<
>

LSU linebackers are a versatile bunch

BATON ROUGE, La. – One of the biggest defensive storylines from LSU’s spring practices was the position shuffling that took place at linebacker.

If you weren’t paying close attention at the Tigers’ spring game, however, you might not have realized just how much shuffling had taken place.

“We kept moving them around even in the spring game and nobody noticed this,” said John Chavis, LSU’s defensive coordinator and linebackers coach. “Three guys that played on our Purple team [the group that featured the second-team defense] played a different position every series.”

One of those players was Kendell Beckwith, who is slotted to play middle linebacker after contributing mostly at defensive end in 2013. Another was Deion Jones, who provided the game’s first points when he picked off an Anthony Jennings pass and returned it 67 yards for a touchdown. And a third was Ronnie Feist, who led all tacklers with 14 stops.

This after position switches by presumptive starters Kwon Alexander and Lamar Louis also generated headlines earlier in the spring, with Alexander moving from strongside linebacker to weakside and Louis shifting from middle linebacker to strongside.

“I like to cross-train guys because if you get someone go down, it’s not the guy that’s behind him on the depth chart, but it’s going to be the next-best linebacker we’re going to put in the game,” Chavis said.

Chavis employed that strategy to great effect this spring, putting players like Alexander and Louis in positions that might help them better take advantage of their athleticism. Earlier this month, Chavis said Alexander playing on the weak side -- perhaps the most important playmaking position among the linebackers -- “fits him perfectly” and added that Louis “did a really good job on the strong side” despite a hand injury that kept him in a green no-contact jersey for most of the spring.

He reserved his most glowing praise for D.J. Welter, however, noting that the talented Beckwith’s presence immediately behind him on the depth chart seemed to motivate the senior middle linebacker.

“Believe it or not, we had a senior that had his best spring practice. D.J. by far had the best spring practice that you can easily say that I’ve been around,” Chavis said of Welter, who is LSU’s top returning tackler with 80 stops in 2013. “He was incredible this spring, and I think rightfully so because he’s got a big guy behind him that’s pushing him that’s going to be a great football player and that’s going to play.

“Kendell Beckwith’s going to play a lot of football this year and for a while here at LSU. Competition makes you better and I think he took heed to the competition.”

There should be no shortage of competition among the players at Chavis’ position this fall. Louis said during the spring that LSU will boast its fastest, most athletic group of linebackers in years -- and the talent within the group will only grow when signees Clifton Garrett and Donnie Alexander arrive on campus.

The linebackers probably rank as LSU’s deepest, most experienced defensive position group as the season approaches, placing a burden on Chavis’ group to lead while green players at other positions find their legs. But if the Tigers find the right combinations at positions like defensive tackle and safety, LSU’s defense might continue its progress from late last fall following a shaky start to the 2013 season.

“Obviously we take a lot of pride in being good up front,” Chavis said. “If you’re going to win championships, you need good players everywhere and that’s what we’re here for: to compete for championships. Certainly I think we made some steps in that direction.

“We’ve got a lot of work to do. I’m proud of those guys that I coach personally, but I kind of keep a big eye on the entire defense. Hopefully if we mature at a couple positions, hopefully we can create some special things.”