9.8 tackles per game. Brothers also had eight or more tackles in eight games last year and hit double-digit tackle numbers in six of those games. Brothers makes sure he's in or around every play, as he's totaled nearly 200 tackles in the past two seasons combined.

Carl Lawson, LB/DE, Auburn, RSo.

He might have missed all of the 2014 season with an ACL injury, but Lawson has a chance to be a very special player in Auburn's new Will Muschamp-coached defense. Especially when you think about him playing that hybrid linebacker/defensive end position that Muschamp covets. As a freshman, Lawson registered 7.5 tackles for loss and four sacks. Lawson, who was the nation's No. 2 defensive end coming out of high school in 2013, has to be excited after watching film of Muschamp's last hybrid star Dante Fowler Jr., who had 8.5 sacks and 15 tackles for loss at Florida last season.

Reggie Ragland, Alabama, Sr.

The All-SEC selection could have dipped out early for the NFL, but decided to come back to Tuscaloosa, which is great news for the Crimson Tide. Ragland made a ton of plays all over the field for the Tide last season, ranking second on the team with 95 tackles. Forty-five of his tackles were solo, and he also had 10.5 tackles for loss. Ragland is the kind of linebacker who really challenges the offense to direct plays away from him, and he can cover so much ground with his speed and athleticism.

More to watch

Brice Ramsey is generally perceived as the frontrunner to replace Hutson Mason as Georgia’s starting quarterback, but the battle between Ramsey, Faton Bauta and Jacob Park is only beginning.

Park, a redshirt freshman who stood out on the Bulldogs’ scout team last season, certainly has the skills -- and the competitive swagger -- to change things.

“It’s just fun to be part of a competition,” Park told reporters this week. “If me and you are in a foot race and I win, that’s fun, ‘cause I won.”

And if he lost? “Hey, next question.”

Check out what Park had to say here in a Q&A posted by Atlanta Journal-Constitution beat writer Chip Towers.

Don't think that Brice Ramsey will just be handed the keys to new offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer's offense. Oh, no. Despite having the most extensive experience (333 passing yards and three touchdowns last year) of the rest of the quarterbacks competing -- Jacob Park and Faton Bauta -- Ramsey will have to earn the starting spot just like the rest of them. It's a full-fledged quarterback battle at Georgia, and the redshirt sophomore has to take advantage of every rep he takes ... just like the other two.

"I have playing experience, but it means nothing now,” Ramsey said earlier this week. “I’m back to square one. Just trying to work hard and do everything I can."

You can read more about Georgia's three-headed quarterback battle at the Athens-Banner Herald.

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California, Florida and Texas are largely considered the "Big Three" in college football recruiting. But national recruiting analyst Gerry Hamilton joins ESPN's Phil Murphy to explain why Georgia deserves to be in the top tier and has numbers to prove it.

It's no secret that the most popular narrative when describing what makes the SEC tick in recent years has revolved around defense. It wins championships and it's something the SEC has been really, really good at for a number of years, especially during the conference's string of seven straight BCS national championships.

But like most things in this universe, football is evolving. Defense is great, but offense is greater, and slowly, the SEC is having to adapt and become a more offensive-friendly league. In the last two years, the league has had at least eight teams average more than 400 yards per game. From 2008 to 2012, the SEC never had more than six teams reach 400 yards per game in a single season.

This year, the league has a pretty impressive list of skill-position players to keep an eye on. We're taking a look at the top players a few positions around the league, and Wednesday we're starting with offensive skill players, listing the top players at running back, wide receiver/tight end, and we're looking at the top all-purpose player heading into the thee 2015 season.

Here's our list of the top skill players in the SEC:

Running back

[+] EnlargeNick Chubb
Dale Zanine/USA TODAY SportsNick Chubb didn't just fill in when Todd Gurley couldn't go he emerged as a first-team All-SEC pick after rushing for 1,547 yards.

Nick Chubb, So., Georgia

Chubb was outstanding as a true freshman last year, as he had to fill in for star running back Todd Gurley during Gurley's midseason suspension and his eventual season-ending knee injury. All Chubb, who stands a chiseled 5-foot-10, 228 pounds and renders arm tackles futile, did was rank second in the SEC with 1,547 rushing yards and tie for first with 14 rushing touchdowns. What's more impressive is that Chubb started just eight games -- all 100-yard performances -- and the All-SEC first-teamer saved the best for last. He registered a career-high, school bowl-record and SEC bowl-record 266 yards on 33 carries vs. Louisville in the Belk Bowl, the second-best total in a game in school history.

Leonard Fournette, So., LSU

Fournette was supposed to make an immediate, Michael Jordan-like impact for the Tigers last season, but needed some time to feel out the college game. In a why-haven't-you-won-the-Heisman-Trophy-now college football society, Fournette was viewed by some as a bust, despite being fresh out of high school. Still, a late-season surge and his menacing physique put Fournette firmly in this position. After shedding some weight and increasing his speed this offseason, there's no doubt the sophomore-to-be will shoot past his 1,034 rushing yards and 10 touchdowns from last year. Fournette averaged 98 yards in his final five games and blossomed into a fine player who should really take off in 2015.

Wide Receiver/Tight end

Pharoh Cooper, Jr., South Carolina

The Gamecocks didn't have a lot to smile about last season, but the offense set a handful of records last season. One reason for that was because of the play of Cooper, who finished the 2014 season third in the SEC in receptions (69), second in receiving yards (1,136) and receiving yards per game (87.4), fourth in receptions per game (5.3), and ninth in all-purpose yards per game (108.5). He also led the team in all receiving categories and was fourth with 200 yards rushing. He's the SEC's top returning statistical receiver, and while he registered only three 100-yard games, Cooper will be the go-to receiving threat for the Gamecocks yet again this fall.

D'haquille "Duke" Williams, Sr., Auburn

It's hard to find a more physically gifted receiver in the SEC. Williams had every chance to leave Auburn early for he NFL, but he decided to come back and really enhance his skill. Williams led the team with 45 receptions and had 730 yards and five touchdowns. Those numbers don't impress you? Well, consider the fact he missed two games because of a knee injury and was suspended for the bowl game. Yes, we're dealing in hypotheticals, but hypothetically speaking, Williams likely would have come close to or topped the 1,000-yard mark.

Evan Engram, Jr., Ole Miss

If you're looking for a Jimmy Graham-type tight end, look no further than Engram. He wasn't just the SEC's best tight end last year, he returns in 2015 as arguably the nation's best tight end. He wasn't overly praised when that historic 2013 class made it to Oxford, but plenty of eyes are all over him after a breakout sophomore year in which he led all SEC tight ends with 38 catches and 662 yards. Engram is a total mismatch because he's too big for most corners to handle and too fast for linebackers and safeties to consistently contain.

[+] EnlargeLaquon Treadwell
Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)Laquon Treadwell is being held out of contact in the spring but is expected to be ready to go in the fall.

Laquon Treadwell, Jr., Ole Miss

He's another player who should have had better numbers in 2014 but had his season was cut short. The physically imposing specimen was a star as a freshman and was on his way to first-team All-SEC honors before suffering a horrific leg injury on Nov. 1. Treadwell's season ended with him catching 48 passes for 632 yards and five touchdowns. Despite playing in four less games than he did in 2013, Treadwell registered more yards on nearly 30 fewer catches. Treadwell isn't going through contact this spring, but he should be healthy come the fall. Oh, and then there's this from last month: Yikes!

All-purpose

Speedy Noil, So., Texas A&M

Noil arrived in College Station with a ton of hype attached to his name, and he did a good job of living up to it. Noil led all SEC true freshmen in receptions (46), receiving yards (583) and receiving touchdowns (five). Noil led the Aggies in all-purpose yards (1,418), punt return yards (180) and kickoff return yards (645) despite missing the SMU game due to injury.

More to watch:

SEC morning links

March, 25, 2015
Mar 25
9:00
AM ET

It's OK everyone, the NCAA tournament will continue in a few days and "Empire" will return soon enough!

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National recruiting analyst Gerry Hamilton joins ESPN's Phil Murphy to discuss top performers from the Nike's The Opening regional camp in Atlanta.

Attrition hit the SEC hard this offseason, for some more than others, but every school has a player moving on that left a mark, a player that can't easily be replaced. So we asked the question, which player will be missed most on every SEC team? And more importantly, how does that team plan to fill the void left behind?

First up in the two-part series is a look at the SEC East.

Florida: DE Dante Fowler Jr.

New defensive coordinator Geoff Collins will have his hands full trying to replace Fowler. The All-SEC star led the Gators last year in tackles for loss (15) and sacks (8.5), and it's going to take more than one player to replace that type of production. As Florida moves to a more traditional 4-3 scheme under Collins, defensive ends Alex McCalister and Bryan Cox Jr. will be responsible for getting to the quarterback. The two combined for 10 sacks last season. Five-star CeCe Jefferson is another name to watch, but he won't arrive on campus until the summer.

[+] EnlargeAlvin Dupree
AP Photo/Wade PayneHow will Kentucky fill the void at defensive end with Alvin "Bud" Dupree out of the mix in 2015?

Georgia: C David Andrews

Don't get me wrong. Running back Todd Gurley will be missed. But Georgia has Nick Chubb, one of the nation's top rushers, coming back and that should help ease the pain of losing Gurley. But losing Andrews hurts. He played in 50 games during his UGA career and started every game the past three seasons. It will look a little different with somebody else snapping the ball, but Mark Richt has already tabbed Hunter Long and Isaiah Wynn as the two main contenders to win the job this spring. Long has the experience, but Wynn has more upside. Take your pick.

Kentucky: DE/LB Alvin "Bud" Dupree

There wasn't a better ambassador for Kentucky football over the past couple years than Dupree. And to think, he never even got to play in a bowl game. Now he's taking his game to the next level, and it's up to former ESPN 300 recruit Jason Hatcher to fill the void. Hatcher played some last season, finishing fourth on the team with 5.5 tackles for loss, but how will he fare as an every-down player? The Wildcats need him to be the elite pass-rusher they recruited out of high school if they want to take that next step and reach a bowl game.

Missouri: DE Shane Ray

Really, this could go to Ray or teammate Markus Golden. They formed the top defensive end duo in the SEC last season and played a major role in getting Missouri back to the SEC title game. With both moving on, who's next in line at D-Line Zou? Redshirt freshmen Marcus Loud and Charles Harris are the two most viable candidates, as the coaches are high on both, but junior-to-be Rickey Hatley will also be in the mix as will five-star recruit Terry Beckner Jr. when he enrolls this summer. Though at 6-foot-4, 298 pounds, Beckner is better suited to play inside.

South Carolina: QB Dylan Thompson

It was a disappointing season for South Carolina, but Thompson, in his first full year as the starter, led the SEC in passing with 3,564 yards. Coach Steve Spurrier probably wishes Thompson had one more year of eligibility. But instead the Head Ball Coach has to find a new quarterback this spring. Connor Mitch served as the primary backup last season and looks to be the early favorite to win the job, but he's no lock. Perry Orth and Michael Scarnecchia are competing this spring, and true freshman Lorenzo Nunez will have a say when he arrives this summer.

Tennessee: CB Justin Coleman

With more and more teams going to spread offenses, the nickel cornerback has become a valuable asset to SEC defenses. Coleman was a perfect example. As a senior, he led the team with four interceptions. Now Tennessee, who could have one of the top secondaries in the conference, has to find a new nickel corner. Rashaan Gaulden impressed as a freshman on special teams and could be a perfect fit with his size and instincts, but juniors Devaun Swafford and Malik Foreman will also get a look. Swafford played there in 2013.

Vanderbilt: LB Kyle Woestmann

Learning a new defense is not easy, let alone a new position. Just ask Woestmann, who moved from defensive end to linebacker last spring. But he was a gamer. He did it, no questions asked. The only problem now is that Woestmann has moved on. That means it's up to the likes of Stephen Weatherly and Jonathan Wynn to fill the void at outside linebacker. The good news is that both Weatherly and Wynn are already familiar with the position. In fact, Weatherly led the team with 12.5 tackles for loss while Wynn finished with 13 tackles and a sack.

BUFORD, Ga. -- Auburn and Georgia have been battling over top prospects in the Peach State for many a year. In the class of 2016, it’s an uber talented collection of defensive linemen who will lead to what are sure to be bloodbath recruitments, and there is none bigger than 6-foot-6, 325-pound Julian Rochester.

The No. 32-ranked prospect in the ESPN Junior 300 has been considered an Auburn lean for some time due in large part to a very strong relationship between the dominant defensive lineman and Auburn assistant Rodney Garner.


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SEC morning links

March, 24, 2015
Mar 24
9:00
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Alabama returned from a 10-day break from practice on Monday, and one of the Crimson Tide’s most intriguing players this spring worked at two different positions. Kenyan Drake, who broke his leg during a game last season, worked at both running back and at wide receiver during the media viewing periods on Monday. Drake flashed impressive rushing and receiving skills last season before suffering the devastating leg injury, so it’s not exactly a surprise that he took some practice reps at both spots. What might be a bit surprising is how quickly he’s already back on the field, roughly five months after the injury. If he returns to previous form by the time the season starts -- and those at Alabama seem optimistic that he will be -- his unique set of skills will make Lane Kiffin’s offense much more dangerous this fall.

Add another chapter to the John Chavis-LSU squabble. LSU’s legal team lobbed some grenades at Chavis -- the school’s former defensive coordinator -- and his new employer, Texas A&M, in response to his lawsuit claiming that he does not owe LSU a buyout. According to a story in the Baton Rouge Advocate, LSU’s response said that “Chavis happened to defect to Texas A&M to begin working for A&M before his service to LSU was complete. Notwithstanding the Aggies’ dire need for defensive help, Chavis could have defected to a college or professional team in any state, or even a foreign country.” Dang. “Dire need for defensive help?” Not that such a statement is false. A&M’s defense has been atrocious for the last couple of years. But this situation has officially gotten ugly, with Chavis claiming that LSU owes him back pay and LSU insisting that he violated terms of his contract by refusing to pay a $400,000 buyout when he bolted for A&M after last season. It’s going to make for an interesting subplot when these two programs meet in November.

Around the SEC

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California, Florida and Texas are largely considered the "Big Three" in college football recruiting. But national recruiting analyst Gerry Hamilton joins ESPN's Phil Murphy to explain why Georgia deserves to be in the top tier and has numbers to prove it.
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